Tag Archives: tony gonzalez

Baltimore says Bye, Bye Blackbirds

Derrick Mason

Derrick Mason was among the Ravens told they will be released. Image by Keith Allison via Flickr

As the lockout ended and the craziness began, the Baltimore Ravens made the first big moves by announcing that four veterans – WR Derrick Mason, TE Todd Heap, RB Willis McGahee, and NT Kelly Gregg – will be released. Below are some thoughts on the moves and the players’ futures.

For the Ravens, the moves save a bunch of money under the salary cap, while putting these veterans into a marked that glutted with players. That may allow them to bring back a couple of them – Mason and Gregg seem to be most logical – at cheaper prices. But if all four are gone for good, Gregg may be the biggest loss. The nose tackle started all 16 games last year, and he proved to be a solid player against the run who allowed DEs Haloti Ngata and Cory Redding more latitude to make plays. Now the onus is on second-year player Terrence Cody to emerge as a solid starter. Cody has talent, but his conditioning was a big question entering the league last year. That has to cause some concern after the offseason lockout. Gregg, meanwhile, could hook on as a solid nose tackle for another 3-4 team, and a contender like the Jets would be wise to add him.

Mason has been shocking productive for the Ravens, but being solid isn’t the same as being dynamic. The Ravens now turn to Anquan Boldin, last season’s big acquisition, as their unquestioned No. 1 receiver. Rookies Torrey Smith and Tandon Doss now have a huge chance to jump into the lineup, but a lack of depth could force the Ravens to call Mason back and see if he’ll play for less. Regardless, Mason has enough left to be a starter somewhere.

Heap had a solid 10-year career as a former Ravens’ first-round pick, and last year was another solid season. But 2010 draft picks Dennis Pitta and Ed Dickson both have great potential as receivers, so Heap’s high price tag was too much for the Ravens to bear. But Heap has enough left to hook on as a receiving tight end, especially if a contender needs help. For example, if Tony Gonzalez doesn’t re-sign with the Falcons, Heap would be a nice fallback option.

McGahee lost his starting job to Ray Rice a few years back, and he never was able to make the transition to being a short-yardage back or a fullback. McGahee’s future is the least promising of any of these vets, since older running backs whose performance is falling off usually don’t get back over the cliff.



Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency

NFC South free-agency preview

Harvey Dahl

Falcons ORG Harvey Dahl. Image via Wikipedia

National Football Authority has spent the last two days previewing free agency for all 32 teams. I contributed to the NFC South article, discussing the Panthers’ and Falcons’ to-do lists. Click the link to read about Tony Gonzalez, Steve Smith, Charles Johnson, Tyson Clabo, Harvey Dahl, and more.

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Filed under Football Relativity, National Footbal Authority, NFL Free Agency, NFL trades

Finding a Fit: Zach Miller

The lockout is on the verge of ending, and the proposed resolution will set four- and five-year veterans free. So in our next edition of Finding a Fit, we’re going to feature someone from that class – the best unfettered tight end, Zach Miller of the Raiders.

Previous Finding a Fit features focused on Matt Hasselbeck, Nnamdi Asomugha, Ray EdwardsAubrayo Franklin, Plaxico Burress, Tyson Clabo, and Matt Light. Click through to check those out. Since the lockout is likely ending, this will probably be the last Finding a Fit feature of the offseason, so that we can turn to signings analysis soon.

Zach Miller, courtesy of theredzonereport.com


Miller, a former second-round pick, has put together four solid NFL seasons. After a solid rookie season, Miller has averaged 60.7 catches for 756 yards over the past three seasons despite having some of the shakiest quarterback play in the league. He’s a big target at 6-foot-5, but he has the speed to get down the seam and make big plays. The Raiders looked as though they were going to use their franchise tag on Miller, but a strange cause in OLB Kamerion Wimbley’s contract forced the Raiders to spend their tag there. That means Miller will hit the free-agent market without restriction, and he should be a popular target in Oakland and elsewhere.

Potential Fits

Oakland – The Raiders want to keep Miller, because they know he can make big plays while also being a dependable receiver. That’s important, since the Raiders rely on young, unproven receivers like Louis Murphy, Jacoby Ford, and the disappointing Darrius Heyward-Bey. The Raiders don’t have another legit TE option, and they’ve been knowing to overpay to keep their guys, so Miller could get an offer he can’t refuse from the Godfather Al Davis.

