Tag Archives: roydell williams

Pre-camp cuts

Marion the Barbarian

Marion Barber was among the Cowboys cuts. Image via Wikipedia

As we approach the beginning of the new NFL league year (finally), teams are clearing overpaid and/or unwanted players from their rosters. In this post, we discuss the major players released on the eve of training camp. This post is updated through Saturday, July 30. We’ll begin a new post with camp cuts next week.

Dallas (cut WR Roy Williams, OG Leonard Davis, RB Marion Barber, OT Marc Colombo and PK Kris Brown) – The Cowboys faced the worst salary-cap situation of any NFL team entering the offseason, and in an effort to clear not just the $16.6 million they were over but also enough room to re-sign Doug Free, they cleared the decks. Williams, whom the Cowboys paid a first-round pick to trade for a couple of years ago, never lived up to expectations. The emergence of Miles Austin and Dez Bryant left Williams behind, and saving $5 million by cutting Williams became the only way to go. Davis, a massive left guard, was slated to make $6 million, so his release is far more about price tag than performance. He’s still playing well enough to be a productive starter somewhere. Barber, who was slated to make $4.75 million, had fallen behind Felix Jones and Tashard Choice. Barber may have taken enough as a pounding that his best days are behind him. Colombo had been starting at right tackle, but injuries have kept him from being the player he was earlier in his career. The Cowboys can find an equivalent replacement at a much lower cost. Brown, who came in when David Buehler was struggling last year, was cut because his veteran salary was a luxury the Cowboys couldn’t afford given their cap situation.

Baltimore (cut WR Derrick Mason, TE Todd Heap, RB Willis McGahee, and NT Kelly Gregg) – We discussed the Ravens’ moves in this post.

N.Y. Giants (cut C Shaun O’Hara, OG Rich Seubert, OT Shawn Andrews and DT Rocky Bernard) – The Giants have had one of the most stable offensive lines in the league over the past five years, but that all ended when they cut stalwarts O’Hara and Seubert to save $5-plus million. The Giants, who were a little more than $6 million over the cap, then saved $7.5 million by axing Andrews. Andrews, whom the team brought in last year, never really returned to his top form from Philadelphia, so that move makes sense. The O’Hara and Seubert cuts are more puzzling. O’Hara was a Pro Bowl player in 2009 and 2010 before missing 10 games last season. Seubert played guard and filled in at center over the years. The puzzling thing about the move is that the Giants don’t really appear to have a succession plan inside to fortify what has been a strength for years. Bernard didn’t provide the inside push the Giants were hoping, and so when they couldn’t re-do his deal, they let him go.

Tennessee (cut QB Vince Young and DT Tony Brown) – It was no surprise that the Titans cut the cord on Young, who has great talent and decent results, but a personality that the franchise tired of. With Matt Hasselbeck and Jake Locker in place, Tennessee has started a new era at quarterback. Young will likely have to rebuild his career as a backup elsewhere. Brown, who failed a physical, has been a starter at defensive tackle for the last four years. If he can get healthy, he can still help a team as a rotation player.

Kansas City (cut OG Brian Waters, WR Chris Chambers and TE Brad Cottam) – Waters has been a stalwart of the Chiefs’ line for more than a decade, and has played at a Pro Bowl level. But his play started to slip last year, and the Chiefs made the dispassionate decision to move on. Waters could become a fill-in elsewhere if injuries strike, and one day he’ll be in the Chiefs franchise Hall of Fame for his on-field contributions and his off-field impact, which was huge as well. Chambers was a revelation when the Chiefs acquired him in the middle of the 2009 season, but that was an outlier in his recent play. That meant the contract he got last offseason was way out of line. Cottam, a former third-round pick, got passed in line by Tony Moeaki, and that made him expendable.

Green Bay (cut LBs Nick Barnett, Brady Poppinga and Brandon Chillar, DT Justin Harrell and OT Mark Tauscher) – Barnett, who had missed two of the last three years with injury, had fallen behind some of the Packers’ youngsters at linebacker. The former first-round pick wasn’t going to provide $6 million worth of production this year, and so he was a luxury for a team that’s nearly $10 million over the salary cap. He may land with another team, but he won’t make anything near what he did last year. Like Barnett, Poppinga is a former starter who missed a lot of last season due to injuries. Chillar is plagued by a hamstring injury. The Packers have found a ton of young linebackers lately, and they’ll be cheaper than Barnett, Poppinga and Chillar. Harrell, a former first-round draft pick, has struggled with injuries that have kept him from becoming a contributor. The Pack has depth up front, which makes paying Harrell for a limited role unwise. Tauscher, the team’s long-time right tackle, re-signed at midseason last year and played OK. But his high price tag, plus the Pack’s investment in first-round tackles Bryan Bulaga and Derek Sherrod made it impossible for the Pack, up against the cap, to pay Tauscher.

San Francisco (cut CB Nate Clements, QB David Carr , OT Eric Heitmann, and PK Joe Nedney) – Clements was once the highest paid cornerback in football, but he never came close to playing up to that paycheck in San Francisco. He’s probably only a borderline starter at this point. Carr, who was slated to make $2.375 million this year, was a bust as a backup last year. Nedney has been a solid kicker for the 49ers after bouncing around earlier in his career, but the 49ers brought in ex-Eagle David Akers to replace him because Nedney has a knee injury. Heitmann has a neck injury and is no longer able to contribute. That’s a loss to the 49ers, who loved taking advantage of Heitmann’s versatility.

Atlanta (cut DE Jamaal Anderson and WR Michael Jenkins) – Anderson and Jenkins, both former first-round picks, found roles in Atlanta but never lived up to their draft position. Jenkins is a tall receiver with questionable hands. Anderson never provided much of a pass rush, but he’s pretty good against the run. He is still a starting-caliber player – just not at the price the Falcons were paying.

