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Week 7 Transactions

Dallas Clark

Image by Jeffrey Beall via Flickr

Each week we share insights, analysis, and opinions of the week’s transactions. To see previous posts, click here and start working back. 

We’ll begin with the latest Colts injury and what it means. The Colts put TE Dallas Clark on injured reserve Friday with a wrist injury, meaning that he’ll miss the rest of the season. It’s a huge blow to the Colts, because Clark is a terrific receiver who is versatile enough to be in-line, in the slot, or even split out wide. He had more than 100 catches last season, and he’s one of the best red-zone targets in the league. Clark’s injury is the latest blow for a Colts team that is also without RB Joseph Addai and WR Austin Collie when they return from their bye next week. Those injuries limit how creative Peyton Manning can be in spreading the ball around, and it may allow defenses to key on WRs Reggie Wayne and Pierre Garcon. Maybe Anthony Gonzalez can return to significant action for the first time since 2008, but this is a troubling sign for the Colts. Those injuries, plus the problems at safety where Melvin Bullitt is on IR and Bob Sanders is out until December, make the Colts look vulnerable, even though they’re a solid 4-2. The Colts are hoping that this isn’t the year that injuries catch up to them, but right now it looks like the horseshoe on their helmets isn’t nearly lucky enough.

Jaguars (add QBs Todd Bouman and Patrick Ramsey, cut S Gerald Alexander) – With David Garrard and Trent Edwards hurting, the Jags brought in QB reinforcements and may be forced to start Bouman against the Chiefs this week. Alexander has started the last three games for the Jags at safety, but now he’s gone. Jacksonville has gotten rid of two starters, Alexander and Anthony Smith, in the last week or so. That’s a big indictment on how the secondary has played this year.

Texans (cut OT Ephriam Salaam) – With starting OLT Duane Brown returning from his four-game suspension, the Texans released the veteran Salaam.

Bengals (activate S Tom Nelson from the physically unable to perform list) – Nelson was a key backup last year and even started three games, and now he’s finally recovered enough from a knee injury to get off the PUP list and on the field to help the Bengals.

Bears (cut DE Charles Grant) – The Bears brought Grant in a few weeks ago, but they quickly came to the same conclusion that the Dolphins and Saints did – that Grant no longer has it. Chicago promoted DE Barry Turner from the practice squad to take Grant’s place.

Lions (add LB Bobby Carpenter) – Carpenter, a former first-round pick, has bounced from Dallas to St. Louis to Miami over the past several months, and he lost his gig with the Dolphins after some crucial special-teams mistakes. But given the Lions’ lack of LB depth, Carpenter will get a defensive shot in Detroit. He’s at least worth a look to the Lions.

Browns (put OT Tony Pashos and DE Robaire Smith on injured reserve) – Pashos and Smith, both starters, are now out for the season for the Browns. That talent loss is a blow for a team that doesn’t have enough premium guys on the roster.

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Football Relativity: QB quandaries

After a training-camp season full of quarterback stability (only Arizona made an in-camp change), a whopping eight teams ran into quarterback issues by Week Two. Below, we compare the significance of these quarterback issues, given how close teams are to contending and how good the quarterback options are. We’ll do this using Football Relativity, with the 10 level noting the most pressing QB quandary and the 1 level marking one that doesn’t change a team’s fortunes at all.

10 – Philadelphia Eagles (Kevin Kolb or Michael Vick) – Kolb missed Week 2 due to the after-effects of a concussion, and Vick had a big game against the Lions. Vick has completed 64 percent of his passes and thrown for three TDs without an interception, and he has run for 140 yards. He looks revitalized after a disappointing return to the NFL in 2009. At first, the Eagles said they’re sticking with Kolb, who became the franchise quarterback when Philly traded Donovan McNabb. But then the Eagles reversed field (a Vick-ian maneuver) and named Vick the starter not just for Week 3 but going forward. It’s shocking that the Eagles pulled the plug on Kolb after just one half on the field, but Vick’s solid performance won the day. The question is what happens if Vick’s two good games turn into inconsistent play. Philly is a talented team, but unless Vick really is back, the way they’ve handled their QB situation could end up scuttling the season.