Denver – If the Raiders don’t keep Miller, their AFC West rivals in Denver could provide a quality landing spot. The Broncos had some of the worst TE production in the league last year. Daniel Graham is good as a  blocker, but he makes next to no plays in the passing game. And the Broncos’ two draft picks at the position, Julius Thomas and Virgil Green, aren’t likely to be big-time threats. Denver needs help in a lot of areas, but Miller would be a major upgrade in one.

Arizona – Like the Broncos, the Cards had horrific TE play last year. Holdover Ben Patrick makes little difference, and third-round pick Robert Housler is a raw prospect. That means that Miller (an Arizona State product) could come home and make a big difference. At one point, the Cards had such WR depth that a tight end wasn’t vital, but Larry Fitzgerald needs help, and Miller could provide it. If the Cards are looking to add a veteran QB, adding Miller could be a nice inducement.

Miami – The Dolphins’ offense likes to use a tight end, but Anthony Fasano is no more than a decent option. So Miller could be the kind of seam threat that would add a lot to the passing game.

Cleveland – As the Browns move to a West Coast offense, a big-time receiving tight end becomes important. Benjamin Watson had a nice season last year, and fourth-rounder Jordan Cameron could develop into a successor, but at least calling to see what neighborhood Miller’s price tag is in would be wise for the Browns.

St. Louis – The Rams didn’t get great production at tight end last year with Daniel Fells and Michael Hoomanawanui, although Hoomanawanui has potential. But Miller doesn’t dovetail with new coordinator Josh McDaniels’ offense, and the Rams need to spend their attention on outside receivers more than at tight end.

Atlanta – The Falcons will likely try to re-sign Tony Gonzalez, but if the free agent leaves, Miller could become their latest splashy, high-dollar addition.

N.Y. Giants – The Giants have gotten good production out of Kevin Boss in recent years, but Boss is fairly injury prone, and youngster Travis Beckum has yet to develop. So while adding Miller would be a major luxury, it does make a bit of sense.

Buffalo – The Bills are bereft of tight end talent aside from the injury-prone Shawn Nelson, so Miller is a fit. But it’s hard to see Miller going to play for a terrible team in terrible weather.

The Best Fits

1. Oakland – We smell an overpay coming from the Raiders when it comes to Miller. The question is whether Miller would want to leave enough to turn down more money.

2. Arizona – A homecoming for Miller makes a lot of sense, especially if the Cards find a veteran QB to add.

3. Denver – The Broncos outpace Miami as the stalking horse in this race.


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Filed under Finding a Fit, Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency

From T.O. to HOF?


Jerry Rice vs NY Giants cornerback (1995)

Should Terrell Owens make the Hall of Fame? And where does he rank among all-time receivers? This week’s news that T.O. suffered a torn ACL got us to thinking. We’ve already considered the way Owens’ career may have ended; now, let’s think about his place in history. (Hat tip to the Open Mic Daily guys for raising the questions and getting me thinking. UPDATE: Here’s the podcast of our conversation.)

We went to Pro Football Reference to look at the numbers. Going through the list, we considered 17 receivers from the top 20 in all-time receptions. (We left out No. 6 Tony Gonzalez, since he’s a tight end; No. 19 Larry Centers, since he was a fullback; and No. 20 Steve Largent, since he’s clearly from another era.) Of that group, only two are in the Hall of Fame – No. 1 Jerry Rice and No.  11 Art Monk. And Monk is the only guy on the list who played a significant portion of his career in the pre-Jerry Rice era (which began in 1985.)

Of these 17 receivers, we knocked out six – Monk, whose peak began before the era began, and five players who weren’t among the top 30 in receptions, yards, and touchdowns – Derrick Mason, Keenan McCardell, Jimmy Smith, Muhsin Muhammad, Rod Smith. We then added in four others – Reggie Wayne, Larry Fitzgerald, and Andre Johnson, who don’t meet the numbers thresholds yet but should soon; and Michael Irvin, who has made the Hall of Fame.

So we set out to compare Owens to the other receivers of his era.