Cleveland (cut QB Jake Delhomme) – Delhomme is a prince of a guy, but his play the last two years hasn’t been up to NFL starting caliber. The Browns signed Delhomme as a placeholder for Colt McCoy, but between injuries and terrible play, McCoy was a better option right from the start. Delhomme will need to fall into a backup role somewhere, but he’s got the team-first personality that will allow him to succeed as one.

Pittsburgh (cut OTs Max Starks and Flozell Adams and WR Antwaan Randle El) – Starks got huge money last offseason to be the Steelers’ left tackle of the future, even though he’s more of a swing tackle. But the cost was too high after Starks got hurt last season and as the Steelers paid to keep Willie Colon in free agency. Starks will find a home elsewhere if he can prove he’s healthy. Adams, who was signed after injuries to Starks and Colon last year, wouldn’t take a pay cut for a  lesser role. He’s just an average tackle at this point, but his size and experience help. The Steelers brought Randle El back last year, but the emergence of youngsters Mike Wallace and Emmanuel Sanders made him superfluous.

New England (cut OLB Tully Banta-Cain, NT Marcus Stroud, DE Ty Warren, TE Alge Crumpler, and OG Nick Kaczur) -Banta-Cain had a 10-sack season in 2009, but he fell back to 5 sacks last season. At age 31 entering the season, he’s probably more of a role player than featured guy at this point. The Patriots should be able to upgrade at pass rusher over what Banta-Cain gave them last year. He also recently had abdominal surgery, which will knock him out of training camp and could affect his ability to play as the season opens. Stroud, who was brought in last year to provide some heft in the middle, got run out of town after the Patriots landed Albert Haynesworth. At this point, the former Pro Bowler should be a two-down player at most. Warren suffered a major injury last year, and so despite his solid play earlier in his career, the Pats cut him so they can try to bring him back at a lower salary. Crumpler is a fine blocking tight end, but he’s not the receiver he once was. He’s a bit player at this point. Kaczur is a versatile backup offensive lineman but not much else.

Washington (cut C Casey Rabach, DE Philip Daniels, DT Ma’ake Kemeoatu, Ps Josh Bidwell and Sam Paulescu, OG Mike Williams, WR Roydell Williams, RBs Chad Simpson and Andre Brown) – Rabach has been the Redskins’ starting center for six years, but after its offseason spending spree, Washington decided to move on. Daniels has been a productive defensive end, but with Barry Cofield headed into town, he wouldn’t have been a starter. Kemeoatu couldn’t live up to his contract because of injuries. Mike Williams, a former top-5 pick in Buffalo, served as an average guard at times, but weight problems have kept him from living up to his potential. Roydell Williams, Simpson, Brown, and Paulescu were just bit players. Bidwell spent one year with the Redskins, but his performance wasn’t all that great. The Redskins are going to try to go cheaper at the position.

Cincinnati (cut OLB Antwan Odom) – The Bengals signed Odom to a big contract in 2009, and for six games he was perhaps the best pass rusher in the league. But then he blew out his knee, and his play in 2010 wasn’t anywhere close to his previous level. So the Bengals move on. Odom could end up as a low-cost roll of the dice for another 3-4 team.

Miami (cut LB Channing Crowder) – Crowder has made more headlines for being mouthy than for his play on the field in the NFL, but he has been an effective run-down player. Still, he’s not nearly as good as Kevin Burnett, who the Dolphins signed to replace him, and he was too pricy to be a backup.

Houston (cut DT Amobi Okoye, WR David Anderson, and QB Dan Orlovsky) – Okoye, a former first-round pick, never lived up to his potential in Houston. When the team moved to a 3-4 defense, he didn’t have a natural position, and so he was released. He’s still just 24, so another team may want to take a shot at him. Anderson had some nice moments but was never going to be more than a No. 4 receiver in Houston. Orlovsky was replaced by Matt Leinart and released; he landed immediately in Indianapolis.

Jacksonville (cut DE Derrick Harvey) – Harvey, a former top 10 pick, was a complete bust, and the Jaguars finally gave up on him. He has to hope that someone views him as a reclamation project so he can get a minor salary to play somewhere else.

Carolina (cut PK John Kasay, DEs Tyler Brayton and Hilee Taylor, and DT Ed Johnson) – Kasay, who joined the Panthers as a free agent in their inaugural season in 1995, has been not only a productive and reliable kicker but a fan and owner favorite. He in many ways has been the conscience of the team throughout his 16 years there, and he will likely be inducted into the team’s Ring of Honor. And even though he’s in his 40s, he’s maintained solid percentages and continued to hit plenty of 50-yard-plus field goals. But he can no longer kick off, and so the Panthers moved on by signing Olindo Mare. Kasay is good enough to hook on elsewhere, and he would be a terrific fill-in if a contender’s kicker gets hurt at some point this season. Brayton was a solid citizen and a decent but not great end against the run. But his pricetag is high, and given the Panthers’ spending spree it was out of line compared to production. Taylor was a draft pick project who never panned out. Johnson got a second chance in Carolina after off-field issues cost him his career with the Colts, but his play on the field wasn’t good enough to keep him around.

Seattle (cut LB Lofa Tatupu) – After failing to agree on a renegotiated contract, the Seahawks, cut Tatupu, a former Pro Bowler whose first three seasons were terrific but whose last three have been just so-so. Tatupu is a 4-3 middle linebacker, so his options on the market could be limited. The Seahawks, meanwhile, can turn to David Hawthorne, who played well in the middle when Tatupu was out in 2009.

