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Training camp cuts roundup

Jerricho Cotchery of the New York Jets running...

Ex-Jet Jerricho Cotchery. Image via Wikipedia

In this post, we’ll discuss the players released during training camp. This will include players cut until the first cutdown on August 30. (For players released earlier, check out this link to our pre-camp cuts analysis.)

Vikings (cut OT Bryant McKinnie)We discussed McKinnie’s release in this post.

Cowboys (cut C Andre Gurode) – Gurode has made the Pro Bowl the last five years, but the nine-year vet’s play no longer matches his price tag. It’ll be interesting to see what contingency plan the Cowboys have in mind, but it’s clear that Gurode still has enough in the tank to be at least an above-average center for someone.

Bills (cut OLB Aaron Maybin) – Maybin, a former first-round pick, was an utter disappointment in Buffalo. He never provided much of a pass rush, and so his impact was negligible. His talent may earn him a look elsewhere, but it’s hard to see someone who was such a complete bust completely turning his career around. The Bills, under a regime different than the one that drafted Maybin, cut the cord after two seasons, indicating they thought he was a hopeless case.

Jets (cut WR Jerricho Cotchery) – Cotchery has been a decent starter for the Jets, but after the Jets spent big money for Santonio Holmes and Plaxico Burress, his price tag proved to be too much. So the Jets (who also lost Braylon Edwards and Brad Smith) will likely try to add a veteran as the third receiver until Jeremy Kerley develops. Cotchery latched on with the Steelers.

Saints (cut OT Jon Stinchcomb and DE Alex Brown) – Stinchcomb had started every game at right tackle the past five seasons for the Saints, and he made a Pro Bowl just two seasons ago in 2009. But his play slipped last year, and he’s not the heavy-duty run blocker the Saints seem to prefer at this point. So New Orleans saved $2 million plus and released him. Still, he’s good enough to start elsewhere, especially for a West Coast offense team. Brown, whom the Saints added last season, is a decent starting defensive end because he’s OK against both the pass and the run, but he’s no longer an impact guy. He lost his job as the Saints upgraded across the D-line and his pricetag no longer matched his expected contribution.

Bengals (cut DT Tank Johnson, CB Fred Bennett and QB Jordan Palmer) – The Bengals gave the troubled defensive tackle a chance, and it worked out beautifully in 2009. But last season, Johnson’s performance fell off. If he can prove he’s healthy and stay on his best behavior, Johnson could still latch on as a backup DT elsewhere. Bennett, a former Texans starter, has completely fallen off the map. Palmer (the brother of Carson Palmer) lost a roster spot after the additions of Andy Dalton and Bruce Gradkowski. 

Titans (cut DT Jovan Haye) – Haye was a starter for the Titans in 2008-2009, but he lost his starting gig last year and then lost his roster spot this year. Still, he provides experience at a position of need, so he should find a job somewhere.

Broncos (cut RB LenDale White) – The Broncos signed White after the Titans and Seahawks gave up on him, but he got hurt last preseason and missed the entire year. After adding Willis McGahee, White became expendable for Denver.

Steelers (cut WR Limas Sweed) – Sweed, a former second-round pick, was supposed to replace Plaxico Burress in the Steelers’ offense, but injuries and inconsistency limited his impact. Instead, later draftees like Mike Wallace, Emmanuel Sanders, and Antonio Brown emerged, making Sweed extraneous. Some team will really be looking at the way-back machine if it is to give him a second chance.

Ravens (cut FB Jason McKie and OT Oniel Cousins) – McKie is a decent fullback, but after the Ravens upgraded with Vonta Leach, he became expendable. Given the dearth of teams that use a fullback, McKie could have trouble finding work. Cousins entered camp as a potential starter at right tackle but lost the job and then a roster spot. The addition of Bryant McKinnie made Cousins an expendable piece.

Eagles (cut DE Ricky Sapp) – Sapp, a fifth-round pick in 2010, was battling knee injuries and roster depth before he left the Eagles early in camp. Given their depth, the Eagles decided to cut Sapp instead of keeping his rights.