Hall of Fame level: Jerry Rice, Randy Moss, Terrell Owens, Cris Carter, Hines Ward, Michael Irvin, Marvin Harrison – We prefer Moss to Owens slightly, since Moss was the more dynamic threat, but both belong in the Hall. So does Carter, who may finally get over the hump now that Shannon Sharpe has gotten in to ease the receiver backlog. Ward has moved into the Hall of Fame level in the last few years as the leading receiver in the Steelers’ Super Bowl run; if Irvin is in, Ward should be in too. They’re equals. Harrison is an interesting case; his numbers say he’s in, but was he a really good player with a great quarterback, or a great player in his own right.

Current players: We’d also put Larry Fitzgerald and Andre Johnson in this level at this point in their careers. They need to continue adding to their accomplishments, but they’re on track to get in. Reggie Wayne strikes us as a 50/50 case right now; could he eventually pass Harrison in line?

Just outside the HOF bubble: Tim Brown, Andre Reed, Torry Holt, Isaac Bruce, Art Monk, Irving Fryar – Brown’s numbers are great, but he strikes us as a really good player who compiled great numbers. Bruce and Holt played in a WR-friendly system with the Rams; how could you choose between them for the Hall? Reed falls short, and we believe Monk should have as well. But if any of these players made the Hall of Fame, it wouldn’t be a travesty. We were shocked Fryar hit the numbers standards, but he did so just barely. He’s a level below the rest of the bubble guys.

Current players: Derrick Mason, Chad Ochocinco, Donald Driver, Anquan Boldin, Steve Smith, and Santana Moss have gaudy numbers but fall below the bubble as well. We don’t see any of this group crossing the HOF threshold.

Just missed the numbers thresholds: Keenan McCardell, Jimmy Smith, Muhsin Muhammad, Rod Smith – These guys were good but not great. They may be Hall of Fame finalists, but they won’t find their way in.



Filed under Football Relativity, Pro Football Hall of Fame, research project

FR: Pro Football Hall of Fame 2011 Class

Deion Sanders (left) and Marshall Faulk should lead the class of 2011

Each year on FootballRelativity.com, we compare the 17 Hall of Fame finalists in terms of whom we think should be elected. So here’s a look at this year’s contenders for enshrinement in Canton. (Here are links to a comparison of last year’s finalists, and thoughts on the class that was elected.)

Jerome Bettis– Running Back – 1993-95 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1996-2005 Pittsburgh Steelers (first year eligible)
Tim Brown – Wide Receiver/Kick Returner – 1988-2003 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders, 2004 Tampa Bay Buccaneers (repeat finalist)
Cris Carter – Wide Receiver – 1987-89 Philadelphia Eagles, 1990-2001 Minnesota Vikings, 2002 Miami Dolphins (repeat finalist)
Dermontti Dawson– Center – 1988-2000 Pittsburgh Steelers (repeat finalist)
Richard Dent – Defensive End – 1983-1993, 1995 Chicago Bears, 1994 San Francisco 49ers, 1996 Indianapolis Colts, 1997 Philadelphia Eagles (repeat finalist)
Chris Doleman– Defensive End/Linebacker – 1985-1993, 1999 Minnesota Vikings, 1994-95 Atlanta Falcons, 1996-98 San Francisco 49ers (eligible before but first-time finalist)
Marshall Faulk – Running Back – 1994-98 Indianapolis Colts, 1999-2005 St. Louis Rams (first time eligible)
Charles Haley – Defensive End/Linebacker – 1986-1991, 1999 San Francisco 49ers, 1992-96 Dallas Cowboys (repeat finalist)
Chris Hanburger– Linebacker – 1965-1978 Washington Redskins (seniors candidate)
Cortez Kennedy– Defensive Tackle – 1990-2000 Seattle Seahawks (repeat finalist)
Curtis Martin – Running Back – 1995-97 New England Patriots, 1998-2005 New York Jets (first year eligible)
Andre Reed – Wide Receiver – 1985-1999 Buffalo Bills, 2000 Washington Redskins (repeat finalist)
Les Richter – Linebacker – 1954-1962 Los Angeles Rams (seniors candidate)
Willie Roaf– Tackle – 1993-2001 New Orleans Saints, 2002-05 Kansas City Chiefs (first year eligible)
Ed Sabol– Founder/President/Chairman – 1964-1995 NFL Films (eligible before but first-time finalist)
Deion Sanders – Cornerback/Kick Returner/Punt Returner – 1989-1993 Atlanta Falcons, 1994 San Francisco 49ers, 1995-99 Dallas Cowboys, 2000 Washington Redskins, 2004-05 Baltimore Ravens (first year eligible)
Shannon Sharpe – Tight End – 1990-99, 2002-03 Denver Broncos, 2000-01 Baltimore Ravens (repeat finalist)

Let’s play relativity. 10 points will be an automatic yes vote, 1 point is someone who should not be a finalist again.
(By the way, all links to players are from the Pro Football Hall of Fame website, which is home to an incredible trove of research. Consider this a recommendation.)

