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The problem with the NFL on CBS

The NFL Today's Boomer Esiason during the Supe...

Boomer Esiason, part of CBS' 1980s brigade. Image via Wikipedia

One of our most popular posts this offseason has been our update on new and moved NFL announcers. And if you go through that post, you’ll notice that CBS has only one entry – Marv Albert replacing Gus Johnson as a play-by-play voice. CBS shuffled its pairings a bit, but the faces and voices are the same.

And that’s the problem with the NFL on CBS. The Eye network has remained so faithful to its announcers that its announcers are becoming irrelevant. As a result, CBS’s coverage sounds aged, spouting cliches and strategies of years gone by instead of the trends of the current day. And that’s because CBS’s analysts haven’t been in the league for years. None of the 12 analysts (studio and game) that CBS announced for 2011 has been in the NFL in the last four seasons. Only one – Bill Cowher – has been in the NFL within seven seasons. And CBS only has three analysts – Rich Gannon, Steve Beuerlein, and Shannon Sharpe – who played in the 2000s. (See below for more details.)

This isn’t the approach other networks take. Fox, for example, has added players like John Lynch, Chad Pennington, and Michael Strahan, as well as coaches like Brian Billick and Jim Mora to its NFL Sunday crew in recents years. The two dominant franchises of the 2000s – the Colts and Patriots – are represented by Tony Dungy and Rodney Harrison on NBC’s Football Night in America. And ESPN and the NFL Network regularly add recently retired players who bring fresh insight and relevant anecdotes.

CBS, meanwhile, trots out the same old, same old from Dan Dierdorf – and features it on its No. 2 team. It relies on quarterbacks from the 1980s – Dan Marino, Boomer Esiason, and Phil Simms – as its stars. The age shows, as CBS game viewers settle for traditional, surface analysis far too often.

Will CBS ever have a changing of the guard among its analysts? Or do the veterans on the squad have lifetime contracts? Like the NFL itself, NFL announcers should have to fight off a new crop of rookies year after year. But at CBS, they don’t.

And until CBS gets its eye off the past when it comes to NFL announcers, its coverage won’t be anywhere close to what it needs to be.

The last year game analysts were in the NFL (as players or coaches)

CBS: Dan Marino 1999, Boomer Esiason 1997, Bill Cowher 2006, Shannon Sharpe 2003, Phil Simms 1993, Dan Dierdorf 1983, Dan Fouts 1987, Rich Gannon 2004, Solomon Wilcots 1992, Steve Tasker 1997, Steve Beuerlein 2003, Randy Cross 1988

FOX: Howie Long 1993, Terry Bradshaw 1983, Jimmy Johnson 1999, Michael Strahan 2007, Troy Aikman 2000, Daryl Johnston 1999, Tony Siragusa 2001, Brian Billick 2007, John Lynch 2007, Tim Ryan 1993, Jim Mora 2009, Chad Pennington 2010, Charles Davis DNP

NBC: Cris Collinsworth 1988, Tony Dungy 2008, Rodney Harrison 2008

NFL Network: Mike Mayock 1983, Marshall Faulk 2005, Steve Mariucci 2005, Warren Sapp 2007, Michael Irvin 1999, Kurt Warner 2009

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RP: Trading for backup quarterbacks

Kevin Kolb

Trade target Kevin Kolb. Image via Wikipedia

In the midst of the NFL lockout, one rumor that won’t go away is that the Eagles are looking to deal backup QB Kevin Kolb to a team that wants to make him a starter. Kolb, who is signed to a reasonable contract and who sits behind Michael Vick on the depth chart, says he’s ready to start, and his performance in fill-in performances supports that belief. And Eagles head coach Andy Reid seems open to granting Kolb’s trade wish if the price is right.

But is this wise for the Eagles? And is trading for Kolb a good move for a quarterback needy team? Let’s do a research project to see the results other trades in which teams dealt for someone else’s backup quarterback and made him a starter.
*If  you can think of an example we forgot, leave a comment and we’ll add it in below.