9 – none

8 – Tennessee Titans (Vince Young vs. Kerry Collins) – After three turnovers, Vince Young was yanked out of the Titans’ loss to the Steelers, and Collins came in to lead Tennessee’s only TD-scoring drive. Of course, Collins also had two turnovers as well. Jeff Fisher has said there’s no question that Young is the starter, but Collins is a capable quarterback who proved in 2008 he can step in for Young and lead the Titans to the playoffs. (Of course, in 2009 Young replaced Collins and led the Titans from an 0-6 start to an 8-8 finish.) So Young needs to perform well in the next couple of games, or else the clamor for Collins will really pick up.

7 – none

6 – Carolina Panthers (Matt Moore vs. Jimmy Clausen) – The Panthers are making the switch from Moore, the December superstar in ’07 and ’09, to the rookie Clausen after Moore turned the ball over six times and failed to generate much offense in his first two starts. Clausen is polished for a rookie, but he’s still just a rookie who will make mistakes. Given the talent Carolina has elsewhere on the field, quarterback play that rises from putrid to mediocre could help, but the question is whether Clausen is wily enough at this point to be even that small of an upgrade over Moore.

5 – Arizona Cardinals (Derek Anderson vs. Max Hall) – The Cardinals opted for Anderson, a scattershot quarterback with a big arm, over the cautious check-down man Matt Leinart in training camp, but Anderson’s inconsistency has outweighed his potential thus far. Hall, a rookie out of BYU, lurks as a potential replacement. Hall is more of a quick-hitting trigger man who doesn’t have the big arm but might be better equipped to get the ball to Arizona’s strong stable of receiving targets. So if Anderson struggles and the Cards start to fall behind in the lowly NFC West, Hall will get a shot.

4 – Oakland Raiders (Bruce Gradkowski vs. Jason Campbell) – The Raiders brought in Campbell to bring stability to the QB position in place of JaMarcus Russell, but Campbell lasted six quarters until he was benched. Campbell has talent, but he makes enough mistakes to offset his ability to throw the ball downfield. Gradkowski is a Jeff Garcia-type of scrapper who doesn’t have a big arm but does find ways to move a team. The question is whether Gradkowski would be exposed if he played 3-4 games in a row. But for now, the Raiders should try to keep the spark Gradkowski lit last week aflame.

3 – Pittsburgh Steelers (Charlie Batch vs. Byron Leftwich) – Dennis Dixon won the Steelers’ September starting job in training camp, but he suffered a torn meniscus against Tennessee that will sideline him at least until Ben Roethlisberger returns. So now Pittsburgh must choose between Batch, the ultimate placeholder, and Leftwich, who had some good games for Pittsburgh back in 2008 but looked awful for the Bucs last year. Leftwich may have a little more upside, but he’s got such a slow delivery at this point that Batch might actually be less of a liability. But the bottom line is that the Steelers will win the next two games because of defense, not Batch or Leftwich, and so in the end it really doesn’t matter much which guy starts.

2 – Jacksonville Jaguars (David Garrard vs. Todd Bouman) – Garrard threw four picks against the Chargers and was replaced by Luke McCown, but McCown blew out his knee at the end of the game and will miss the rest of the season. Jacksonville brought back Bouman to be Garrard’s backup, but the injury means there’s no question that Garrard is the guy.

1 – Buffalo Bills (Ryan Fitzpatrick vs. Trent Edwards) – The Bills made the switch from Edwards to Fitzpatrick, but both quarterbacks have frankly proved that they’re not good enough to be regulars on the NFL level. No matter who plays, the Bills are among the league’s worst teams in terms of QB play, and they have few hopes of winning.

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Free-agency review – post-draft through May

The free agent moves should start slowing down at this point, but there are still enough of them that it’s worth comparing them. This relativity comparison includes moves starting after draft day all the way through the the month of May. If you want to see previous comparisons, check out this post and move back from there.