10 – Deion Sanders – Sanders wasn’t the most complete corner ever, but he may have been the best cover man of his or any era. Combine that with his electric returning ability, and you have a no-doubt Hall of Famer. Sanders’ career was a bit strange because he played both in the NFL and in Major League Baseball, and because of his prodigous ego and love of the spotlight he bounced around quite a bit. But there was plenty of substance beneath the flash. The accolades are there – a member of the all-1990s team, eight Pro Bowl appearances and six All-Pro nods, and two Super Bowl rings – but the fact that Sanders at his apex was the scariest player on the field is enough for us. Some voters might be put off by Sanders’ bombastic nature or his unwillingness to tackle, but even those issues won’t be enough to keep Sanders out of the Hall of Fame on the first ballot.

9 – Marshall Faulk – Of the three running backs on the ballot for the first time this year, we believe Faulk is the clear-cut leader of the group for first-year enshrinement. Faulk was the ideal running back for the Greatest Show on Turf in St. Louis because he was just as deadly catching the ball out of the backfield as he was running the ball. He won league MVP honors in both 2000 and 2001 and was part of two Rams Super Bowl teams. And that St. Louis dominance came after an incredibly productive five-year stint with the Colts. Faulk played 13 years, and his rushing total of 12,279 place him 10th all time, below fellow nominees Curtis Martin and Jerome Bettis. But Faulk added another 6,875 receiving yards, which is the reason we put him ahead of those two nominees. In yards from scrimmage, Faulk is fourth all time, behind only Jerry Rice, Emmitt Smith, and Walter Payton. That elite company better reflects Faulk’s career. We believe Faulk deserves enshrinement right away, even if it comes at the expense of Martin and Bettis in 2011.

8 – Cris Carter – We don’t get it. For the last two years, we’ve endorsed Carter as a Hall of Famer. In our minds, he’s an easy choice over fellow finalists Andre Reed and Tim Brown at the position, as well as a narrow choice over receiving tight end Shannon Sharpe. But apparently that clump of receivers in the final 17 have kept Carter out. Instead, seniors candidate Bob Hayes and no-brainer Jerry Rice have been enshrined the last two years. Carter will still need to clear Brown and Reed, but that shouldn’t be a problem. Carter has 1,101 career catches to place third all-time. That’s seven more catches than Brown (despite playing one fewer season) and 150 more than Reed. And Carter was always on the list of the five best receivers in the league throughout the 1990s, as shown by his all-decade team accolades. At some point, voters will have to admit the next receiver, and Carter should be the guy.

7 – Ed Sabol – Sabol has been eligible for the Hall of Fame for many years, but he finally crossed into finalist territory this year. He’s become a cause celebre of Peter King and others for his role in creating NFL Films. For nearly 50 years, NFL Films has promoted and propagated the popularity of the NFL. Sabol started NFL Films and worked there until retiring in 1995. It’s hard to compare a contributor like Sabol to a class otherwise filled with players, but if ever a contributor deserved one of the seven Hall of Fame spots, it’s Sabol. Our hunch is that there’s enough momentum behind him that he’ll be inducted now that he has finally made it to finalist status.

7 (con’t) – Richard Dent – We’ve endorsed Dent for enshrinement the last two years, but he’s been passed over for Derrick Thomas in 2009 and John Randle last year. Dent was a dominant force for the classic Bears teams in the 1980s, and he won Super Bowl 20 MVP honors. He has 137.5 career sacks, which doesn’t live up to the total Chris Doleman posted but doesn’t reflect Dent’s dominance. Dent has been a finalist every year since 2005, and at some point he has to get over the hump. Given the defensive crop this year, it may be now or never for Dent. We believe it should be now.