Indianapolis (cut CB Kelvin Hayden) – Hayden, a former second-round pick, rose to prominence with an interception return for a touchdown against the Bears, and he emerged as a quality starter in 2007. But injuries have cost him time the last three seasons, and the Colts’ young corners have stepped up to the point that Hayden became expendable.

Arizona (cut QB Derek Anderson and LB Gerald Hayes) – Anderson was a bust as a starter last year, and with Kevin Kolb likely headed to town, he’s no longer needed. John Skelton or Max Hall will need to emerge as Kolb’s backup, which is feasible. Hayes was slated to make $4.25 million, but he can’t provide the bang for that many bucks.

St. Louis (OG Jacob Bell) – The Rams added Bell from the Titans last offseason, but his play didn’t hold muster. So after the team inked Harvey Dahl, they let Bell go, after Bell refused to cut his salary from the $6 million he was slated to make in 2011. Bell is still good enough to be a marginal starter, and he wasn’t going to get that chance in St. Louis any longer. UPDATE: After reports of the cut, Bell was still in St. Louis. He agreed to a pay cut and kept a roster spot.

New Orleans (cut CB Randall Gay) – The Saints have added a ton of depth at cornerback in the draft the last three years, and so Gay became expendable. Gay was OK, but he didn’t play up to his contract, and New Orleans needed to make room for youngsters.

Philadelphia (cut FB Leonard Weaver) – Weaver had a fine 2009 season in Philadelphia after joining the Eagles as a free agent, but a major knee injury last year put his career in question. He failed his physical and was released.

Detroit (cut WR Bryant Johnson and LB Jordon Dizon) – Johnson, who was slated to make $3.2 million this year, has fallen down the depth chart in Detroit with the addition of Nate Burleson last year and the drafting of Titus Young this year. Johnson had just 18 catches last year, and despite his impressive size, he’s never been a top-flight receiver. Dizon, a former second-round pick, never lived up to his promise, in part because of injuries. He didn’t play at all last season.

Denver (cut RB Correll Buckhalter and S Renaldo Hill) -Buckhalter’s first year in Denver was a strong one, but he tore his ACL last year, which makes his return to prominence at age 31 unlikely. Hill was one of the imports who was supposed to revitalize the defense under Josh McDaniels, but his performance in Denver didn’t live up to his contract. Still, he could be an effective veteran fill in for some team.

Minnesota (cut S Madieu Williams and DT Jimmy Kennedy) – Williams got a big contract a couple of years ago, but he was a below-average safety with an above-average price tag. The Vikings picked Kennedy, a former first-rounder in St. Louis, off the scrap heap three years ago, and they got a good season out of him in 2009. But he fell off last year, which meant he wasn’t worth his seven-figure cap price in 2011.

Chicago (cut TE Brandon Manumaleuna) – The Bears inked Manumaleuna to a big contract last offseason to be their blocking tight end, but his play was disappointing from the start.

N.Y. Jets (cut QBs Mark Brunell and Kevin O’Connell) – After drafting Greg McElroy, the Jets cleared the decks with their backup quarterbacks.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency

FR: April pre-draft signings

In this post, we’re comparing signings between the beginning of April and the NFL draft. For previous signings in free agency, go to the March signings post and work your way back. We’re using a comparison in which 10 marks the team with the most noteworthy moves and 1 indicates the team with barely noteworthy moves.

10 – Jets (added UFA OLB Jason Taylor) – Taylor is a specialty player at this point as a 3-4 outside pass rusher, but he had seven sacks in that role last year and should be able to shine in Rex Ryan’s attacking scheme. He got a two-year deal nominally worth $13 million, but in reality it’s a one-year deal worth up to $3.75 million with a bunch of funny money in the second year. Taylor will help the Jets continue to gear up for a major run at a championship this year. And his Dancing with the Stars-inspired acting career won’t suffer from a year in the Big Apple, either.

9 – none

8 – Saints (added DE Alex Brown and UFA DT Jimmy Wilkerson) – Brown was cut in Chicago after Julius Peppers landed there, and now he makes his way to New Orleans. There, he’ll take the spot of former first-round disappointment Charles Grant. Brown is a pretty good (but not great) defensive end who can rush the passer and stop the run, and he’s better than any other defensive end on the market in April – by a lot. For the Saints to get him was a coup that came at a reasonable two-year, $5.5 million price. That’s fair but not excessive starter money. Wilkerson got a one-year, $2 million deal even though he’s recovering from an ACL injury. If he gets healthy, he’ll be a fine second or third tackle who can help stabilize the interior of the Saints’ defense.

7 – Vikings (added CB Lito Sheppard) – Sheppard has bounced around the last couple of years, after being dissatisfied in Philly and falling out of favor with the Jets. But he’s still a pretty good player who will help a Vikings secondary that’s probably the weak link on an otherwise stacked team. Sheppard can’t play man-on-man coverage all day long, but he can be a dependable cog in a strong defense, and that’s exactly what the Vikings have. So getting Sheppard for $2 million over one year is a coup for the Vikes.

6 – Patriots (added WR Torry Holt, DT Damione Lewis and P David King) – Holt had an OK but not spectacular season in Jacksonville last year, and he’s definitely falling off from his Greatest Show on Turf days. Holt will get up to $1.7 million this year, which is a fair price for a veteran receiver, but you have to wonder if the Holt signing will repeat the failed Joey Galloway experiment of last year. Lewis had plenty of good moments as a rotation tackle for the Panthers, showing that he can get into the backfield on occasion. But the Panthers, in a youth movement, let Lewis walk. Now he goes to New England, where the Pats need a backup who can bring the pass-rush skills that Jarvis Green used to bring. Lewis is a decent bet to fill that role well, and that makes him worth a low-cost shot for the Pats. King is another of the Australian Rules Football players trying to make the move into the NFL punting fraternity.