10 – Seahawks (keep LB Leroy Hill; add CB Ken Lucas, FB Justin Griffith and LS Bryan Pittman) – Hill was Seattle’s franchise player, but the team pulled the tag off of him after drafting Aaron Curry. But the team still wanted to keep Hill, and so they ended up hammering out a long-term deal with him. Instead of a one-year, $8 million deal, Hill gets a six-year pact worth up to $38 million with $15.5 million guaranteed. He’s a solid player who will team with Curry and Lofa Tatupu to give Seattle a terrific (if expensive) linebacker trio. Lucas was a Seahawk for six years before moving to Carolina for big free-agent dollars. He’s a big physical corner who doesn’t have great speed but doesn’t need it for his style of play. It wasn’t that long ago that Lucas was a top-5 corner in the league. In fact, the Seahawks never were able to replace Lucas’ physicality after he left following the ’04 season. He probably shouldn’t be a No. 1 corner anymore, but he’s still a solid No. 2. Griffith is the prototypical fullback for a West Coast offense. Pittman had spent five-plus years as the Texans’ long snapper before being sidelined in the StarCaps case last year. He is a professional long snapper who fills a spot that’s been a void in Seattle the last couple of years.

10 (con’t) – Dolphins (add DE Jason Taylor) – Taylor and the Dolphins had an acrimonious divorce last offseason, as Taylor went Dancing with the Stars while new team grand poobah Bill Parcells laid down the law. The Fins dealt Taylor to Washington, but knee and calf injuries limited Taylor’s effectiveness. He played in 13 games, but managed just 3.5 sacks. After the season, Taylor decided he would rather spend the offseason at home in Florida than in the ‘Skins training program, so he asked for his release (and gave up $8 million in the process). Now, he lands back with Miami on a one-year, $1.1 million deal. Taylor had a great career in Miami (117 sacks in 11 years), and he really wants to be a Dolphin again. The team hopes that he can go opposite of Joey Porter to accelerate the team’s pass rush. Motivation shouldn’t be a question for Taylor, who seems excited to be back. And in a limited role, he should still be a quality contributor. All in all, it’s a good investment for the Dolphins, who get a pass rusher and a fan favorite for a budget-conscious price. In the end, the Dolphins got a second-rounder from Washington but only lost Taylor’s services for a year.

9 – Bengals (add S Roy Williams) – Williams had some good seasons as an in-the-box safety in Dallas, even reaching Pro Bowl level. But over recent years, his performance has plummeted as his coverage inadequacies have been exposed. That, plus a hefty price tag, led the Cowboys to cut the cord. Now he heads to Cincinnati, where he’s reunited with ex-Cowboys defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer. Zimmer knows what Williams does well and what he can’t do, which gives the Bengals a little better than average chance to use Williams well. Plus, his veteran leadership could help a team that’s slowly building a new defensive nucleus around LBs Keith Rivers and Rey Maualuga. On a short-term, incentive-laden deal, it’s easy to see why Cincinnati would take this shot.

9 (con’t) – 49ers (add CB Dre Bly) – The 49ers replaced Walt Harris, who blew out his ACL in minicamp, with Bly, a fellow veteran who has been a long-term starter in Denver, Detroit, and St. Louis and has 40 career interceptions and Pro Bowl nods in ’03 and ’04.. Bly isn’t as big as Harris, and he’s more of a gambler, but he will provide the expertise and veteran play that San Fran needs across from Nate Clements. Bly is also three years younger, and so while he’s not in his prime anymore, he’s not that far past it. It will be interesting to see if Bly’s ball-hawking style fits Mike Singletary’s approach as well as Harris’ more physical play did. But given how late in free agency Harris’ injury happened, Bly is about the best option the 49ers could have come up with. They needed corner help badly, and they got it in this veteran.

8 – Lions (add LB Larry Foote, OTs Jon Jansen and Ephriam Salaam, OG Toniu Fonoti, and DEs Eric Hicks and Jason Hunter) – Foote had been cut in Pittsburgh for salary-cap reasons. Not only is Foote a Michigan native and alum, he’s an extremely solid inside ‘backer on running downs. He has limitations and probably shouldn’t be trying to drop into coverage, but he is a quality NFL starter who definitely upgrades Detroit’s lion-up. (Sorry.) It’s only a one-year deal, but if Foote provides leadership that term could be extended. Regardless, the Lions’ defense is better today because Foote is there. Jansen quickly latched on with the Lions on a one-year, minimum-salary deal. Like ILB Larry Foote, he’s a Michigan alum who comes home to try to help the first steps of Detroit’s rebuilding process. He might not start, but he provides depth at a trouble spot and should help to mentor ‘08 first-rounder Gosder Cherilus. That’s a good deal for the Lions at the vet minimum. Salaam has started 129 games in his 11 NFL seasons, but he became a backup in Houston last year. Still, given the fact that Detroit didn’t draft a tackle this year, Salaam could find a role for a single season, even with Jansen now around. Hicks and Fonoti are veterans who may not have much left but who are worth a look for a team as talent-depleted as Detroit. Hunter lost his spot in Green Bay when the Packers moved to a 3-4 defense, but he can contribute as a 4-3 end in Detroit.

7 – Browns (add CB Rod Hood and WR Mike Furrey) – Hood, who had started the last two years for the Cardinals, was shoved aside after Arizona added Bryant McFadden. Hood is a big, physical corner who is apt to give up the big play but is an asset against the run and is good enough to start. He steps into a weak spot on the depth chart in Cleveland, and he should surpass Corey Ivy, Eric Wright, or Brandon McDonald to continue as a starter there. As long as the Browns don’t count on him for much man coverage, Hood will help. Meanwhile, the Browns are in serious upheaval at wide receiver. They’ve cut the cord on Joe Jurevicius, and we now must expect Donte Stallworth to miss some time with legal matters related to a deadly car accident he was involved in last year. And that doesn’t even address the persistent Braylon Edwards trade rumors. So Cleveland has tried to reload at receiver, by signing David Patten and drafting Brian Robiskie and Mohammed Massaquoi in the second round. Now they add Mike Furrey, who bounced through the XFL and the Arena League before establishing himself as a legit NFL receiver. Furrey’s best success has come in Mike Martz systems in St. Louis and Detroit, and he doesn’t have great size, but it’s still easy to see him as an effective inside receiver. If nothing else, he’ll try hard and give some level of certainty at a very uncertain position for Cleveland.

6 – Colts (kept LB Freddie Keiaho and DT Ed Johnson) – The Colts didn’t tender Keiaho a contract as a restricted free agent even though he was a starter last season. But they’re bringing him back on a one-year deal to help in a problem area. Keiaho’s small, but he makes enough plays to warrant some snaps. Johnson is a talented defensive tackle who the Colts let go last year after a drug-possession arrest. He fits a need, and the Colts are making it clear that Johnson has a supershort leash. But if he takes advantage of another chance, he’ll help.

6 (con’t) – Saints (add DE Anthony Hargrove) – Hargrove sat out the entire ’08 season after his third violation of the league’s substance abuse policy. He has been reinstated, which makes him valuable to the Saints, who need DE depth for the first four games of the season pending the disputed suspensions of DEs Will Smith and Charles Grant. Both of those starters face four-game bans for using performance-enhancing substances, but they are appealing in court, and no final decision has come down. So Hargrove ends up being a talented insurance policy if he can stay clean.

5 – Patriots (add LB Paris Lenon S Brandon McGowan) – Lenon led the Lions in tackles last year with 121, but he figures in more as a backup in New England. He adds depth and probably fills the roster spot that injured third-round pick Tyrone McKenzie would have occupied. McGowan missed all of last season with an injury, but the former Bear is a physical safety who can step in if rookie Patrick Chung isn’t ready to go for the Pats. With Rodney Harrison likely done, the Pats are wise to add some depth at safety.

5 (con’t) – Raiders (add FB Lorenzo Neal, RB Gary Russell, TE J.P. Foschi and S Keith Davis) – Neal has long been the best blocking fullback in the league. He’s still a hammer who can help open holes for Oakland’s talented running backs. Russell is a backup type who had a short-yardage role in Pittsburgh last year. But he’s unlikely to get many carries or even make the opening-game roster with Darren McFadden, Justin Fargas, and Michael Bush ahead of him on the depth chart. Davis played seven years in Dallas and established himself as a special-teams ace, and last year he started half the year at safety. The Raiders probably need someone better to start, but Davis can be a good backup and a very good contributor on specialty units.

4 – Broncos (add LB Nick Griesen and RB Darius Walker) – Griesen was a backup in Baltimore, and so he knows the 3-4 defense and could fit in for Denver, which is implementing the defense but is still looking for players to start, much less fill roles. Walker showed some promise during his two years in Houston, but he’s not of the caliber of Denver’s top running backs Knowshon Moreno, Correll Buckhalter, or even holdover Peyton Hillis.

4 (con’t) – Bears (add LB Pisa Tinoisamoa and TE Michael Gaines) – Tinoisamoa has limitations, but he fits in as a two-down linebacker alongside Brian Urlacher and Lance Briggs in Chicago. The Tower (of Pisa) knows Bears coach Lovie Smith from the St. Louis days, so the defense will be familiar. Tinoisamoa is a clean-up tackler who doesn’t make a ton of big plays, but he won’t need to with superstars Briggs and Urlacher there. He should help to stabilize the defense and allow Briggs and Urlacher a bit more freedom to attack, both of which are advantages for the Bears. This seems to be a good fit for the Tower. Gaines is a bulky blocking tight end who doesn’t figure as a receiving threat behind Greg Olsen and Desmond Clark but could be useful as a jumbo-package role player. It’s a shame the Bears have three legit tight ends but such a paucity of wideouts.

3 – Chiefs (add C Eric Ghiacius) – Ghiacius started all 16 games at center for the Bengals last year, and he’ll compete with Rudy Niswanger for a starting job in K.C. Ghiacius is a marginal NFL starter, but it will help the Chiefs to have another veteran around for the sake of depth and competition.

3 (con’t) – Steelers (add WR Shaun McDonald, P Dirk Johnson and RB Verron Haynes) – McDonald had a big year in ’07 with Detroit, but when Mike Martz left his role in the offense diminished. McDonald is small but quick. He fits in as a third or fourth receiver in Pittsburgh, but having a veteran like him around is smart because the Steelers still don’t know how second-year WR Limas Sweed will develop. Johnson, who punted in 13 games for the Cardinals last season, is a marginal NFL punter, but he will at least provide some competition at a spot that was a problem for Pittsburgh last year. Haynes was a long-time Steeler who didn’t play last year. He could end up as a backup running back in a bit role.

2 – Ravens (add QB John Beck and WR Kelley Washington) – After the emergence of Joe Flacco last year, the Ravens don’t really have a quarterback need. They have a young starter and a young promising backup in Troy Smith. But Ravens offensive coordinator Cam Cameron drafted Beck in the second round when he was the head coach in Miami, and so he obviously sees potential in him. So the Ravens gave Beck a one-year contract that could last longer because Beck, with just two years of service time, will be controlled by the Ravens for at least one additional season. This is a low-risk move that could pay off in terms of a future trade if Cameron can restore the luster Beck once had as a prospect. Washington is a big, rangy receiver who had some success as a receiver in Cincinnati but never lived up to his potential. Then he went to New England and became a standout special-teamer, which speaks well of his character as a teammate. He’ll find a special-teams role in Baltimore and provide needed depth at receiver, but it’s unlikely that he’ll move too far up the depth chart.

2 (con’t) – Redskins (add WR Roydell Williams and OT Jeremy Bridges) – The Redskins won’t have WR depth until second-year players Devin Thomas and Malcolm Kelly develop, so they take a flier on Williams, a former Titan who didn’t play last season. If he provides competition for Thomas and Kelly, he will have done his job. Bridges started 28 games at guard and tackle in Carolina over the past three seasons, but repeated legal troubles led the Panthers to cut the cord. He needs to be on a short leash, but he is good enough to at least provide quality depth.

1 – Jaguars (add QB Todd Bouman) – Bouman, a third-stringer who was let go in Baltimore after the Ravens acquired John Beck, could move up a spot to No. 2 in Jacksonville if he can beat out Cleo Lemon. You don’t want Bouman to start, but he’s a pro who knows the offense and won’t kill you as a short-term fill-in.

1 (con’t) – Cardinals (add OT Oliver Ross and TE Dominique Byrd) – Ross is a 10-year vet who spent the last two seasons on injured reserve after a decent career in Dallas and Arizona. At this point, he’s probably a long shot to contribute, but why not take a shot if you’re the Cardinals? Byrd is a former Rams prospect who didn’t play last year but could figure into a muddle tight-end situation for the Cards.

1 (con’t) – Giants (add G Tutan Reyes and TE George Wrighster) – Reyes is a huge guard who has been around since 2000. He started three games in Jacksonville last year, but he’s probably better off as a backup who provides veteran wile and can fill in in a pinch. Wrighster is another former Jaguar who has 94 career catches but is more of a backup who will fall in line behind Kevin Boss in New York.

1 (con’t) – Jets (keep TE Bubba Franks) – Franks, a former first-round pick, was an adequate blocker with the Jets last year. He should be a solid complement to receiving threat Dustin Keller once again.

1 (con’t) – Panthers (add OG Justin Geisinger) – Geisinger was a reserve for the Redskins last year, but he could find a roster spot in Carolina. The Panthers have lost their top three OL backups this offseason, and they showed last offseason a strategy bring in low-cost vets and let them compete for jobs. Geisinger at least provides such competition. He’s also the first free-agent addition of the offseason for the cap-strapped Panthers.

1 (con’t) – Rams (add WR Tim Carter) – Carter once showed potential with the Giants, but injuries kept him from making an impact. New Rams coach Steve Spagnuolo must have seen enough to remember Carter and give him another shot. Unfortunately for Carter, it’s a long shot.

1 (con’t) – Texans (add LB Boomer Grigsby) – Grigsby is an undersized ‘backer who can play inside and on special teams.

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FR: Free agency (tri)weekly review pt. 4

The big moves on the free agent market are winding down, but as they do there are a couple worth noting. So we’ll compare the moves from the last 3 weeks (March 21-April 10) to each other, with 10 being the most significant of the week and 1 being the merely mentionable. For looks at previous moves, click on the part 3 post and then follow the links there for opening weekend, week 1, and week 2 relativity comparisons.

10 – Bears (add OTs Orlando Pace and Kevin Shaffer and S Glenn Earl) – The Bears had a huge need at offensive tackle after the retirement of John Tait and the departure of John St. Clair via free agency. Pace has battled injuries in recent years, but he stayed on the field for most of last season for the Rams. But St. Louis lurched into full rebuilding mode, and so Pace was cut. He lands in Chicago, where he will likely start at left tackle unless ‘08 first-rounder Chris Williams has taken 2 or 3 quantum leaps forward. With Pace, Williams, she Kevin Shaffer now on board, the Bears should be OK at tackle this year even given the injury histories of all three guys. It makes sense for the Bears to spend on Pace since so much is riding on Cutler’s performance and thus his protection. Shaffer can be a solid right tackle. His addition gives the Bears the flexibility  to put signee Frank Omiyale inside at guard, which would strengthen that spot as well. Shaffer, who was cut by Cleveland, could take the place of St. Clair, the guy who took his spot with the Browns. Earl once had promise, but he missed the last two years with injury. He’s worth a flier on a one-year deal to see if he’s healthy.

9 – Texans (add DT Shaun Cody and LBs Cato June and Buster Davis) – Cody, a former second-round pick, comes to Houston from Detroit as the second key defensive line addition of the offseason for the Texans (along with DE Antonio Smith). Cody will be more of a run-stuffer, but with Smith, Mario Williams, and Amobi Okoye, that’s precisely what the Texans need. Don’t be shocked if Cody isn’t part of the most improved defensive line in the league next year. He won’t be the most important part, but there’s definitely a role for him to play there. June, who has started in Indianapolis and Tampa Bay, is a classic weak-side linebacker in a 4-3 set. He’ll fit in as a likely starter in Houston and should be a minor step up. Davis is from that same system, so he should provide depth as well.

8 – none

7 – Ravens (kept CB Samari Rolle and QB Todd Bouman) – The Ravens had cut Rolle in a salary-cap move earlier this offseason, and they replaced him (and Chris McAlister) by signing Dominique Foxworth and Chris Carr to join Fabian Washington. Rolle isn’t the lockdown guy he used to be, but he’s a veteran hand who can still fit in as a contributor.  Bouman has started in the league, but his value is as a veteran third-stringer who lends some advice and experience to youngsters Joe Flacco and Troy Smith.

7 – Raiders (add QB Jeff Garcia and OT Marcus Johnson) – We’ve seen a lot of backup quarterback moves this offseason (including Kyle Boller to St. Louis and Patrick Ramsey to Tennessee this week), but this is the strangest. First of all, Garcia’s West Coast, dink-and-dunk style is a polar opposite to big-armed starter JaMarcus Russell. And while it might seem on the surface that Garcia could help mentor Russell, that’s never really been Garcia’s deal. He’s a good quarterback who wants to play and play well, and so his own play is his biggest concern. Maybe Garcia, now 39, has had a change of heart, but I doubt it. The temptation for the Raiders is going to be to play Garcia, because he will give them a better chance to win right away. Garcia is apt to fall into that tempting mindset too, which could cause a quarterback controversy. But Oakland must develop Russell if they are going anywhere anytime soon. So this move is just as likely to blow up in the Raiders’ faces as it is to work. But the impact of it keeps it high in this comparison.

6 – 49ers (add OT Marvel Smith) – Smith was a starter in Pittsburgh, but injuries limited him to just 17 games over the past two years. He now returns home to the Bay Area to replace Jonas Jennings as the 49ers’ right tackle. If Smith can stay healthy, this will be an upgrade for Frisco – bu that’s a big if.

6 (con’t) – Saints (add S Pierson Prioleau and DT Rod Coleman; kept QB Joey Harrington) – Prioleau is a borderline starting safetywho will replace Kevin Kaesviharn. That’s a minor upgrade, but with S Darren Sharper and CB Jabari Greer now in town, the Saints believed continuing the secondary overhaul would help in the long run. Coleman sat out last year, but he is a former Pro Bowler who is reunited with his Atlanta DL coach Bill Kollar. If he’s healthy, he’ll help a lot, but even becoming a situational pass rusher from the inside would be a benefit for the Saints. Harrington is nothing more than a third-string quarterback at this point.

5 – Redskins (kept DE Phillip Daniels; add LB Robert Thomas) – Washington cut Daniels earlier this offseason in a cap-related move but brought him back at a minimum salary. Daniels and fellow graybeard Renaldo Wynn will provide experienced depth at defensive end, and both are still good for 10-15 plays a game. Thomas is a vet who fits in as a backup.

5 (con’t) – Bengals (add DT Tank Johnson) – Johnson’s time in Dallas was fairly calm after his tumultous tenure in Chicago. While off-the-field problems have plagued Johnson, he’s a good rotation defensive tackle with a little bit of pass rushing upside. His talent is an upgrade for Cincy if he can stay on the field.

4- Rams (add QB Kyle Boller and TE Billy Bajema; kept OL Adam Goldberg) – Boller got a horrible rap in Baltimore, and he was far from consistent, but the former first-round pick also showed moments of promise. He comes in as the backup for Marc Bulger, and some teams still think Boller’s upside is worth a shot. I tend to agree. Bajema is a block-first tight end who the Rams want to use as a complement to Randy McMichael. Goldberg isn’t a starter, but he’s a valuable backup who actually started games at four different positions on the line for the Rams last year. He’ll be around as an insurance swingman for the next two years with his new deal.

4 (con’t) – Packers (add C-OG Duke Preston) – The Packers never seem to spend on free agents, so when they sign one it sticks out like a sore thumb. Preston started 11 games at center for the Bills last year, and the Packers think he can contribute at either center or guard. Expect him to be a starter next season.

4 (con’t) – Jets (add CB Donald Strickland) – Strickland, who was in San Francisco last year, has bounced around quite a bit. He’s probably a fourth corner who can move up to nickelback in a pinch. Thankfully, that’s what the Jets have planned for him, as Strickland will be behind Darrelle Revis and Lito Sheppard in the pecking order.

4 (con’t) – Chiefs (add OL Mike Goff) – Goff has been a starter his entire 11-year career, but his play has begun falling off to the point where it might be better for him to come off the bench. He’s proficient at playing guard or center, so he should fit in well as a swingman in K.C.

3 – Lions (keep OT George Foster; add C Dylan Gandy) – Foster, a former first-round pick, lost his starting job last year but is still an OK backup tackle.

3 (con’t) – Browns (add WR David Patten) – Patten won’t replace Joe Jurevicius, who was cut, much less Donte Stallworth, who faces charges after a lethal traffic accident. But this 13-year veteran, who played in Cleveland back in 2000, can be an adequate fourth receiver. This move will help as long as Patten isn’t asked to do much more.

3 (con’t) – Colts (keep LB Tyjuan Hagler, add LB Adam Seward) – Hagler returns to back up at all three linebacker positions, but don’t be surprised if he ends up starting outside. In a year with a lot of change on defense, having Hagler around is a bit of a security blanket for the Colts. Seward is a sturdy inside ‘backer who never broke through in Carolina. He’s slated to back up Gary Brackett in Indy. These moves help, but the Colts still have work to do before their linebacker corps is ready for action.

2 – Titans (add QB Patrick Ramsey) – Ramsey, a former first-rounder in Washington who settled in as a backup in Denver, comes to Tennessee to replace Chris Simms. He’s a favorite of returning Titans offensive coordinator Mike Heimerdinger, who spent time with him in Denver. Ramsey is certainly good enough to back up Kerry Collins, and so his presence will put a lot of pressure on Vince Young to get better. If Young doesn’t, he could be a third quarterback with no chance of seeing the field in ’09.

2 (con’t) – Cardinals (add FB Dan Kreider; kept CB Ralph Brown) – Kreider, a Ram last year, spent most of his career with the Steelers, and so he knows Cards head coach Ken Whisenhunt. He’s a useful role player. Brown is another vet who the Cards are keeping around on a one-year deal. He doesn’t need to start now that Arizona added Bryant McFadden to ’08 rookie sensation Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, but Brown can fill in as a nickelback in a pinch.

1- Vikings (kept FB Naufahu Tahi and DE Otis Grigsby) – The Vikings matched Cincinnati’s offer sheet for Tahi, a block-first fullback who stepped into the lineup the second half of last year. He allows the Vikings flexibility with their sets and can help pave the way for Adrian Peterson and Chester Taylor. Grisby was non-tendered as a free agent, but the Vikings were willing to bring him back for less money to be a backup.

1 (con’t) – Steelers (kept LB Keyaron Fox) – Fox got a two-year deal to hang around as a backup in Pittsburgh. He’s an asset on special teams, but he’s not special on defense.

1 (con’t) – Bills (add OG Seth McKinney) – McKinney shouldn’t start, but he’s a versatile interior lineman who won’ t kill you in a pinch.

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