7 (con’t) – Chris Hanburger – It’s never easy for us to evaluate the seniors candidates, but history indicates that most of them win election if they make it past the seniors committee. That bodes well for Hanburger, who started at linebacker for the Redskins for 14 years in the 1960s and 70s. With four All-Pro selections and nine Pro Bowl nods, Hanburger has the resume to merit election, and the fact that he started 135 straight games during the prime of his career is a good sign as well. He had a great career given the fact that he started out as an 18th-round draft pick, and it now appears that this career could well end up in the Hall of Fame.

6 – Shannon Sharpe – Tight end isn’t a prolific position in terms of producing Hall of Famers, and that plus the surplus of receivers have worked against Sharpe in his candidacy thus far. Like Dent, we have endorsed Sharpe the first two years of this post, and we’re doing so again. He merits inclusion, because he was the perfect West Coast offense tight end. He wasn’t an outstanding blocker, but he was effective, and he played a key role on three Super Bowl teams – two in Denver and one in Baltimore. But Sharpe is 250 catches (and counting) behind Tony Gonzalez, which isn’t helping his cause. But Sharpe’s high level of play for championship teams is something Gonzalez can’t rival. Sharpe deserves induction.

6 (con’t) – Les Richter – Richter, already a member of the College Football Hall of Fame, played his entire nine-year career for the Rams, who had acquired him in an 11-for-1 deal. He debuted two years after being drafted, after serving in the military, and made the Pro Bowl in each of his first eight seasons as a linebacker. He also served as a placekicker and even played some center for the Rams. No wonder he was first- or second-team All-Pro in each of his first six seasons. Now that Richter has made it past the seniors committee, the late Richter should find his way into the Hall of Fame.

5 – Curtis Martin – Martin was rarely a great, but he was very good for a long time for the Patriots and Jets. As a result, his accumulated totals put him in the pantheon of the all-time greats. But Martin made just five Pro Bowls in his 11 seasons, and he was an All-Pro just twice and led the league in rushing just once. That makes his candidacy wobbly, despite the fact that he’s currently the fourth all-time rusher in the league. Martin’s going to be an interesting case, because he (like Bettis and future nominee Edgerrin James and Fred Taylor) have monstrous numbers but rare moments of dominance. That, to us, means that Martin doesn’t pass the smell test, at least in his first season. Faulk must go in ahead of Martin, and while Martin leads Bettis, we don’t see room for more than one running back in this year’s class. Maybe Martin will sneak in in the future, but this shouldn’t be his year.

5 (con’t) – Dermontti Dawson – We moved Dawson down a level from last year, because while we would still vote for him, we don’t have a good feeling about his chances. Dawson played 13 years and was a six-time All-Pro, which clearly established him as the best center of the 1990s. He had a long career and was dominant at his position. For Dwight Stephenson a decade before him, that meant induction. But Dawson needs to get in soon, before other linemen like Walter Jones, Orlando Pace, and Jonathan Ogden start hitting the ballot. Otherwise Dawson’s wait will be prolonged.

4- Charles Haley – Haley’s an interesting case, because he was such a big factor for two dynastic teams – the 49ers and the Cowboys. As a result, he has an unprecedented five Super Bowl rings. That’s the cornerstone of his Hall of Fame candidacy. He also played well both as a 4-3 defensive end and a 3-4 outside linebacker, which is a credit to his ability. but his sack numbers – 100.5 – pale in comparison to Richard Dent and Chris Doleman, making it hard to justify choosing Haley over those players. It wouldn’t be a travesty to put Haley in the Hall of Fame, but there are more deserving guys in the group of finalists this year.

4 (con’t) – Cortez Kennedy – When Kennedy first showed up on the Hall of Fame radar, we wrote off his candidacy, but he seems to be a legitimate borderline candidate. He was a dominant defensive tackle for years, although the fact that he played in Seattle his entire career kept him under the radar to some degree. Still, he earned eight Pro Bowl berths and three All-Pro nods, made the 1990s All-Decade team, and won defensive player of the year honors in 1992. Kennedy’s position keeps him from having numbers to bolster his case, but he was a dominant force, and that may be enough to sneak him into a class as a compromise candidate.

4 (con’t) – Willie Roaf – Roaf played in a golden era of tackles, yet he still carved out a niche as an elite left tackle. He wasn’t quite the pass blocker that Walter Jones or Jonathan Ogden were, but like Orlando Pace he was a good pass blocker who also handled his business in the run game. The question is how many of those tackles will get into the Hall of Fame, because Roaf is probably third or fourth in that elite group. With six first-team and three second-team All-Pro nods,  Roaf clearly belongs among those four, and the former Saint and Chief also made the all-decade team for both the 1990s and the 2000s. And coming up for election before the other three guys could help him, since the ballot isn’t as crowded at this point. We could see Roaf getting in, but our sense is that he should probably wait until at least Jones and Ogden of his contemporaries get in first.