5 – Giants (added S Deon Grant, kept UFA P Jeff Feagles) – Grant has started every game for the last nine seasons for Seattle, Jacksonville, and Carolina, and his presence at free safety will help protect the Giants against Kenny Phillips’ major 2009 injury. With Grant and Antrel Rolle, the Giants now have a solid safety duo in a spot that was troublesome last year. Feagles returns for a 23rd season, and he remains one of the best directional kickers in the league. Feagles isn’t the boomer he once was, but he gets the job done.

5 (con’t) – Bengals (kept UFA OG Bobbie Williams) – Williams was perhaps the best guard on the market, but the Bengals were able to get a deal to keep him around. He’s been a starter for the last three years, and his physical blocking is one of the reasons the Bengals have strengthened their run game the last two years.

4 – Redskins (added UFA RB Willie Parker, UFA DT Howard Green, WR Roydell Williams, and RB Ryan Torain) – Parker becomes the latest import into the Redskins’ aged backfield, as the Redskins are paying him up to $3.1 million on a one-year deal. This is an uncapped-year special by Washington, which is giving Parker a chance to vie for carries against fellow vets Clinton Portis and Larry Johnson. Parker doesn’t have the speed he did in his Fast Willie days, but he probably still has more pop than Portis or Johnson does at this point. Perhaps a five- to eight-carry role will allow Parker to showcase what speed he has left. But our suspicion is that the Redskins just wasted a couple million dollars on a bet that won’t come in. Green is a sturdy 3-4 nose tackle who should probably be a backup but who can fit the role as the Redskins move to that defensive system. Williams once was a prospect for the Titans, but he hasn’t played an NFL game since 2007. Torain was a Shanahan favorite two seasons ago in Denver before injuries shortened his rookie campaign. It’s hard to see him getting a shot behind Parker, Portis, and Johnson, but Torain probably landed with the coach most likely to give him a fair shot.

4 (con’t) – Rams (added LB Na’il Diggs) – Diggs, part of the Panthers’ purge of experienced players this year, lands in St. Louis, where his former LB coach Ken Flajole is the defensive coordinator. Diggs can take over the veteran role Will Witherspoon had in St. Louis before being traded last year. Diggs is consistent, but he doesn’t make many plays from the outside linebacker spot.

4 (con’t) – Seahawks (added OG Ben Hamilton and WRs Mike Williams and Reggie Williams) – The Seahawks’ receiving corps is pretty sorry, and so Pete Carroll is taking a shot on a couple of reclamation projects. Mike Williams, who played for Carroll at USC, hasn’t panned out anywhere as a top-10 draft pick. Reggie Williams showed some flashes of ability in Jacksonville, most recently in 2008, but he sat out last year after repeated legal problems. Reggie is more likely than Mike to make the 2010 roster, but both of these guys look like longshots at this point. Hamilton started eight games for the Broncos last year, but as a holdover from Alex Gibbs’ days as the line guru in Denver, he no longer fit the Broncos. But Gibbs is now in Seattle, and Hamilton’s knowledge of and fit in the system makes him a natural to replace the traded Rob Sims at left guard, at least in the short term.

3 – Lions (kept DE Jared DeVries) – DeVries, who Detroit had released in the offseason, returns to the only team he has played for on a one-year, $1.7 million deal. He’s probably better off as a backup at this point in his career, but DeVries is a veteran who can still be an asset.

3 (con’t) – Jaguars (kept UFA DE Reggie Hayward) – Hayward returns for his sixth season in Jacksonville after coming off an injury that limited him to a single game in ’09. He’s little more than a rotation pass-rusher at this point, but he could provide depth behind youngsters Quentin Groves and Derrick Harvey and offseason acquisition Aaron Kampman.

2 – Cardinals (added UFA PK Jay Feely) – Feely, whom the Jets didn’t make a big push to retain, moves to Arizona, where he’ll replace Neil Rackers. Feely has been a reliable kicker in past years, and moving out of the Meadowlands into the Arizona dome at age 34 could help prolong his effectiveness.

2 (con’t) – Texans (added UFA Neil Rackers) – Rackers lost his gig to Feely in Arizona, and so he moves to Houston to compete with Kris Brown. Neither Rackers nor Brown was at his best last year, and the Texans’ prolific offense needs a consistent kicker to produce maximum points. If Rackers makes good and wins the job from Brown, he’ll earn $4.1 million over two years. But with only $350,000 guaranteed, Rackers will have to go out and take the job from Brown.

2 (con’t) – 49ers (added UFA OLB Travis LaBoy) – LaBoy missed the entire 2009 season with torn tendons in his foot, but before that injury he had 23.5 sacks in five years with the Cardinals and Titans. At age 28, he’s worth a one-year, $1.6 million risk to see if he can recapture his pass-rush skills.

2 (con’t) – Bears (kept UFA LB Pisa Tinoisamoa) – The linebacker we affectionately call The Tower missed most of his first Chicago season with injury, but he knows Lovie Smith’s defense well from St. Louis days and can be an effective fill-in starter.

2 (con’t) – Steelers (kept UFA DE Nick Eason) – Eason started five games last year, but he’s best as a fourth defensive end who can hold up in the 3-4 defense. He’s also one of the all-time good guys and the subject of one of the most telling stories I picked up covering Clemson football back in 2001. Just for personal reasons, I’m glad to see Eason stay in the league as long as possible.

1 – Browns (added C Eric Ghiaciuc) – Ghiaciuc started at center for the Bengals for several years, but he bounced around last year. Now he lands in Cleveland as Alex Mack’s backup.

1 (con’t) – Titans (added QB Chris Simms) – The Titans brought back Simms, who spent last year with Denver, to serve as the No. 3 quarterback behind Vince Young and Kerry Collins.