Patriots (cut safeties Brandon McGowan and James Sanders) – McGowan, who was a starter at free safety for the Patriots in 2009, had fallen behind youngsters Patrick Chung and Brandon Meriwether at the position. So he was released. The more surprising cut was Sanders, who was a starter and a regular last year and a starter in the third preseason game two days before his release. He’s still good enough to fit in somewhere.

Redskins (cut PK Shayne Graham) – Graham lost out in a kicking competition with Graham Gano. The vet will likely become an injury replacement somewhere before the season is out.

Rams (cut LBs David Vobora and Na’il Diggs) – Vobora, a former Mr. Irrelevant, was a stat-minded favorite, but his talent wasn’t going to justify a roster spot. It’ll be interesting to see if an analytics-driven team gives him a shot. (UPDATE: Seattle did.) Diggs is a solid veteran who is a replacement level starter at best. He will find work as an injury fill-in at some point.

Lions (cut RB Mike Bell, DT Montavious Stanley, and PK Dave Rayner) – Bell, one of the running backs whom the Lions signed after Mikel Leshoure’s injury, failed to make an impact to win a job. Stanley provides decent depth at tackle but lost a job on Detroit’s deep line. Rayner did a good job filling in for Jason Hanson last year, but Hanson’s back for his 20th year in Detroit.

Jaguars (cut WR Tiquan Underwood) – Underwood, a former sixth-round pick, becomes the first draft pick of the Gene Smith era to be cut in Jacksonville. His three years were underwhelming, and the Jags have added a ton of other receivers in the draft since he was selected.

Bears (cut DE Vernon Gholston and DT Tank Tyler) – Tyler, an ex-Chief and Panther, has never lived up to his draft status as he’s bounced around the league. But he’s not nearly the bust that Gholston, a former sixth overall pick, was. The Bears took a shot on Gholston as a reclamation project, but it obviously didn’t take. (Meanwhile, Amobi Okoye, a similar case, has performed pretty well.)

Chargers (cut LS David Binn) – Binn played 17 years for the Chargers, but he’s always been small for a long snapper and no longer holds up. The Chargers’ special teams problems last season ultimately led to many changes, including this one.

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Week 2 Moves

We do a weekly update on major NFL transactions. We’ll include signings, releases, and also players who are put on injured reserve, because they are lost for the year. You can check out the Week 1 transactions here.

Additions

Chargers (add DT Alfonso Boone) – Boone comes in to help the effort to replace NT Jamal Williams, who was put on IR after Week 1. He played for current Chargers defensive coordinator Ron Rivera in Chicago, so Rivera knows Boone’s strengths and weaknesses enough to put him in a role he can succeed in.

Ravens (add TE Tony Curtis) – Baltimore added Curtis, who showed a few flashes of potential in Philly, as a backup tight end. Curtis will help fill in for his ex-Eagle teammate L.J. Smith, who just can’t seem to stay healthy.

Browns (add TE Greg Estandia) – The Browns gave up on ’08 fourth-rounder Martin Rucker (whom they traded an ’09 third-rounder to draft) and picked up Estandia, who was released in Jacksonville to make way for rookie Zach Miller. Estandia, a third-year player,  is 6-foot-8 and has 19 catches over the past two years, so he brings some more veteran experience behind Steve Heiden and Robert Royal.

Panthers (add DT Antwan Burton) – Carolina, which had already lost starting DT Maake Kemeoatu in the offseason, lost replacement Louis Leonard to a broken ankle in Week 2 vs. Atlanta. Leonard is now on IR. To fill his roster spot, Carolina added Burton, who was with St. Louis and Kansas City last season and who last played for Denver in ’07. The Panthers will need Burton to at least play in a rotation, but expecting him to do more than fill space is unrealistic.

Packers (add S Matt Giordano) – Giordano, a four-year pro, replaces Aaron Rouse, who started against Cincinnati in Week 2 as a fill-in but was just a backup. With Nick Collins banged up and Atari Bigby out for a few weeks, the Packers will need Giordano to step in and play right away at least in a role.