2010 – Chargers trade Charlie Whitehurst and 2010 second-round pick (60th overall) to Seahawks for 2010 second-round pick (40th overall) and 2011 third-round pick – Whitehurst, a former third-round pick, was never going to surpass Philip Rivers in San Diego, but he had also fallen behind vet Billy Volek on the depth chart. So when the Seahawks wanted Whitehurst to compete for their starting job, the Bolts made the deal. The Seahawks didn’t give up as much as other teams had for QBs they knew would start for them, but it was a fairly hefty price for an unproven backup. In his first year in Seattle, Whitehurst couldn’t beat out veteran Matt Hasselbeck, and he started just two games. While his numbers weren’t great, he did lead the Hawks to a Week 17 victory over St. Louis to clinch a playoff spot. Hasselbeck is now a free agent, and the Seahawks want to keep him, which speaks to Whitehurst’s current value. But the jury is still out on whether Seattle got what it paid for in this deal.

2009 – Patriots trade Matt Cassel and LB Mike Vrabel to Chiefs for second-round pick (34th overall) – Cassel, who had been a backup at USC and with the Patriots, got his chance to play in 2008 when Tom Brady suffered a season-ending injury in Week 1. Cassel acquited himself well, to the point that the Patriots put the franchise tag on him after the season. That was really a move to protect his value, and New England soon traded Cassel to Kansas City for an early second-round pick. That was a pretty nice return on investement for the Pats, who were obviously going to turn back to Brady as their starter. Cassel struggled a bit in his first year as a starter, but he really came on in 2010 to show he can be at least an above-average NFL starting QB. At this point, K.C. has to be thrilled to have Cassel, even after paying a hefty price.

2007 – Falcons trade Matt Schaub and 2007 10th overall pick to Texans for 2007 8th overall pick, 2007 second-round pick, and 2008 second-round pick – This is the one example that worked out far better for the team acquiring the backup quarterback. Schaub had started two games behind Michael Vick in Atlanta before the Falcons were able to get a pretty nice ransom for the former fourth-round pick. Schaub went on to the Texans, where he supplaned disappointing No. 1 overal pick David Carr. Schaub has developed into a prolific passer and has started every game when healthy over the past four seasons. The Falcons, meanwhile, didn’t know that their first season without Schaub would also be their first season without Vick, whose legal troubles began that year. So under first-year head coach Bobby Petrino, Atlanta started a poo-poo platter of Joey Harrington, Chris Redman, and Byron Leftwich that season. Petrino bailed and went to Arkansas, and the Falcons ended up drafting Matt Ryan as their new franchise QB. Atlanta bounced back from this trade, but it was as disastrous at first for the Falcons as it was shrewd for the Texans.

2004 – Eagles trade A.J. Feeley to Dolphins for 2005 second-round pick – Andy Reid learned from Ron Wolf, the GM of the team he had been an assistant coach for, when it came to trading quarterbacks. So once Donovan McNabb was an established starter, Reid dealt third-stringer Feeley to the Dolphins for a pretty high price – a second-rounder. Feeley had been a fifth-round pick, but when McNabb and backup Koy Detmer were injured in 2002, Feeley went 4-1 as a starter, helping the Eagles land a playoff berth. He was stuck on the bench another year before the Dolphins anted up to get him. But Feeley started just eight games in Miami and played poorly, losing the starting job to Jay Fiedler as coach Dave Wannstedt got forced out. Within two years, Feeley was gone. The Eagles, meanwhile, got WR Reggie Brown out of the deal as a draft pick, and actually got Feeley back as a backup a few years later. Philly won in this deal, and Miami definitely lost.

2001 – Packers trade Matt Hasselbeck plus 2001 17th overall pick and seventh-round pick to Seahawks for 2001 10th overall pick and third-round pick – Hasselbeck was the third Packers backup under Brett Favre who was traded to become a starter elsewhere, and he was the most valuable. For one, GM Wolf had built up the value of his backups enough to show that they were worthwhile investments for trading partners. Plus, the Seahawks made the trade under GM/coach Mike Holmgren, who had been in Green Bay when Hasselbeck was drafted in 1998. Hasselbeck was a sixth-round pick who developed into a preseason star in Green Bay, but he was never going to get a chance to start with Favre in place. So he moved on to Seattle. It took a while for Hasselbeck to beat out Trent Dilfer for the starting job in Seattle, but Hasselbeck eventually developed into a three-time Pro Bowler who led the Seahawks to several playoff berths and one Super Bowl. The fact that Seattle lost just one draft pick (a third-rounder) while giving up a few spots in the first round was a solid investment. Both teams came out of this deal as winners.

2000 – Packers trade Aaron Brooks and TE Lamont Hall to Saints for 2001 third-round pick and LB K.D. Williams – Brooks was the Packers’ third-string quarterback as a fourth-round pick out of Virginia, but after a year Ron Wolf was able to deal him to New Orleans for a third-rounder. The move was worthwhile for the Saints, as Brooks became a starter his first year and ended up starting 82 games for the team. Meanwhile, the Pack once again took advantage of Favre’s durability and turned a backup quarterback into a better pick than the one it had spent on him. So this deal was another win-win.

1999 – Broncos trade Jeff Lewis to Panthers for 1999 third-round pick and 2000 fourth-round pick – The Panthers, looking for a franchise quarterback, dealt for Lewis, who was a former fourth-round draft pick who was backing up John Elway in Denver. But Lewis couldn’t beat out veteran Steve Beuerlein in Carolina. Lewis was a backup for two years, in part because of a severe knee injury, getting only nominal playing time after the Panthers were eliminated from the playoff chase in 2000. And after George Seifert cut Beuerlein following the 2000 season to clear the way for Lewis, he fell flat on his face and was released at the end of training camp. The Panthers, led by rookie Chris Weinke, fell to 1-15 in 2001. The Broncos, meanwhile, dealt Lewis at the top of his value, because they already knew that Brian Griese had surpassed Lewis on the depth chart. After Elway’s retirement in 1999, Griese surpassed Bubby Brister and became a four-year starter for Denver. Denver fared fine in this trade, but it was a disaster for the Panthers.
(The short-lived Lewis era was when I covered the Panthers. Two funny stories: First, Lewis referred to himself as No. 8, leading reporters to joke that he was the first athlete to talk about himself not in the third person but the fourth person. Secondly, when Lewis saw a group of out-of-shape reporters going to play basketball during training camp, he looked at them and said, “Don’t blow a knee,” pointing back to the basketball injury that had derailed his career. It was the only time we saw a sense of humor from Lewis.)

1995 – Packers trade Mark Brunell to Jaguars for 1995 third-round pick and 1995 fifth-round pick – Brunell, who had spent two years backing up Brett Favre in Green Bay, was Jacksonville’s choice as their franchise quarterback for their first season, despite the fact that he had thrown just 27 NFL passes. It was a great move for the Jags, who got a three-time Pro Bowler for a very reasonable price. The Packers, meanwhile, had figured out that starter Favre was not just a Pro Bowl player but also an iron man who wouldn’t miss any time. So Wolf turned Brunell, a former fifth-round pick, into third- and fifth-round picks. The deal ended up as a win-win for both sides.

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Research project: QB contemporaries of Favre

With the retirement of Brett Favre, we have the end of an era. Favre, of course, owns most of the most important quarterbacking records — TD passes, yards passing, completions, attempts, interceptions, and victories as a starter, just to name the big ones. But how does he rate against the quarterbacks of his era? We did a research project and used the information to do a football relativity comparison of quarterbacks in the Brett Favre era.

A couple of descriptions: The era we’re talking about is the current era. We define this era as beginning with the end of the Cowboys dynasty (which means with the 1996 season). Also, we’re only including quarterbacks with 20,000 passing yards. Of course, that leaves out some important current quarterbacks (listed at the bottom of this post), but we had to make a cutoff somewhere.  We’ve also excluded some quarterbacks who played a bit in this era of ’96-’08 but weren’t necessarily in this era. (Those guys are also listed at the bottom of this post.) A couple of Hall of Fame quarterbacks, Steve Young and John Elway, would have been left out of this relativity comparison but won’t be because they had significant accomplishments in this era.

We’re using a 10-point scale, with 10 being the best quarterback of the era and 1 being a quarterback who hit the yardage qualifier but won’t really be remembered.

10- Tom Brady (26k passing yards), Peyton Manning (45k passing yards), Troy Aikman (32k passing yards), Steve Young (33k passing yards), John Elway (51k passing yards). Brady and Manning are the standard bearers since 2000, while Aikman, Young, and Elway all finished their careers with several years in this era.
In the era:
Brady: 3 Super Bowl wins, 1 MVP, 1 passer rating crown, 2 TD passes crowns, 2 passing yards crowns.
Manning: 1 Super Bowl win, 3 MVPs, 3 passer rating crowns, 3 TD passes crowns, 2 passing yards crowns.
Elway: 2 Super Bowl wins.
Young: 2 passer rating crowns, 1 TD passes crown.

9- Kurt Warner (28k passing yards), Brett Favre (65k passing yards). These guys are just a notch below the first group because of consistency. Favre was dynamic in the 1990s, but for most of the 2000s he was a step behind Brady and Manning. Warner has several unbelievable years, but also has a black hole in his career.
In the era:
Favre: 1 Super Bowl win, 2 MVPs, 3 TD passes crowns, 1 passing yards crown.
Warner: 1 Super Bowl win, 2 MVPs, 2 passer rating crowns, 2 TD passes crowns, 1 passing yards crown.

 8- Donovan McNabb  (29k passing yards), Drew Brees (26k passing yards), Steve McNair (31k passing yards) This is a pretty significant drop from the level before, because the remaining Super Bowl champions weren’t long-term impact guys, and the main statistical stars didn’t win big. McNabb has been a first-tier starter for 10 years now, and Brees is the new Dan Fouts — a big-time stat compiler who hasn’t won big-time in the postseason. McNair led several top teams even though he was never a huge stat guy.
In the era:
Brees: 1 TD passes crown, 2 passing yards crowns, 1 offensive player of the year award.
McNair: 1 MVP, 1 passer rating crown.

 7- Randall Cunningham (29k passing yards), Drew Bledsoe (44k passing yards), Rich Gannon (28k passing yards), Daunte Culpepper (23k passing yards). All of these guys had years when they were among the best in the league, but they didn’t sustain that excellence that long. Still, at their best they were elite quarterbacks.
In the era:
Cunningham: 1 passer rating crown.
Culpepper: 1 TD passes crown, 1 passing yards crown.
Gannon: 1 MVP, 1 passing yards crown.

6- Mark Brunell (31k passing yards), Vinny Testaverde (46k passing yards), Kerry Collins (37k passing yards), Brad Johnson (29k passing yards). Testaverde’s career stats land him here, and in this era he played for some quality Jets teams. Collins led good teams in Carolina, New York, and Tennessee. Johnson put up big numbers in Minnesota and then won a title in Tampa Bay. Brunell was a top-8 quarterback in Jacksonville for several years.
In the era:
Brunell: 1 passing yards crown.
Johnson: 1 Super Bown win.

5- Trent Dilfer (20k passing yards), Trent Green (28k passing yards), Jeff Garcia (25k passing yards), Matt Hasselbeck (23k passing yards).  The fact that Dilfer won a Super Bowl means he can’t go lower than this. Imagine what his career standing would be if the Ravens had given him a chance to stay and he had won a second title. Green was a solid starter for several years in Kansas City; Hasselbeck was a consistent winner with good Seahawks teams; and Garcia was a good starter in San Francisco and Tampa Bay, along with a good run as a backup in Philadelphia.
In the era:
Dilfer: 1 Super Bowl win

4- Chris Chandler (28k passing yards), Jake Plummer (29k passing yards). Chandler led a Falcons Super Bowl trip and was a solid starter for several years. Plummer led both the Broncos and the Cardinals to the playoffs.

3- Steve Beuerlein (24k passing yards), Jeff George (27k passing yards), Jeff Blake (21k passing yards), Marc Bulger (21k passing yards). Beuerlein had a few huge years in Carolina but was otherwise a backup. Bulger and Blake both had brief stops as triggermen in very dangerous offenses. George put up some big numbers but wasn’t a guy you could construct a franchise around.
In the era:
Beuerlein: 1 passing yards crown.
George: 1 passing yards crown.

2- Jon Kitna (27k passing yards), Jim Harbaugh (26k passing yards), Neil O’Donnell (21k passing yards). O’Donnell and Harbaugh played into this era but had their best runs before it. Kitna never was respected as a starter, but he produced numbers in Seattle, Cincinnati, and Detroit.

1- Gus Frerotte (21k passing yards), Aaron Brooks (20k passing yards). Brooks had a few good years in New Orleans, but he flamed out incredibly quickly. Frerotte was mostly a backup.

Active quarterbacks who are not included because they have not yet thrown for 20,000 yards: Brian Griese, Jake Delhomme, Chad Pennington, Carson Palmer, Ben Roethlisberger, Eli Manning, David Carr, Philip Rivers, Tony Romo.

Quarterbacks whose careers ended in this era and who had 20,000+ passing yards, but who are not included in this poll because the most significant parts of their careers happened before this era began: Dan Marino, Warren Moon, Dave Kreig, Boomer Esiason, Jim Kelly, Jim Everett, Steve DeBerg, Bernie Kosar, Bobby Hebert.

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FR: NFL game announcers

With apologies to the great Dr. Z, who for years did a far better version of this, I thought I’d put the NFL announcers on the relativity scale. 10 is the best, 1 is the worst.

I also omitted several teams that I just didn’t hear this year, because I didn’t use Dr. Z’s 4-VCR system. Those teams included: Solomon Wilcots/Ian Eagle; Steve Tasker/Gus Johnson; John Lynch/Chris Rose; any of the NFL network teams.

10- Cris Collinsworth/Al Michaels or Tom Hammond, NBC – He is the gold standard of announcers today. Interesting in the studio or in his occasional on-game appearances. What separates him is that he’s not afraid to criticize players, which isn’t always the case with other announcers. He’ll be a worthy successor to John Madden when Madden steps down.

9-  Brian Billick/Thom Brennaman, Fox – (Billick also worked with Brian Baldinger and Dick Stockton in a 3-man booth at times.) Back when I was at PFW, Billick was the gold standard of assistant coach interviews, because he knew what he was talking about and he was interesting as he talked. Nothing has changed in 10 years. This guy is great in the booth. He explains things thoroughly but in an approachable manner. Plus, he has at least a little bit of an edge. I wish he had been in the booth with Troy Aikman for Fox’s playoff games, because he would have added an extra something that Fox hasn’t had since Collinsworth was in that booth.

8 –  John Madden, Al Michaels, NBC – I’ve been down on Madden in recent years, but I thought he took a step back up this season. He still sees things on first glance that most analysts don’t see until the replay. And his excitement at the end of the Super Bowl showed that he still loves the game. Madden still veers into being a caricature of himself at times, but when he’s on the game he’s still one of the best.

7-Troy Aikman/Joe Buck, Fox – While many on the internet are anti-Buck, I’m in the pro camp. He gets a little preachy at times, and he can be too storyline driven, but he’s very willing to be combative in the booth, and his smarmy sense of humor works for me. He has big game chops, too. Aikman would be best in a 3-man booth, because his personality still comes off kind of bland at times. But Aikman makes decent points and has credibility. The bottom line is that I’d rather a big game be on Fox than CBS, which means these guys are on a level above the Simms/Nantz crew.

6- Brian Baldinger/Dick Stockton, Fox (sometimes with Brian Billick) – Baldinger is a solid broadcaster who seems to see just a bit more than the typical announcer, and because of that he’s overcome an obscure profile as a player to move up to Fox’s No. 3 team. This team knows how to handle a good game, even though Stockton isn’t as precise as I would prefer. When Billick joined this team, it took things to a whole other level. Were Fox to take my advice, they’d put Baldinger and Billick with Kenny Albert on its No. 2 team and move the Moose and Goose combination down to No. 3.

5- Phil Simms/Jim Nantz, CBS – I don’t know why, but this team just doesn’t do it for me. Simms seems to be kind of a master of the obvious at times, and Nantz tries to figure things out, out loud and then comes off like he thinks he’s a genius when he does. They had great games to broadcast this year, but this team just didn’t convey the emotional feel of the big game with their words or tones. It’s time for CBS to do better with its No. 1 team.

5 (con’t) Ron Jaworski/Tony Kornheiser/Mike Tirico, ESPN – I want to like this team; I really do. But this team doesn’t reach the like level for me. Maybe it’s the over-saturation of Jaworski, who’s on PTI weekly, on ESPN radio multiple times weekly, and more. I know Jaws does as much prep as any analyst, but he comes across as condescending at times. Plus, given his amount of research, he spends a lot of time stating the obvious. I admire Jaworski’s work, but I don’t like it. Kornheiser doesn’t add much to the team. I like the idea of having someone on a team to bring humor and ask questions about what’s going on, but the niche just isn’t defined enough for Kornheiser to truly be an asset to this group. I think this trio can work, but for it to do so, Kornhesier’s role must be clearer from the outset, and Jaws must hold back a little during the week so he has his best stuff on Mondays.