1 (con’t) – Raiders (added QB Kyle Boller) – Boller, who started a few games as the Rams’ backup last year, moves to Oakland to serve as the No. 3 quarterback behind JaMarcus Russell and Bruce Gradkowski. Gradkowski’s offseason pectoral muscle injury makes having Boller, a veteran who knows new offensive coordinator Hue Jackson, a nice insurance policy.

1 (con’t) – Panthers (added PK Todd Carter and S Aaron Francisco; claimed DB Brian Witherspoon on waivers) – Carter, a small-school kicker, comes in to serve as the kickoff guy in Carolina. The Panthers had Rhys Lloyd in that role last year, but finding a first-year player to fill that role saves them $800,000. And right now, every penny seems to count in Carolina. Francisco is a special-teams ace who has played on the last two Super Bowl losers. He won’t make much of a defensive impact, but he could help replace the departed Dante Wesley. Witherspoon brings some kick return skills.

1 Comment

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency

Training Camp Moves – Week 2

This post is a compilation of additions NFL teams made during the second full week of camps. The timetable for this post opens on August 1 and continues through August 6. You can read a summary of the first week of training camp moves here, and follow past offseason moves from there. Because moves will be coming fast and furious throughout training camp, we’re going to use quick analysis of moves each week during this time instead of creating a massive Football Relativity comparison.

Additions

Seahawks (add CB Travis Fisher and OGs Cory Withrow and Grey Ruegamer) – After cutting ’08 starter Mike Wahle, the Seahawks went looking for interior offensive line depth. Withrow and Ruegamer are both veteran hands, and it apepars that they’ll be fighting it out for one job (at best). Fisher provides depth at an already-deep position, but with Marcus Trufant battling a back injury, Seattle went for some insurance.

Eagles (add LBs Matt Wilhelm and Jason Babin) – When starting MLB Stewart Bradley went out, the Eagles faced a huge gap in the middle. They were fortunate that Wilhelm, a starter in San Diego, was on the market. Wilhelm isn’t an impact guy, but he’s big and can at least help stuff the run. He’ll be moving from a 3-4 defense to a 4-3, which could cause some problems, but it’s worth a shot for Philly to see if Wilhelm can adjust and contribute as a two-down player. There probably wasn’t anybody else on the market as good as Wilhelm, so props to Philly for getting this deal done immediately after Bradley’s injury. Babin, a former first-round pick in Houston, has potential as a pass rusher but has never really realized it. Still, he’s worth a look – especially in Philly’s attacking D.

Falcons (add LB Jamie Winborn and WRs Robert Ferguson and Marty Booker) – After losing Keith Brooking to free agency in the offseason, the Falcons wanted a veteran hand in their LB corps. That’s what Winborn brings, along with Mike Peterson. Winborn probably fits in best as Curtis Lofton’s backup at middle linebacker, but he could step into the strong-side role if Peterson were to get hurt. This is a move designed to bring depth, and it should do just that. Ferguson never really broke out as a receiver in Green Bay or Minnesota, but he’s a veteran who can slip into the No. 3 or No. 4 spot in the ATL now that Harry Douglas is out for the year. With Douglas out and Roddy White holding out, the Falcons desperately needed depth, and Ferguson can provide that. The fact that Ferguson can help on special teams as well should help secure him a spot on the regular-season roster. Booker has had a more accomplished career than Ferguson, but his size and lack of speed makes him a lot like current Falcons wideout Brian Finneran. So unless Booker shows a burst he hasn’t featured in recent years, he’s a long shot to make it.

Chiefs (add WR Amani Toomer and QB Matt Gutierrez) – Toomer, the long-time Giant, no longer has any kind of breakaway speed, but he catches the ball when it’s thrown to him. It seems a little strange to have both Toomer and Bobby Engram on the same roster, which could lead to a release down the line. But if Mark Bradley doesn’t continue to emerge, then Toomer is a solid insurance policy. Probably the best-case scenario for the Chiefs is to have Toomer as their No. 4 receiver who can fill in outside if Bradley or Dwayne Bowe has to miss time. Relying on Toomer for more than that could prove to be a mistake. Gutierrez is good enough to be on a roster, but it didn’t make much sense for the Patriots to have two inexperienced backups behind Tom Brady. That appears to be why Gutierrez lost his spot there to Andrew Walter. The Chiefs claimed Gutierrez on waivers to be their third quarterback, which makes sense because he’s coming from the same system as starter Matt Cassel. Gutierrez still has potential, and the fact that new Chiefs GM Scott Pioli knows him reveals the logic behind the move. He’ll upgrade the Chiefs at the No. 3 QB spot and could even make trading promising backup Tyler Thigpen an option at some point before 2010.

Patriots (add DE Derrick Burgess and QB Andrew Walter) – Burgess, who had 38.5 sacks in his four years in Oakland but only 3.5 last year, had become disgruntled as a Raider, and so he’s been seeking a trade all offseason and into training camp. He finally landed in New England (as had long been rumored) in exchange for 3rd- and 5th-round draft picks in 2011 (according to Mike Lombardi). Burgess fits in New England as a situational pass rusher but not much more. Still, given the veteran nature of the Pats’ roster, and given the luck New England has had with Raiders castoffs like Randy Moss, we can count on Burgess finding a nice niche and filling his role well. Walter is a former third-round pick, but his potential never revealed itself during his starts in Oakland. Still, he has a good arm, and his experience provides a better balance to backup Kevin O’Connell than Matt Gutierrez’ raw ability did.

Texans (add CB Deltha O’Neal and RB Andre Hall) – With Dunta Robinson holding out and Jacque Reeves out for more than a month, the Texans were in dire need of cornerback help. O’Neal is a veteran who can attack the ball but also gets burned at times. Still, he can help enough to be worth a look in Houston’s hour of need. Hall has shown flashes of ability in the past, and he has played in a system like Houston’s in Denver, so he could get noticed in the preseason.