3 – Tim Brown – Brown was a terrific player for many years, and the former Heisman Trophy winner is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame based on his Notre Dame career. But we believe he falls just short of the level required to be a Pro Football Hall of Famer. Brown has 1,094 career catches, placing him fourth all-time. He was also a dynamic return man for much of his career. But Brown never was the dominant receiver of his era – while he was a nine-time Pro Bowler and a 1990s All-Decade player, he wasn’t ever a first-team all-pro. So to us, Brown doesn’t feel like a Hall of Famer. We won’t start a riot if he gets in, but like Curtis Martin, Brown falls just below the standard to us.

2 – Jerome Bettis – Bettis is perhaps the trickiest of any of this year’s first-time nominees, because he had a strange career. Here’s the good of his candidacy: He is fifth all-time in rushing yards, thanks to eight 1,000-yard seasons with the Rams and Steelers. He’s also a unique player – the first big back to be a full-time runner instead of a short-yardage specialist. But Bettis made the transition to short-yardage specialist late in his career, and in his last eight years he averaged more than four yards a carry just once. He declined pretty quickly after age 30, and he also had two below-par years early in his career. So while Bettis had four great seasons and impressive career statistics, to us he is not a Hall of Fame back. He certainly falls below Marshall Faulk in the pecking order, and we’d prefer Curtis Martin as well. Bettis’ gregarious nature will help his chances, but ultimately he feels like a lost cause in terms of Canton.

2 (con’t) – Andre Reed – Reed was a great receiver for the Bills’ teams in the early 1990s, and his career total of 951 receptions for more than 13,000 yards is impressive. But he’s not a Hall of Famer. He was never an All-Pro – considered one of the top two receivers in the league in any given year. He was a second-team all-pro just twice. He did make seven Pro Bowls, and he was a key part of Buffalo’s AFC dynasty. But compared to other receivers like Cris Carter, Shannon Sharpe, and even Tim Brown, he doesn’t measure up. That’s why we’ve moved Reed down our comparison vs. last year. Reed belongs in the Hall of the Very Good, not the Hall of Fame.

1 – Chris Doleman – Doleman has been eligible for several years, but he moved into the realm of the finalists for the first time this year. And his chances are tied almost solely to his sack total. He had 150.5 career sacks, good for fifth all-time, and parlayed his ability to get to the quarterback into three first-team All-Pro selections and eight Pro Bowl berths. We’d prefer Richard Dent to Doleman, but strange things have happened in the pass-rushing category in recent years, so we can’t write Doleman off completely. Still, for our tastes he was too much of a one-dimensional player to merit inclusion in Canton.

So who will make it in? We believe Sanders and Faulk are shoo-ins, and we also think Richter and Hanburger will get thumbs up. That leaves three spots. Sabol gets one of those spots, while the other two should go to Carter and Dent. We’ve been wrong on those last two for two years running, but we’ll assert once again that this should be their year.



Filed under Football Relativity, preja vu, Pro Football Hall of Fame

Fantasy Football Applaud or a Fraud Week 7

Week 7 featured many breakout fantasy performances. So which ones are signs of things to come, and which are merely one-week flukes? That’s the question we’re trying to figure out in Fantasy Football Applaud or a Fraud. As always, with each verdict we’ll provide context so that you know what it means.

Darren McFadden scores (again) against the Broncos. Photo via espn.com


Ryan Fitzpatrick, Bills – Since taking over as the Bills’ starter, Fitzpatrick has thrown for two touchdowns or more in all four starts. He had a huge game against the Ravens with four TD passes and 374 yards. He’s a little bit of a risk as a starter because he has two two-interception games and has thrown for less than 250 yards in his other three starts, but if you’re looking for a backup or for a fill-in starter, Fitzpatrick is a solid guy to take a risk on. Verdict: Applaud

Matt Moore, Panthers – Moore, who retook the Panthers’ starting QB job over the bye week, delivered 308 passing yards and two touchdowns in the Panthers’ first win of the year. But we need to see Moore deliver more often before we buy into him as a quality fantasy option. Verdict: A fraud