5 (con’t) – Tim Ryan/Sam Rosen. I’ve always thought Rosen was one of the underrated NFL play-by-play guys, and Ryan is serviceable. This team doesn’t get the prime games, but it does a decent job with the games it has.  Teams like this are why Fox has a lot more announcing depth than CBS does.

4 – Daryl Johnston/Tony Siragusa/Kenny Albert, Fox – I really want this team to work, because I like the innovative approach of having one analyst in the booth and one on the field. But this Moose and Goose combination isn’t clicking on all cylinders. Unfortunately, Siragusa (who is on the sidelines) too often tries to simply be funny instead of bringing insights. Johnston, like his ex-teammate Aikman, tends toward the bland side at times as well. I believe a similar-shaped team with a different former lineman (such as Mark Schlereth or Mike Golic) on the field and someone like Billick in the booth would work. But the concept just isn’t working that well as it stands here. Fox does get credit for putting Albert here on its No. 2 team instead of Stockton.

4 (con’t) -Randy Cross/Dan Fouts/Dick Enberg, CBS – This was a weird team to listen to. I don’t think Cross brings much beyond ordinary to a game, and Fouts is occasionally OK but rarely better than that. The problem was that they sound a lot alike, and so it was hard to distinguish who was talking when. It was just a strange combo that didn’t meld.  A nice try by CBS to do something different (which I’m all for), but ultimately it didn’t really work.

4 (con’t) – Tony Boselli/Ron Pitts, Fox – This is another decent but not great Fox team that doesn’t add a ton but doesn’t take anything away from a game either. Pitts is a former player who was better as an analyst than he is on play-by-play. That’s the only reason this team falls below the Ryan/Rosen duo.

4 (con’t) – Steve Beuerlein/Bill Macatee, CBS – I wanted to give a shoutout to Beuerlein, whom I covered when he was with the Panthers. For falling where he does on CBS’s food chain, Beuerlein does a nice job. In fact, I would propose that he and Rich Gannon should probably switch spots in the CBS hierarchy. Beuerlein also does college games for CBS well.

3 – J.C. Pearson/Matt Vasgersian, Fox – I like Vasgersian, but Pearson isn’t quite at the level as Tim Ryan or some of the other Fox announcers.  I do like the fact that Fox has given some guys who didn’t have major NFL profiles a chance, but Pearson is the one person on the roster who could pretty easily be replaced. Still, he’s better than some of the options CBS has given a mic to.

2- Rich Gannon/Kevin Harlan, CBS – This ranking pains me because I’m a Kevin Harlan fan (I wish he or Gus Johnson did the Final 4 instead of Jim Nantz), but Rich Gannon just doesn’t add a lot to a broadcast to me. He makes simple, obvious points but not much more. Gannon was thought of as a potential broadcasting star when he entered the game a couple of years back, but it seems that star has dimmed, and he’s destined to be little more than a mid-level game announcer. That’s frankly about right given his performance.

1- Dan Dierdorf/Greg Gumbel, CBS – Dierdorf is still a broadcasting star, but it’s been many years since he was on Monday Night Football, and he’s lost his fastball. He loves making grand pronouncements about the simplest things, and all that pontificating gets old fast. It’s hard to make it through a 3-hour game listening to Dierdorf anymore. If he wants to stay in the game, he needs to move down the ladder instead of taking up space as CBS’ No. 2 color guy.

To conclude, a few overarching thoughts: CBS needs to do better with its roster of announcers. It’s No.1  team just isn’t special, and its No. 2 and 3 teams have guys (Dierdorf, Cross) who to be honest have passed their prime. Plus, the No. 4 team depends on Gannon, who hasn’t delivered on his potential. Fox’s No. 2 team is lacking, but its top team is basically working, and it found a superstar in Billick this year. Also, Fox’s 3-4-5 teams all bring something to the table, and if John Lynch delivers next year, they will have tremendous depth. Sunday Night Football is getting it right, while Monday Night Football needs some work. And the NFL network should be thanking its lucky stars that Collinsworth likes working so much, because he adds instant credibility to those broadcasts.

Let me know what you think by leaving  a comment. And do you want to see a studio analyst relativity piece? That’ll have to come by popular demand…

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