Cardinals (add C Melvin Fowler) – Fowler, a center who was most recently with the Bills, is an experienced hand who should provide some stability as a backup. He won’t beat out Lyle Sendelein, but he is a better insurance policy than Donovan Raiola would have been.

Bengals (keep CB Jamar Fletcher) – Fletcher, who played 11 games for Cincinnati last year, was on the outside looking in until David Jones’ injury opened a roster spot for him. The former first-round pick and 8-year veteran faces an uphill battle to make the roster, but at least he’s in a camp now.

Redskins (add WR D.J. Hackett) – Hackett, who showed potential in Seattle but busted out as a big free-agent addition in Carolina last year, hooked on with the Redskins after offseason import Roydell Williams was released because he broke a pinkie finger and would miss the next month. Hackett is big and has shown the ability to get downfield regularly, but his lack of consistency hampers him from being a regular rotation player. Hackett is the kind of veteran who can make a roster and help in case of injury – or in case of slow development of young receivers that are plentiful in Washington. But even if Hackett makes the team, he’ll probably be a game-day inactive until an injury or demotion opens the door for him.

Jets (add WR Aundrae Allison and TE Kevin Brock) – Allison, a former fifth-round pick, had just 18 catches in two seasons, and he was passed by youngsters Sidney Rice and Percy Harvin. So the Vikings cut Allison, and then the Jets quickly grabbed him off waivers. He has average size but above-average speed, and that’s the reason he’s work a look. Allison could also figure in as a return specialist at a cheap price. Brock, an undrafted rookie who spent OTAs in Carolina, is a pass-catching tight end from Rutgers. He does what Dustin Keller can do, which should at least make it easier for the Jets to run their regular offensive sets with Mark Sanchez and the No. 2s. He’s a useful camp body, which shows the Jets are actually thinking as they try to prep Sanchez for the season.

Subtractions

Seahawks (cut OG Mike Wahle) – Wahle, a big-time free-agent signing last year who started all season, failed his physical before camp, and he was released. The 12-year veteran is reportedly considering retirement. The main upshot of Wahle’s release could be that second-round pick Max Unger has an easier path to a starting spot as a rookie.

Redskins (cut WR Roydell Williams) – Williams, who looked to be a fifth receiver, was waived/injured after suffering a broken pinkie that will sideline him until just before the regular season. Once he gets healthy, he could land somewhere as a backup receiver. He’s the kind of guy who could also go to the UFL and be a standout to try to enhance his value.

4 Comments

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency

Free-agency review – post-draft through May

The free agent moves should start slowing down at this point, but there are still enough of them that it’s worth comparing them. This relativity comparison includes moves starting after draft day all the way through the the month of May. If you want to see previous comparisons, check out this post and move back from there.

10 – Seahawks (keep LB Leroy Hill; add CB Ken Lucas, FB Justin Griffith and LS Bryan Pittman) – Hill was Seattle’s franchise player, but the team pulled the tag off of him after drafting Aaron Curry. But the team still wanted to keep Hill, and so they ended up hammering out a long-term deal with him. Instead of a one-year, $8 million deal, Hill gets a six-year pact worth up to $38 million with $15.5 million guaranteed. He’s a solid player who will team with Curry and Lofa Tatupu to give Seattle a terrific (if expensive) linebacker trio. Lucas was a Seahawk for six years before moving to Carolina for big free-agent dollars. He’s a big physical corner who doesn’t have great speed but doesn’t need it for his style of play. It wasn’t that long ago that Lucas was a top-5 corner in the league. In fact, the Seahawks never were able to replace Lucas’ physicality after he left following the ’04 season. He probably shouldn’t be a No. 1 corner anymore, but he’s still a solid No. 2. Griffith is the prototypical fullback for a West Coast offense. Pittman had spent five-plus years as the Texans’ long snapper before being sidelined in the StarCaps case last year. He is a professional long snapper who fills a spot that’s been a void in Seattle the last couple of years.

10 (con’t) – Dolphins (add DE Jason Taylor) – Taylor and the Dolphins had an acrimonious divorce last offseason, as Taylor went Dancing with the Stars while new team grand poobah Bill Parcells laid down the law. The Fins dealt Taylor to Washington, but knee and calf injuries limited Taylor’s effectiveness. He played in 13 games, but managed just 3.5 sacks. After the season, Taylor decided he would rather spend the offseason at home in Florida than in the ‘Skins training program, so he asked for his release (and gave up $8 million in the process). Now, he lands back with Miami on a one-year, $1.1 million deal. Taylor had a great career in Miami (117 sacks in 11 years), and he really wants to be a Dolphin again. The team hopes that he can go opposite of Joey Porter to accelerate the team’s pass rush. Motivation shouldn’t be a question for Taylor, who seems excited to be back. And in a limited role, he should still be a quality contributor. All in all, it’s a good investment for the Dolphins, who get a pass rusher and a fan favorite for a budget-conscious price. In the end, the Dolphins got a second-rounder from Washington but only lost Taylor’s services for a year.

9 – Bengals (add S Roy Williams) – Williams had some good seasons as an in-the-box safety in Dallas, even reaching Pro Bowl level. But over recent years, his performance has plummeted as his coverage inadequacies have been exposed. That, plus a hefty price tag, led the Cowboys to cut the cord. Now he heads to Cincinnati, where he’s reunited with ex-Cowboys defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer. Zimmer knows what Williams does well and what he can’t do, which gives the Bengals a little better than average chance to use Williams well. Plus, his veteran leadership could help a team that’s slowly building a new defensive nucleus around LBs Keith Rivers and Rey Maualuga. On a short-term, incentive-laden deal, it’s easy to see why Cincinnati would take this shot.