Patriots (trade for OLB Prescott Burgess) – The Patriots traded a seventh-round pick to add Burgess, who has played in Baltimore the last two years. Burgess has played primarily on special teams in his three-year career but could help fill in with a Patriots LB corps that’s thinner with the departures of Tedy Bruschi and Mike Vrabel and the injury to Jerod Mayo. That’s worth the shot of a seventh-round pick to New England.

Texans (add S Bernard Pollard) – Pollard started in Kansas City last year, but he was caught up in the Chiefs’ roster turnover this season. Now he moves to Houston to play for his former Chiefs’ secondary coach. Pollard is a physical player who can definitely help on special teams if not in the secondary.

Buccaneers (add S Corey Lynch and CB Marcus Hamilton) – With its secondary in flux after the injury to Jermaine Phillips and the suspension of Tanard Jackson, Tampa Bay brought in reinforcements. Lynch and Hamilton don’t have big resumes, but they at least add depth.

Titans (add P Reggie Hodges) – With veteran Craig Hentrich hurting, Tennessee needed a fill-in punter. Hodges punted for the Jets last year. He’s not great, but he’s OK in the short term.

Subtractions

Falcons (put DT Peria Jerry on IR) – Jerry, the Falcons’ first-round pick out of Ole Miss, suffered a knee injury against Carolina that will cost him the rest of the season. That’s a big blow to the Falcons, who don’t have great D-line depth. Atlanta promoted Vance Walker off the practice squad to take Jerry’s roster spot, but Walker (a local product out of Georgia Tech) can’t fill Jerry’s shoes.

Jaguars (put WR Troy Williamson on IR, demote WR Nate Hughes to practice squad) – Williamson, a former first-round bust in Minnesota, had a solid preseason and had earned a role in the Jags’ WR rotation, but a torn labrum against Arizona ended his season. The Jags also demoted Hughes, who dropped two passes in the end zone against the Cardinals, and signed Tiquan Underwood for depth. The changes mean that rookies Jarrett Dillard and Mike Thomas will have to step up and play behind Torry Holt and Mike Sims-Walker.

Buccaneers (put S Jermaine Phillips on IR) – Phillips suffered a broken thumb, and instead of waiting 6-8 weeks for his return, the Bucs shelved him for the season. That’s a big blow for a team that’s already missing starting safety Tanard Jackson with a league suspension and that has looked simply awful in pass coverage through two games this season.

Bills (put TE Derek Schouman and ORT Brad Butler on IR) – Butler, the Bills’ starting right tackle, suffered a knee injury that will cost him the rest of the season. That’s a big deal because Butler was one of just two OL starters in Buffalo with game experience prior to 2009. The Bills did add Jamon Meredith off the Packers’ practice squad to take Butler’s roster spot. Schouman, the team’s No. 2 tight end, also suffered a season-ending knee injury.

Redskins (put OG Randy Thomas on IR) – Thomas, the Redskins’ starter at right guard, suffered a right triceps injury and will miss the season. That’s a huge blow for the Redskins, because none of Washington’s backup offensive linemen played even a snap in 2008. It’ll be hard for the Redskins to replace Thomas’ solid run-blocking presence on the interior of their O-line.

Texans (put OG Chester Pitts on IR) – Pitts has been a dependable blocker for Houston, starting 114 consecutive games – which is every game in team history. The Texans have been working on improving their offensive line, which was abysmal early in their history, but depth is still a concern.

Giants (put S Kenny Phillips on IR) – Phillips, a former first-round pick who was emerging as an impact guy in his second season, intercepted two passes vs. Dallas in Week 2, returning one for a touchdown. But he also has been fighting a balky knee that will now shelve him for the year. That’s a big blow for the Giants’ young and talented secondary. To replace Phillips, the Giants claimed Aaron Rouse off waivers from Green Bay. Rouse started in Week 2 against Cincinnati but struggled. Still, he adds depth for the Giants.