Running backs

LeGarrette Blount, Buccaneers – Blount was the Buccaneers’ leading rusher against the Rams with 72 yards, and he had 11 carries to four for Cadillac Williams. This may be the sign that the undrafted rookie out of Oregon has surpassed Williams on the depth chart. Regardless, this is the week to claim Blount, because he won’t be available for long. Verdict: Applaud

Darren McFadden, Raiders – McFadden was questionable entering the game after missing the last two games, but he returned with a vengeance, scoring four touchdowns in the Raiders’ rout of the Broncos in Denver. McFadden ran for 165 yards and had 31 receiving yards, and he immediately took over for Michael Bush as the Raiders’ feature back. He looks like a top-15 fantasy back if he can stay healthy the rest of the year. Verdict: Applaud

Knowshon Moreno, Broncos – In the midst of the Broncos’ debacle against the Raiders, Moreno scored two touchdowns as a receiver and had 90 yards from scrimmage. The Broncos aren’t using Moreno enough to make him a top-20 fantasy back, but he should get enough chances to be a solid flex play most weeks. Verdict: Applaud

Wide receivers

Kenny Britt scores (again) against the Eagles. Photo via espn.com

Davone Bess, Dolphins – Bess had six catches for 66 yards and a touchdown against the Steelers. He’s now scored in three straight games, and he’s had at least five catches in five of six games this year. He’s a dependable fantasy starter in leagues where you start three wideouts or in leagues of 12 teams or more. Verdict: Applaud

Dwayne Bowe, Chiefs – Two weeks ago, we rated Bowe a fraud after a drop-filled game against the Colts. But Bowe has stepped up since then, and this week he had six catches for 53 yards and two touchdowns. Suddenly, he’s playing like a No. 1 receiver for the Chiefs, and that performance has made him a solid fantasy starter. Bowe is still a little bit of a risk because his inconsistency, but he’s also a high-reward play. That makes him worth starting. Verdict: Applaud

Kenny Britt, Titans – Britt sat out the first quarter against the Eagles after a Friday morning bar fight, but he made up for lost time with seven catches for 225 yards and three touchdowns. He’s scored in five straight games, and despite some immaturity he’s emerging as a legitimate No. 1 receiver for the Titans. He needs to be in your starting lineup every week. Verdict: Applaud

Lee Evans, Bills – Evans didn’t have as many yards as teammate Steve Johnson (see below), but he did have 105 yards and three touchdowns against the Ravens. The seventh-year veteran, who has spent his entire career out of the spotlight in Buffalo, has scored the last two weeks, and Ryan Fitzpatrick’s presence has given all of Buffalo’s targets a little more potential. But we prefer Johnson to Evans at this point, making Evans a decent flex play during bye weeks but not much more. Verdict: A fraud

David Gettis, Panthers – Gettis had just 10 catches entering Sunday’s game, but he went nuts against the 49ers with eight catches for 125 yards and two touchdowns. Gettis is a big, rangy receiver, and he seems to have surpassed fellow rookie Brandon LaFell (six catches, 91 yards) as the Panthers’ No. 2 receiver. And with Matt Moore returning as starting quarterback, the Panthers had passing-game success for the first time all year. But there hasn’t been much value in the Panthers’ offense aside from Steve Smith this season, so going crazy over Gettis isn’t wise. He’s only a pick-up in leagues with 14 teams or more. Verdict: A fraud

Steve Johnson, Bills – Johnson had eight catches for 158 yards and a score against the Ravens, and since Ryan Fitzpatrick took over as the Bills’ starter, Johnson has scored in every game. Not only is he a pick up – right now he should be a starter for your team. Verdict: Applaud

Terrell Owens and Chad Ochocinco, Bengals – In our Bengals/Falcons game thoughts, we talked about how both Owens and Ochocinco are decent second receivers in 12-team or larger leagues. Verdict: Applaud

Tight ends

Tony Gonzalez, Falcons – We discussed in our Bengals/Falcons game thoughts why Gonzalez is no longer a fantasy starter at tight end. Verdict: A fraud


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Filed under Applaud/A Fraud, Fantasy Football, Football Relativity

Bengals/Falcons thoughts

Each week, we focus on one game and share our thoughts on it, both from an on-field perspective and a fantasy football perspective. This week, we focus on the topsy-turvy contest between the Cincinnati Bengals and the Atlanta Falcons, which the Falcons won 39-32.

Roddy White celebrates for the Falcons against the Bengals. Photo from espn.com

It’s hard to know how good these teams are after such a strange game. Atlanta took a 24-3 halftime lead in a dominating first 30 minutes, but Cincinnati used big plays to score 22 unanswered points in the third quarter to take the lead. But the Falcons responded with two big drives to score 14 fourth-quarter points to put the game away. Atlanta is now 5-2 and at the top of the NFC standings, while the Bengals fall to 2-5 and are three games behind the Ravens and three and a half behind the Steelers in the AFC North.

On-field perspective
*Roddy White (pictured) showed in this game why he is a true No. 1 receiver in this league. Even though he’s the Falcons’ only real outside threat, he still caught 11 passes for 201 yards and two touchdowns, with a two-point conversion catch thrown in for good measure. White doesn’t get the publicity that other receivers get, but he’s just as important to the Falcons as guys like Andre Johnson or Calvin Johnson are to their teams. After a slow start to his career, White has developed into an elite player.
*While White proved once again in this game that’s he’s elite, there are still questions about whether Matt Ryan is at that same blue-chip level. Ryan showed good patience in the pocket against the Bengals, and he completed 24-of-33 passes for 299 yards, so in this game he showed his talent. But Ryan has always been better at home than on the road, and until he can take his show out of the dome, he’s not near the top-flight level of others at his position.
*The Bengals piled up  412 passing yards, and both outside receivers Chad Ochocinco (10 catches, 131 yards, 1 TD) and Terrell Owens (9 catches, 88 yards, 1 TD) put up big numbers. It was hard to tell whether Carson Palmer was favoring either outside receiver, because the modus operandi seemed to be picking on Christopher Owens outside. (That’s why Christopher Owens had 11 tackles.)
*Rookie Jordan Shipley, now that he’s healthy, is a terrific inside threat to complement Ochocinco and T.O. Shipley broke free for a 64-yard touchdown in the Bengals’ third-quarter explosion, showing great speed in the process. As he develops, he’s going to be tough for safeties to cover inside, and he could turn into a Wes Welker-esque threat.
*The Falcons defense gave up 32 points (although seven came from the Bengals D), but one underrated player impressed – DT Vance Walker. Last year, watching Falcons games unveiled Kroy Biermann to Football Relativity readers, and now we want to pump up Walker, a second-year man out of Georgia Tech. He had five tackles in this game, including one tackle for loss and another stuff of Cedric Benson. Walker’s development inside gives the Falcons another front-four threat.
*The strength of the Bengals’ defense is the secondary, and even though they let White go crazy in this game, Cincy still had two terrific plays. Leon Hall made a leaping interception of  Ryan pass to set up Shipley’s touchdown, and on the next possession Adam (Don’t call me Pacman) Jones stripped White and returned the fumble 59 yards for a touchdown. Still, the consistency was lacking in covering White, and that ended up being a huge reason the Bengals fell to 2-5.
*It didn’t decide the game, but the Bengals made a mistake by going for two points when they scored a touchdown to make it 24-19. They failed on that pass, and after scoring another touchdown failed again, so that they led 25-24 instead of leading by three. The Falcons later made a two-point conversion, and the difference ended up being a field goal. Chasing a two-point conversion to trail or lead by a certain amount is unwise until the fourth quarter, but the Bengals fell into that mindset. (The one exception comes when a team has a chance to tie a game via a two-pointer, as the Dolphins did against the Steelers. But instead of going for two, Miami kicked and trailed 17-16, and ended up losing by one after the teams traded field goals the rest of the way. Anytime a team has a chance to go for two to tie, we believe it should do so.)

Fantasy Football perspective
*While White is an elite receiver and a no-doubt No. 1 fantasy receiver, no one else in the Falcons’ passing game is a starter. That includes TE Tony Gonzalez, who had just two catches in the game and was rarely targeted. There are better under-the-radar tight end options to start now than Gonzalez despite his name value.
*It’s hard for fantasy owners to make the call about who’s better, Owens or Ochocinco. Both players produced this week, and there’s always the chance for that to happen, especially if the Bengals fall behind. Both players fall into the second dozen of fantasy receivers.
*Both Michael Turner and Cedric Benson ran for more than 100 yards in this game, and both remain solid every-week fantasy starters.



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