9 (con’t) – 49ers (add CB Dre Bly) – The 49ers replaced Walt Harris, who blew out his ACL in minicamp, with Bly, a fellow veteran who has been a long-term starter in Denver, Detroit, and St. Louis and has 40 career interceptions and Pro Bowl nods in ’03 and ’04.. Bly isn’t as big as Harris, and he’s more of a gambler, but he will provide the expertise and veteran play that San Fran needs across from Nate Clements. Bly is also three years younger, and so while he’s not in his prime anymore, he’s not that far past it. It will be interesting to see if Bly’s ball-hawking style fits Mike Singletary’s approach as well as Harris’ more physical play did. But given how late in free agency Harris’ injury happened, Bly is about the best option the 49ers could have come up with. They needed corner help badly, and they got it in this veteran.

8 – Lions (add LB Larry Foote, OTs Jon Jansen and Ephriam Salaam, OG Toniu Fonoti, and DEs Eric Hicks and Jason Hunter) – Foote had been cut in Pittsburgh for salary-cap reasons. Not only is Foote a Michigan native and alum, he’s an extremely solid inside ‘backer on running downs. He has limitations and probably shouldn’t be trying to drop into coverage, but he is a quality NFL starter who definitely upgrades Detroit’s lion-up. (Sorry.) It’s only a one-year deal, but if Foote provides leadership that term could be extended. Regardless, the Lions’ defense is better today because Foote is there. Jansen quickly latched on with the Lions on a one-year, minimum-salary deal. Like ILB Larry Foote, he’s a Michigan alum who comes home to try to help the first steps of Detroit’s rebuilding process. He might not start, but he provides depth at a trouble spot and should help to mentor ‘08 first-rounder Gosder Cherilus. That’s a good deal for the Lions at the vet minimum. Salaam has started 129 games in his 11 NFL seasons, but he became a backup in Houston last year. Still, given the fact that Detroit didn’t draft a tackle this year, Salaam could find a role for a single season, even with Jansen now around. Hicks and Fonoti are veterans who may not have much left but who are worth a look for a team as talent-depleted as Detroit. Hunter lost his spot in Green Bay when the Packers moved to a 3-4 defense, but he can contribute as a 4-3 end in Detroit.

7 – Browns (add CB Rod Hood and WR Mike Furrey) – Hood, who had started the last two years for the Cardinals, was shoved aside after Arizona added Bryant McFadden. Hood is a big, physical corner who is apt to give up the big play but is an asset against the run and is good enough to start. He steps into a weak spot on the depth chart in Cleveland, and he should surpass Corey Ivy, Eric Wright, or Brandon McDonald to continue as a starter there. As long as the Browns don’t count on him for much man coverage, Hood will help. Meanwhile, the Browns are in serious upheaval at wide receiver. They’ve cut the cord on Joe Jurevicius, and we now must expect Donte Stallworth to miss some time with legal matters related to a deadly car accident he was involved in last year. And that doesn’t even address the persistent Braylon Edwards trade rumors. So Cleveland has tried to reload at receiver, by signing David Patten and drafting Brian Robiskie and Mohammed Massaquoi in the second round. Now they add Mike Furrey, who bounced through the XFL and the Arena League before establishing himself as a legit NFL receiver. Furrey’s best success has come in Mike Martz systems in St. Louis and Detroit, and he doesn’t have great size, but it’s still easy to see him as an effective inside receiver. If nothing else, he’ll try hard and give some level of certainty at a very uncertain position for Cleveland.

6 – Colts (kept LB Freddie Keiaho and DT Ed Johnson) – The Colts didn’t tender Keiaho a contract as a restricted free agent even though he was a starter last season. But they’re bringing him back on a one-year deal to help in a problem area. Keiaho’s small, but he makes enough plays to warrant some snaps. Johnson is a talented defensive tackle who the Colts let go last year after a drug-possession arrest. He fits a need, and the Colts are making it clear that Johnson has a supershort leash. But if he takes advantage of another chance, he’ll help.

6 (con’t) – Saints (add DE Anthony Hargrove) – Hargrove sat out the entire ’08 season after his third violation of the league’s substance abuse policy. He has been reinstated, which makes him valuable to the Saints, who need DE depth for the first four games of the season pending the disputed suspensions of DEs Will Smith and Charles Grant. Both of those starters face four-game bans for using performance-enhancing substances, but they are appealing in court, and no final decision has come down. So Hargrove ends up being a talented insurance policy if he can stay clean.

5 – Patriots (add LB Paris Lenon S Brandon McGowan) – Lenon led the Lions in tackles last year with 121, but he figures in more as a backup in New England. He adds depth and probably fills the roster spot that injured third-round pick Tyrone McKenzie would have occupied. McGowan missed all of last season with an injury, but the former Bear is a physical safety who can step in if rookie Patrick Chung isn’t ready to go for the Pats. With Rodney Harrison likely done, the Pats are wise to add some depth at safety.

5 (con’t) – Raiders (add FB Lorenzo Neal, RB Gary Russell, TE J.P. Foschi and S Keith Davis) – Neal has long been the best blocking fullback in the league. He’s still a hammer who can help open holes for Oakland’s talented running backs. Russell is a backup type who had a short-yardage role in Pittsburgh last year. But he’s unlikely to get many carries or even make the opening-game roster with Darren McFadden, Justin Fargas, and Michael Bush ahead of him on the depth chart. Davis played seven years in Dallas and established himself as a special-teams ace, and last year he started half the year at safety. The Raiders probably need someone better to start, but Davis can be a good backup and a very good contributor on specialty units.