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Fantasy Football: The Rookies

As we continue our fantasy football coverage, I thought we’d take a moment to compare this year’s rookies. We’re going to do this on a Football Relativity scale, with 10 being the rookie who will make the most fantasy impact this year and 1 being a rookie who is worth noticing in your draft preparation but probably won’t make a huge impact. We’ll also include several bonus names just in case you play in a 47-team league.

You can follow our other Fantasy Football coverage for the ’09 season through this category link.

10 – RB Knowshon Moreno, Broncos – Moreno is the one rookie who has a chance to be an elite fantasy force this year. (You can see how he compares to other major running backs in this post.) Moreno is supremely talented, and the other backs in Denver – most notably Correll Buckhalter and Lamont Jordan – aren’t really candidates to steal a majority of carries from Moreno. I still believe that Moreno was a luxury pick for the Broncos in the draft, but he’s in a situation where he can be a quality pick for you in your fantasy draft. He’s a top-25 overall player, and there’s a big gap between him and the next rookie who should be considered in a fantasy league.

9 – none

8 – RB Chris “Beanie” Wells, Cardinals – Wells wasn’t the second running back taken in the draft, but he should be the second rookie back taken in fantasy drafts this year because of opportunity. With Edgerrin James gone, Wells and Tim Hightower are the two candidates for Cardinals carries, and that’s a battle Wells could win. I expect Wells to get 50-65 percent of Arizona’s carries, and in an offense that potent, that could result in numbers that make him a borderline fantasy starter and a top 20 or 25 running back. Wells is a guy who’s worth taking a round or even two rounds higher than most projections would suggest.

7 – WR Darrius Heyward-Bey, Raiders – Heyward-Bey was a reach with the seventh overall pick, but the Raiders will use him. He has great speed and is a downfield threat, and QB JaMarcus Russell has the arm to get him the ball. Given that, I think HeyBey has the best chance of any rookie receiver to be a fantasy starter as a rookie. I don’t expect HeyBey (and yes, that’s what we’re going to call him here on the site) to lead rookies in catches or receiving yards, but I do expect him to lead freshman wideouts in TD catches. Something like 40 catches with a high yards-per-catch average and 6-8 touchdowns sounds about right. If you’re in a 14-to-16 team league, HeyBey is the kind of guy I’d want as a backup receiver or even as a No. 3 wideout because he can score at any time.

6 – RB LeSean McCoy, Eagles – McCoy, a second-round pick, is backing up Brian Westbrook. Westbrook has gotten hurt often enough lately that McCoy should get some carries, and McCoy is talented enough to capitalize on them. McCoy looks to be a guy who will be a good start 3-4 times this year when Westbrook is sidelined, and that makes him a good backup option for your fantasy team.

6 (con’t) – WR Michael Crabtree, 49ers – Crabtree is a big, physical receiver who looks primed to start from the start in San Francisco. While he will likely face many of the growing pains other receivers encounter, Crabtree should still notch 50 catches or so as a rookie. And if he catches on quickly, his physical ability gives him a lot of upside. You could do worse than drafting Crabtree for the final WR spot on your bench.

5 – RB Donald Brown, Colts – Brown was a first-round pick, but he will likely have a bit of a harder time finding a role in his rookie year than Moreno or Wells. Brown is a do-everything back who will spell Joseph Addai, but it’s hard to see Brown reaching 50-50 status in terms of carries unless Addai gets dinged up. So Brown is a good guy to have on your bench, but you don’t want to rely on him as a starter. In keeper leagues, though, Brown’s value goes up, because you get the sense that the Colts aren’t thrilled with Addai and may want to replace him sooner rather than later.

5 (con’t) – WR Percy Harvin, Vikings – Harvin has had a tumultous offseason, but the Vikings are excited about finding ways to put his speed on display this fall. The fact that he can make big plays as a receiver, running back, returner, or even as a Wildcat-formation quarterback enhances his fantasy value. He definitely should be drafted in all but the smallest leagues, but don’t depend on Harvin to be an every-week starter until you see exactly what his role will be. Still, even with the growing pains every receiver faces, if you are ever stuck for a starter, Harvin is a good option as a fill-in because he is so potent when he gets the ball in his hands.

4 – QB Matthew Stafford, Lions – Rookie quarterbacks generally aren’t worth a great investment, but once Stafford takes over the starting role, it’s not outlandish to expect at least one TD pass a week to Calvin Johnson because Johnson is so freakishly good. So if you have one of the top 2-3 quarterbacks, Stafford is a decent option as a late-round backup QB who you’ll only play on your starter’s bye week.

4 (con’t) – TE Cornelius Ingram, Eagles – Ingram fell to the fifth round in the NFL draft because of a knee injury, but he’s healthy now and is probably the best pass-catching prospect among this year’s rookie tight ends. It’s not out of the realm of possibility to see him as a fantasy starter by mid-October. If you’re looking for upside at tight end, Ingram’s one to watch.

4 (con’t) – WR Austin Collie, Colts – If we had to identify one fantasy sleeper among the rookie receivers, it would be Collie. Collie played in a pro-style system at Purdue, and he faces little opposition to step up to become the third receiver in Indy pretty quickly. If he wins that role, he could post 30 or 40 catches, which combined with his upside could make him a backup-worthy player. And if Reggie Wayne or Anthony Gonzalez gets hurt, Collie is definitely a name to watch.

3 – RB Glen Coffee, 49ers – Coffee was a productive back at Alabama, and he looks to be Frank Gore’s primary backup in San Francisco. So he’s at least worth a pick as a handcuff, and given Gore’s injury history he may be worth a flier even if you don’t draft Gore early.

3 (con’t) – QB Mark Sanchez, Jets – Sanchez is probably more likely to start Game One than Stafford is, but for some reason I think Sanchez’s ceiling is about 15 touchdown passes as a rookie. A season like Joe Flacco’s rookie campaign (just under 3,000 yards and 14 touchdowns) is reasonable to expect, but that’s a third-string fantasy QB in most leagues. Again, in a keeper league, Sanchez is definitely a guy to take.

3 (con’t) – WRs Mohammed Massaquoi and Brian Robiskie, Browns – Cleveland spent two second-round picks on rebuilding their receiving corps. Massaquoi is the more physically talented of these two receivers, but Robiskie’s experience and technique (his dad is a longtime NFL receiver coach) could help him make an impact more quickly. One of these guys will probably end up starting across from Braylon Edwards, and so whichever one wins that job becomes a fantasy prospect.

3 (con’t) – WR Jeremy Maclin, Eagles – Maclin is a gamebreaker who could make a big impact right away. However, he’s got a bit of a transition from the relatively simple routes he ran at Missouri to the precise routes of the West Coast offense Philly uses. Still, he’s worth a draft pick, especially considering the big rookie season that his new teammate DeSean Jackson had last year. I don’t see Maclin matching Jackson’s rookie year, but Maclin is still a draftable prospect.

3 (con’t) – TE Chase Coffman, Bengals – Like Ingram, Coffman was a productive college player who fell a bit in the draft because of injury concerns. But he’s a real pass-catcher who moves to a pro team that has no strong tight end option in front of him. Coffman is a legit spot starter at tight end and could be a more regular fantasy option by midseason.

2 – RB Shonn Greene, Jets – Greene has a lot of talent, but it doesn’t look as though he’ll have a lot of opportunity as a rookie because he’s behind Thomas Jones and Leon Washington. So we’ll note his name, and if you draft Jones, consider adding Greene to your team late.

2 (con’t) – QB Pat White, Dolphins – It’s hard to tell what White’s role is going to be. He has great speed, but he probably won’t see snaps except in the Wildcat formation. The fact that Ronnie Brown can go under center in the Wildcat could limit White’s opportunities. White may be worth a flier to some, but we’re not among them. Let someone else take this risk in your fantasy draft.

2 (con’t) – TE Brandon Pettigrew, Lions – Pettigrew was the only tight end selected in the first round, and he’s the most likely rookie tight end to start Week One. But his role will be as much blocking as receiving, especially given the tenuous state of the Lions’ offensive line. That will likely limit his receiving numbers as a rookie. Pettigrew may merit consideration as a spot starter, but his fantasy impact in 2009 looks limited.

2 (con’t) – WR Hakeem Nicks, Giants – Nicks is a good prospect long-term, but given the experience the Giants return at receiver (Steve Smith, Domenik Hixon, and Mario Manningham), and given the usual adjustment period rookie receivers need, he’s unlikely to make a huge fantasy impact in ’09. He’s worth noting, especially if Steve Smith gets hurt for some reason, but he’s probably draftable only in huge leagues or keeper leagues.

2 (con’t) – WR Kenny Britt, Titans – Britt is a first-round pick who should eventually find a starting role in Tennessee, but he’s unlikely to put up big numbers in a run-first offense as a rookie. With free-agent signee Nate Washington and Justin Gage in front of him, Britt looks to be a third receiver at best in ’09, which makes him a fantasy afterthought unless there’s an injury.

2 (con’t) – WRs Mike Thomas, Jarrett Dillard and Tiquan Underwood, Jaguars – The Jags razed their receiving corps in the offseason and are starting anew. Ex-Ram Torry Holt and holdover Mike Thomas figure to start, but one of Jax’s rookies will play a big role. Our guess is that Thomas is the most likely rookie to emerge, but watch Dillard and Underwood to make sure that one of them doesn’t explode onto the scene in training camp.

2 (con’t) – WR Juaquin Iglesias, Bears – Iglesias could end up as a starter or at least a rotation player in Chicago right away because the Bears’ receiving depth chart is so flimsy right now. He was a productive guy at Oklahoma and could be a 20-30 catch guy immediately, especially with Jay Cutler bringing more passing prowess into town. So if you’re in a big league, keep an eye on Iglesias as a late-round prospect.

1 – RB Andre Brown, Giants – Brown has a chance to step into the Giants’ Earth, Wind, and Fire trio as the replacement for Derrick Ward, the former Fire who moved to Tampa Bay in the offseason. Still, unless Brandon Jacobs misses time, it’s hard to see Brown getting more than a handful of carries a game.

1 (con’t) – WR Ramses Barden, Giants – Hakeem Nicks isn’t much of a prospect, and Barden is less experienced and played lesser competition in college. But Barden’s huge size (6-foot-6) could find him a minor red-zone role. I could see him having the kind of season that James Hardy had in Buffalo last year (9 catches but 2 touchdowns), or maybe a touchdown or two more. So keep an eye on Barden’s development just in case.

1 (con’t) – WRs Brian Hartline and Patrick Turner, Dolphins – We’re going to mention Hartline and Turner as a group entry. There’s room in Miami for one of them to emerge as a starter outside, and if that happens that rookie could end up being a fantasy consideration. So watch their camp battle and see if one of these rookies seems to emerge.

1 (con’t) – RB James Davis, Browns – The Browns have every-down back Jamal Lewis returning, but they let Jason Wright go in the offseason, which opens the door for Davis to be Lewis’ primary backup. And with Lewis’ age, it’s important to know who his backup is. So Davis is a handcuff option for Lewis owners, and the rookie may even be worth a flier in deep leagues as an option to stash until midseason to see what his role becomes.

Other rookies whose names you should know but probably not draft, unless you’re in one of those 47-team leagues…

RBs Mike Goodson (Carolina), Rashad Jennings (Jacksonville)

WRs Deon Butler (Seattle), Louis Murphy (Oakland), Brandon Tate (New England), Derrick Williams (Detroit), Mike Wallace (Pittsburgh), Johnny Knox (Chicago), Brooks Foster (St. Louis), Sammie Stroughter (Tampa Bay)

TEs Travis Beckum (N.Y. Giants), James Casey (Houston), Jared Cook (Tennessee), Richard Quinn (Broncos)

PK Ryan Succop (Kansas City)

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