4 – Broncos (add LB Nick Griesen and RB Darius Walker) – Griesen was a backup in Baltimore, and so he knows the 3-4 defense and could fit in for Denver, which is implementing the defense but is still looking for players to start, much less fill roles. Walker showed some promise during his two years in Houston, but he’s not of the caliber of Denver’s top running backs Knowshon Moreno, Correll Buckhalter, or even holdover Peyton Hillis.

4 (con’t) – Bears (add LB Pisa Tinoisamoa and TE Michael Gaines) – Tinoisamoa has limitations, but he fits in as a two-down linebacker alongside Brian Urlacher and Lance Briggs in Chicago. The Tower (of Pisa) knows Bears coach Lovie Smith from the St. Louis days, so the defense will be familiar. Tinoisamoa is a clean-up tackler who doesn’t make a ton of big plays, but he won’t need to with superstars Briggs and Urlacher there. He should help to stabilize the defense and allow Briggs and Urlacher a bit more freedom to attack, both of which are advantages for the Bears. This seems to be a good fit for the Tower. Gaines is a bulky blocking tight end who doesn’t figure as a receiving threat behind Greg Olsen and Desmond Clark but could be useful as a jumbo-package role player. It’s a shame the Bears have three legit tight ends but such a paucity of wideouts.

3 – Chiefs (add C Eric Ghiacius) – Ghiacius started all 16 games at center for the Bengals last year, and he’ll compete with Rudy Niswanger for a starting job in K.C. Ghiacius is a marginal NFL starter, but it will help the Chiefs to have another veteran around for the sake of depth and competition.

3 (con’t) – Steelers (add WR Shaun McDonald, P Dirk Johnson and RB Verron Haynes) – McDonald had a big year in ’07 with Detroit, but when Mike Martz left his role in the offense diminished. McDonald is small but quick. He fits in as a third or fourth receiver in Pittsburgh, but having a veteran like him around is smart because the Steelers still don’t know how second-year WR Limas Sweed will develop. Johnson, who punted in 13 games for the Cardinals last season, is a marginal NFL punter, but he will at least provide some competition at a spot that was a problem for Pittsburgh last year. Haynes was a long-time Steeler who didn’t play last year. He could end up as a backup running back in a bit role.

2 – Ravens (add QB John Beck and WR Kelley Washington) – After the emergence of Joe Flacco last year, the Ravens don’t really have a quarterback need. They have a young starter and a young promising backup in Troy Smith. But Ravens offensive coordinator Cam Cameron drafted Beck in the second round when he was the head coach in Miami, and so he obviously sees potential in him. So the Ravens gave Beck a one-year contract that could last longer because Beck, with just two years of service time, will be controlled by the Ravens for at least one additional season. This is a low-risk move that could pay off in terms of a future trade if Cameron can restore the luster Beck once had as a prospect. Washington is a big, rangy receiver who had some success as a receiver in Cincinnati but never lived up to his potential. Then he went to New England and became a standout special-teamer, which speaks well of his character as a teammate. He’ll find a special-teams role in Baltimore and provide needed depth at receiver, but it’s unlikely that he’ll move too far up the depth chart.

2 (con’t) – Redskins (add WR Roydell Williams and OT Jeremy Bridges) – The Redskins won’t have WR depth until second-year players Devin Thomas and Malcolm Kelly develop, so they take a flier on Williams, a former Titan who didn’t play last season. If he provides competition for Thomas and Kelly, he will have done his job. Bridges started 28 games at guard and tackle in Carolina over the past three seasons, but repeated legal troubles led the Panthers to cut the cord. He needs to be on a short leash, but he is good enough to at least provide quality depth.

1 – Jaguars (add QB Todd Bouman) – Bouman, a third-stringer who was let go in Baltimore after the Ravens acquired John Beck, could move up a spot to No. 2 in Jacksonville if he can beat out Cleo Lemon. You don’t want Bouman to start, but he’s a pro who knows the offense and won’t kill you as a short-term fill-in.

1 (con’t) – Cardinals (add OT Oliver Ross and TE Dominique Byrd) – Ross is a 10-year vet who spent the last two seasons on injured reserve after a decent career in Dallas and Arizona. At this point, he’s probably a long shot to contribute, but why not take a shot if you’re the Cardinals? Byrd is a former Rams prospect who didn’t play last year but could figure into a muddle tight-end situation for the Cards.

1 (con’t) – Giants (add G Tutan Reyes and TE George Wrighster) – Reyes is a huge guard who has been around since 2000. He started three games in Jacksonville last year, but he’s probably better off as a backup who provides veteran wile and can fill in in a pinch. Wrighster is another former Jaguar who has 94 career catches but is more of a backup who will fall in line behind Kevin Boss in New York.

1 (con’t) – Jets (keep TE Bubba Franks) – Franks, a former first-round pick, was an adequate blocker with the Jets last year. He should be a solid complement to receiving threat Dustin Keller once again.

1 (con’t) – Panthers (add OG Justin Geisinger) – Geisinger was a reserve for the Redskins last year, but he could find a roster spot in Carolina. The Panthers have lost their top three OL backups this offseason, and they showed last offseason a strategy bring in low-cost vets and let them compete for jobs. Geisinger at least provides such competition. He’s also the first free-agent addition of the offseason for the cap-strapped Panthers.

1 (con’t) – Rams (add WR Tim Carter) – Carter once showed potential with the Giants, but injuries kept him from making an impact. New Rams coach Steve Spagnuolo must have seen enough to remember Carter and give him another shot. Unfortunately for Carter, it’s a long shot.

1 (con’t) – Texans (add LB Boomer Grigsby) – Grigsby is an undersized ‘backer who can play inside and on special teams.

Leave a comment

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency