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Quarterback solutions for 2011

Matt Hasselbeck of the Seattle Seahawks

Matt Hasselbeck. Image via Wikipedia

We’ll take a brief break from our playoff coverage to try and give some hope to the teams who landed outside of the final four. To do this, we’re going to break down the quarterbacks who may be available to switch teams this offseason. We’re going to break them down by categories so that you can see just how likely it is that your favorite team can land each guy.

If you have ideas of great matches between a quarterback and a team, leave them in the comments below, and we’ll talk about it.

We’ve also created a post of teams with quarterback needs to help you play a matching game.

Unrestricted Free Agents (Free to sign anywhere)
Peyton Manning, Michael Vick, Matt Hasselbeck, Kerry Collins, Alex Smith, Marc Bulger, Rex Grossman, Billy Volek, Seneca Wallace, Chad Pennington, Luke McCown, Charlie Frye, J.P. Losman, Kyle Boller, Patrick Ramsey

First of all, cross Manning and Vick off your list. The Colts and Eagles will not let these franchise quarterbacks leave via free agency, unless something incredibly screwy happens with the new CBA (whenever it is signed). While Manning and Vick are unrealistic pipe dreams, the other guys on this list are on the market. Hasselbeck’s strong postseason play for the Seahawks likely increased his price tag, and he’s likely in line for a multi-year deal now, which may price him out of Seattle given the team’s investment in Charlie Whitehurst. The Seahawks say they want to keep Hasselbeck, but will they be willing to pay him $15 million-plus as a franchise player? We can’t buy that. Therefore, our hunch is that Hasselbeck is the one 2011 starter who could step in somewhere else – especially somewhere with a West Coast type of scheme like Minnesota or Cleveland – and provide an upgrade immediately. Collins and Bulger, both of whom were backups this year, are more of stopgap options. Collins played some in Tennessee with mixed results, while Bulger got a break from the beating he took in St. Louis by sitting behind Joe Flacco in Baltimore. Neither is a long-term answer, but both could provide competition for an average quarterback or serve as a placeholding starter for a team developing a young QB. Smith is the wild card of this group. He has talent, but it never worked out in San Francisco. But some team might choose to invest and take a look to see if he can step up his play in a more stable situation. Grossman is in the perfect situation in Washington because he’s been with offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan longer than Donovan McNabb and seems to be favored over the higher profile QB. If Grossman wants another shot to start, now’s the time to leave after a solid end-of-season performance, but his best chance to succeed and maybe to start is with the Redskins. Volek showed flashes of ability in Tennessee years ago, and he could be a stopgap in Carolina, where the new coach and offensive coordinator saw him practice in San Diego. Wallace is a decent backup who can run the West Coast offense and also move around a bit, but aside from Cleveland president Mike Holmgren, few NFL types see him as more than a No. 3. Pennington was once a quality starter, but his shoulder’s in such bad shape that he’s just a No. 3 at this point. The other guys on this list are not starters but could provide some veteran assurance for a team looking for a third guy.

Limbo Free Agents (Players with four or five years of service who would be unrestricted free agents in a system like 2009 or before but not under the 2010 system)
Tarvaris Jackson (5), Bruce Gradkowski (5), Matt Leinart (5), Kellen Clemens (5), Brodie Croyle (5),  Drew Stanton (4), Tyler Thigpen (4), Matt Moore (4), Trent Edwards (4), Troy Smith (4)

These players may or may not be unrestricted free agents, and all are risky. Gradkowski has had the most success as a starter, making up for physical limitations with gutty play, and it appears he’s not a favorite of Al Davis in Raiderland. He could be a decent stopgap somewhere. Leinart never lived up to his billing in Arizona, but we could see him getting one more shot to compete somewhere. Jackson had his moments in Minnesota, but he was never consistent, and the Vikings have decided he’s not their quarterback of the future. Clemens showed some promise with the Jets before getting stuck, first behind Brett Favre and then behind Mark Sanchez. A change of scenery should provide a better opportunity than he’s had in three years. Croyle is nothing more than a backup. Thigpen had a long chance in Kansas City and a brief chance for the Dolphins this year, but his win/loss record is abysmal. Still, he may be a guy a team wants to bring in as a competitor for a starting job. Stanton had shown little promise until this year in Detroit, where injuries to Matthew Stafford and Shaun Hill forced him into action. Stanton played well enough to at least move up from a No. 3 quarterback to a backup, and perhaps even enter a competitive environment. Moore and Edwards have had shots to start in Carolina and Buffalo, respectively, but both lost their jobs. They’re likely to fill in as backups instead of a starting candidates. Smith showed some spark in San Francisco this year, but he looks to be an energetic backup who can step up in a pinch instead of an every-week starter.

Restricted Free Agents (Players with three years experience who could move teams via offer sheet)
Dennis Dixon, Brian Brohm

Dixon, the Steelers’ backup, has had a couple of starting shots and has played OK. He’s not great, but someone might be enamored with his potential. If the Steelers don’t place a high tender on Dixon, he could be targeted. Brohm was a higher draft pick than Dixon, so an offer sheet is more unlikely. His Buffalo tenure has been uneventful.

Trade (These players are under contract in 2011)
Vince Young, Donovan McNabb, Kevin Kolb, Matt Flynn, Kyle Orton – UPDATE: Carson Palmer?

These names are more speculative, but they’re likely to be targeted to some degree or another. The Titans definitely want to be rid of Young, and if they can’t trade him, they’ll release him. At some point, some team will give up a late-round pick to get an exclusive shot at rehabilitating a former top-3 pick who has a winning record as a starter. McNabb may draw some interest as well, although he’s clearly in his decline phase and isn’t worth more than a mid-round pick. But with just one year left on his contract, don’t be shocked to see McNabb shopped. Like McNabb, Orton signed a one-year extension during the season, only to see the starting job go to a younger player during the year. Since Tim Tebow is longer for Denver than Orton is, the Broncos might consider dealing Orton at the right price – likely a mid-round pick. It’s unlikely that the Packers will deal Flynn, but after his solid debut start against the Patriots late this season he’ll be a dream answer for teams looking for a young starter. If the price gets high enough, the Packers might make a move. But the cream of this crop is Kolb, who has one year remaining on his contract at a reasonable price. Certainly, the Eagles would prefer to keep Kolb to back up Vick, whose versatile style exposes him to more of an injury risk than other QBs. But if the Eagles were offered a first-round pick, they’d have to consider trading Kolb and letting young prospect Mike Kafka step in as their backup. That’s a move that Andy Reid’s mentor Mike Holmgren used time after time in Green Bay to build draft equity. Kolb has shown enough in his starting stints to be considered an average NFL starter right away with the promise to emerge into even more.

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A big Little, and other Week 15 transactions

Each week we share insights, analysis, and opinions of the week’s transactions. To see previous posts, click this link and start working back.

The highlight transaction of the week came from a player who didn’t even see the field in 2010 – Rams DE Leonard Little, who retired on Wednesday. Little spent his entire 12-year career with the Rams, piling up 87.5 sacks. While he is primarily known for a drunk-driving incident in his second season that killed a woman, Little remained a Ram throughout his career. He was on the Rams’ Super Bowl winner in 1999 and made a Pro Bowl in 2003, which was one of his double-digit sack seasons. he didn’t play in 2010 and let the Rams know in December that he was hanging up his cleats after a solid career. You can compare Little’s career to the careers of other 2010 retirees in this updated post.

In this week’s other transactions…

Giants (put WR Steve Smith and LB Clint Sintim on injured reserve) – Smith, who has been battling a left knee injury, had to finally give up the ghost and go on injured reserve. It’s a loss to the Giants, but with Hakeem Nicks and Mario Manningham returning to health, at least it comes at a position of strength. Sintim is out for the rest of the season with a torn right ACL.

Vikings (put QB Tarvaris Jackson on injured reserve, add QB Patrick Ramsey) – Jackson suffered turf toe in his first start of the season Monday againts the Giants, and that injury ends not only his season but likely his Vikings tenure. Jackson has talent but has never been consistent enough to be a reliable starter. He could be a high-end backup QB somewhere in 2011, though. Ramsey comes on board to give the Vikings an emergency QB behind the injured Brett Favre and rookie Joe Webb.

Eagles (put DE Brandon Graham on injured reserve, add DE Derrick Burgess) – Graham, the Eagles’ first-round pick out of Michigan, suffered a torn right ACL last week. To replace him, the Eagles bring back Burgess, who spent the first four years of his career as an Eagle. Burgess can still provide a bit of pass-rush pop on occasion and should be a nice fit in a limited role.

Dolphins (put OT Vernon Carey on injured reserve, add WR Kevin Curtis) – Carey, the Dolphins’ standout right tackle, is out with a knee injury. Curtis, the former Ram and Eagle, missed most of the season coming back from testicular cancer that was diagnosed late in the summer. Here’s hoping he completes his comeback with solid play down the stretch.

Texans (put DE Mario Williams on injured reserve, add DE Jarvis Green) – The Texans set down Williams, whose injury recover has been too slow to make it back this season. Green, a long-time Patriot most recently with the Broncos, fills his roster spot.

Titans (put C Eugene Amano and DT Tony Brown on injured reserve) – The bad gets worse in Tennessee, as the Titans lose two starters for the rest of the year.

Redskins (cut P Hunter Smith, add P Sam Paulescu) – Smith, a veteran punter who botched a potential game-tying extra point last Sunday against Tampa Bay, was released in favor of Paulescu. Smith had a lot of good seasons with the Colts, but as a Redskin his punting distance faded as he aged. So it makes sense for the Redskins to bring in a younger guy in Paulescu to see if he can handle the job. Paulescu has punted for four teams, most notably in a 10-game stint with the Cowboys.

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Week 7 Transactions

Dallas Clark

Image by Jeffrey Beall via Flickr

Each week we share insights, analysis, and opinions of the week’s transactions. To see previous posts, click here and start working back. 

We’ll begin with the latest Colts injury and what it means. The Colts put TE Dallas Clark on injured reserve Friday with a wrist injury, meaning that he’ll miss the rest of the season. It’s a huge blow to the Colts, because Clark is a terrific receiver who is versatile enough to be in-line, in the slot, or even split out wide. He had more than 100 catches last season, and he’s one of the best red-zone targets in the league. Clark’s injury is the latest blow for a Colts team that is also without RB Joseph Addai and WR Austin Collie when they return from their bye next week. Those injuries limit how creative Peyton Manning can be in spreading the ball around, and it may allow defenses to key on WRs Reggie Wayne and Pierre Garcon. Maybe Anthony Gonzalez can return to significant action for the first time since 2008, but this is a troubling sign for the Colts. Those injuries, plus the problems at safety where Melvin Bullitt is on IR and Bob Sanders is out until December, make the Colts look vulnerable, even though they’re a solid 4-2. The Colts are hoping that this isn’t the year that injuries catch up to them, but right now it looks like the horseshoe on their helmets isn’t nearly lucky enough.

Jaguars (add QBs Todd Bouman and Patrick Ramsey, cut S Gerald Alexander) – With David Garrard and Trent Edwards hurting, the Jags brought in QB reinforcements and may be forced to start Bouman against the Chiefs this week. Alexander has started the last three games for the Jags at safety, but now he’s gone. Jacksonville has gotten rid of two starters, Alexander and Anthony Smith, in the last week or so. That’s a big indictment on how the secondary has played this year.

Texans (cut OT Ephriam Salaam) – With starting OLT Duane Brown returning from his four-game suspension, the Texans released the veteran Salaam.

Bengals (activate S Tom Nelson from the physically unable to perform list) – Nelson was a key backup last year and even started three games, and now he’s finally recovered enough from a knee injury to get off the PUP list and on the field to help the Bengals.

Bears (cut DE Charles Grant) – The Bears brought Grant in a few weeks ago, but they quickly came to the same conclusion that the Dolphins and Saints did – that Grant no longer has it. Chicago promoted DE Barry Turner from the practice squad to take Grant’s place.

Lions (add LB Bobby Carpenter) – Carpenter, a former first-round pick, has bounced from Dallas to St. Louis to Miami over the past several months, and he lost his gig with the Dolphins after some crucial special-teams mistakes. But given the Lions’ lack of LB depth, Carpenter will get a defensive shot in Detroit. He’s at least worth a look to the Lions.

Browns (put OT Tony Pashos and DE Robaire Smith on injured reserve) – Pashos and Smith, both starters, are now out for the season for the Browns. That talent loss is a blow for a team that doesn’t have enough premium guys on the roster.

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FR: Pre-camp additions

In this post, we compare additions NFL teams made between the beginning of July and the beginning of NFL training camps. For previous signings from the offseason, go to the June signings post and work your way back.

10 – Bengals (add UFA WR Terrell Owens) – After a quiet year in Buffalo, T.O. had trouble finding a new job. But the Bengals finally stepped up just before training camp opened with a one-year, $2 million offer. It’s a massive pay cut for Owens, although that’s not unusual for NFL players at age 36. But it is a decent situation for Owens. He’ll have a better shot at playing time and targets than he would have with the Jets, another rumored suitor, and he’ll win more games than he would have as a Ram, which was another potential landing spot. Owens will be the possession receiver across from Chad Ochocinco, who had a renaissance year last season and still has some mid- and long-range ability. And Owens is probably good enough to beat out free-agent signee Antonio Bryant, who is plagued by a knee injury and could land on the physically unable to perform list. The trick will be spreading out the ball enough to keep Owens and Ochocinco, two star-sized egos, happy. But quarterback Carson Palmer pushed for Owens to come to town, and he knows enough stories to realize all that entails. The Bengals are a contender, and this addition helps their stock. They’re taking big risks in terms of character in their effort to win with players with locker-room issues as well as off-field issues (T.O. is exclusively in the former category), but it worked last year, and so they’re going all in with the strategy again.

9 – none

8 – Giants (add UFA LB Keith Bulluck) – Bulluck had a great career in Tennessee, but just as he approached free agency a late-season knee injury slowed his recruitment. Now he moves to New York, where he will be counted on to replace Antonio Pierce at middle linebacker. Bulluck played on the outside in Tennessee, and although he’s not huge he was a big-time play maker in the passing game. Now Bulluck will have to be a bit more disciplined to help center a Giants defense that fell apart last year. Still, given the market, Bulluck was the best option available for the Giants, and if he returns to his former Pro Bowl level or anything near it, he’ll be a huge addition. It’s worth a one-year, $2.5 million risk for a team that fancies itself a contender.

7 – Dolphins (add DEs Charles Grant and Marques Douglas and DT Montavious Stanley) – Grant, a former first-rounder in New Orleans, never lived up to the hype in the Big Easy, although he had 47 sacks and 30 passes batted down in his career. He’s big enough to move inside in a 3-4 defense and play the five-technique end, and he’ll help in that position. At age 31, if Grant takes to this role, he could really prolong his career, because there aren’t enough five-techniques out there. Douglas started 12 games for the Jets at defensive end last year and is a sturdy five-technique, even though he has little pass-rush pop. Still, adding two veterans who are starting-quality at this point is a big plus for the Dolphins. Stanley has bounced around a lot in his four NFL seasons, but he played OK as a backup in Jacksonville last year and should add depth for the Dolphins up front.

6 – Lions (add CB Dre Bly) – Cornerback has been a huge problem area for Detroit recently, and so they’re bringing back Bly, who most recently played in Denver. Bly will take over for William James as the Lions’ designated veteran and a starter who provides some stability on at least one side. Bly gambles more than most coaches like, but he is a replacement-level starter going to a team that had subpar options at the position.

6 (con’t) – Steelers (add OTs Flozell Adams and Adrian Jones) – After starting ORT Willie Colon suffered a season-ending injury in a July workout, the Steelers needed to add a starter and depth at tackle. Flozell the Hotel doesn’t move as well as he used to, which made him a liability on the left side in Dallas. But Adams is big enough to hold up as a run blocker, and that should make him a passable replacement for Colon in the starting lineup. Jones, who last played in 2008, has experience and adds depth.

5 – Buccaneers (add UFA OG Keydrick Vincent) – Vincent played well as a starter for the Panthers the last couple of years, and he can bring that kind of run-blocking presence to the Bucs. Carolina wanted to get younger, but the Bucs need to get better, and Vincent helps in that area.

4 – Seahawks (add UFA OG Chester Pitts) – Pitts, a long-time Texan, played pretty well before getting hurt in 2009. That injury kept him from finding a home until just before training camp. But he knows offensive line coach Alex Gibbs’ system, and that will help Gibbs implement in Seattle.

3 – Saints (keep DE Bobby McCray, add QB Patrick Ramsey) – The Saints cut McCray in the offseason and now bring him back at less than half the price, while giving McCray an opportunity to make up some of the difference via incentives. That’s a prudent financial move, given that McCray didn’t start any games last year and had just 12 tackles. He’s a sturdy defensive end who provides depth, but he doesn’t need to be a starter at this point in his career. Ramsey, a former first-round pick, finds his sixth team in six years. He’ll replace aging Mark Brunell as Drew Brees’ backup.

2 – Browns (add UFA WR Bobby Engram) – Engram has been around forever, and he had his best years in Seattle playing for Mike Holmgren. Now the 37-year-old comes to Cleveland as Holmgren’s choice as a veteran receiver. Engram shouldn’t start, but he’s a reliable receiver who can contribute in a No. 4 role and (more importantly) in the meeting room.

1 – Jets (add UFA QB Mark Brunell) – Brunell won a ring with the Saints last year, and now he moves to the Jets as a veteran backup to Mark Sanchez and Kellen Clemens. Brunell, who turns 40 in September, is probably better as an emergency guy at this point in his career, and he can fill that role in New York. Brunell be the No. 2 quarterback, but if Sanchez were to get hurt for a long stretch Clemens could get the call to start over Brunell.

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RP: The draft strategy that fails

As the NFL draft approaches, among the hot names are QBs Sam Bradford, Jimmy Clausen, Tim Tebow, and Colt McCoy. Part of this was because of Jon Gruden’s outstanding special on ESPN featuring all four QBs in the film room, but an even greater part is because of our obsession with quarterbacks. While Bradford will go No. 1 and Clausen will go in the first half of the first round (at least according to our mock draft), Tebow and McCoy have a far greater range of possibilities. One of them, of course, is having a team trade into the second half of the first round to take them. But our research shows that this strategy in the NFL draft is a poor one.

We looked back over the past 13 drafts to study the quarterbacks taken between 17 and 32. And it’s remarkable to look back and see how many of the teams who traded up to take one of these quarterbacks flat-out failed.

2009 – Josh Freeman, Buccaneers, 17th (trade up)
2008 – Joe Flacco, Ravens, 18th (trade up)
2007 – Brady Quinn, Browns, 22nd (trade up)
2006 – none
2005 – Aaron Rodgers, Packers, 24th; Jason Campbell, Redskins, 25th (trade up)
2004 – J.P. Losman, Bills, 22nd (trade up)
2003 – Kyle Boller, Ravens, 19th (trade up); Rex Grossman, Bears (trade down)
2002 – Patrick Ramsey, Redskins, 32nd (trade up)
2001 – Drew Brees, Chargers, 32nd (second round)
2000 – Chad Pennington, Jets, 18th
1999 – none
1998 – none
1997 – Jim Druckenmiller, 49ers
(This site helped us track trades up and down)

So six teams traded back into the first round to take quarterbacks – the Ravens for Boller and then Flacco, the Redskins for Ramsey and then Campbell, the Bills for Losman, and the Browns for Quinn. (The Freeman trade by the Bucs last year just moved them up two spots in the draft.) And of these six, only Flacco could be viewed as a success, and of the remaining five only Campbell has becomea regular starter for his team.

This bust rate of 66 percent is far above the general bust rate for first-round quarterbacks over the same time period, and it goes to show that teams anxious to find a quarterback of the future end up reaching for guys who aren’t able to succeed. Maybe this says more about the teams doing the reaching than about the players themselves – could any rookie QB have succeeded in the situation Losman found himself in in Buffalo, or in Quinn’s circumstances in Cleveland? Assign blame however you wish – the bottom line is that this is a strategy that fails.

This begs the question of whether a team should move into the first round this week to ensure that they get Tebow or McCoy, both of whom appear to be second-round talents. And the answer that our research shows is no. The teams that tend to employ this failed strategy tend not to be ready for such quarterbacks to come on board, and as a result the quarterbacks who need development and coaching don’t get it.

If teams employ this strategy Thursday night with Tebow and McCoy, it’ll be the draft strategy that fails once again.

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FR: Free agency (tri)weekly review pt. 4

The big moves on the free agent market are winding down, but as they do there are a couple worth noting. So we’ll compare the moves from the last 3 weeks (March 21-April 10) to each other, with 10 being the most significant of the week and 1 being the merely mentionable. For looks at previous moves, click on the part 3 post and then follow the links there for opening weekend, week 1, and week 2 relativity comparisons.

10 – Bears (add OTs Orlando Pace and Kevin Shaffer and S Glenn Earl) – The Bears had a huge need at offensive tackle after the retirement of John Tait and the departure of John St. Clair via free agency. Pace has battled injuries in recent years, but he stayed on the field for most of last season for the Rams. But St. Louis lurched into full rebuilding mode, and so Pace was cut. He lands in Chicago, where he will likely start at left tackle unless ‘08 first-rounder Chris Williams has taken 2 or 3 quantum leaps forward. With Pace, Williams, she Kevin Shaffer now on board, the Bears should be OK at tackle this year even given the injury histories of all three guys. It makes sense for the Bears to spend on Pace since so much is riding on Cutler’s performance and thus his protection. Shaffer can be a solid right tackle. His addition gives the Bears the flexibility  to put signee Frank Omiyale inside at guard, which would strengthen that spot as well. Shaffer, who was cut by Cleveland, could take the place of St. Clair, the guy who took his spot with the Browns. Earl once had promise, but he missed the last two years with injury. He’s worth a flier on a one-year deal to see if he’s healthy.

9 – Texans (add DT Shaun Cody and LBs Cato June and Buster Davis) – Cody, a former second-round pick, comes to Houston from Detroit as the second key defensive line addition of the offseason for the Texans (along with DE Antonio Smith). Cody will be more of a run-stuffer, but with Smith, Mario Williams, and Amobi Okoye, that’s precisely what the Texans need. Don’t be shocked if Cody isn’t part of the most improved defensive line in the league next year. He won’t be the most important part, but there’s definitely a role for him to play there. June, who has started in Indianapolis and Tampa Bay, is a classic weak-side linebacker in a 4-3 set. He’ll fit in as a likely starter in Houston and should be a minor step up. Davis is from that same system, so he should provide depth as well.

8 – none

7 – Ravens (kept CB Samari Rolle and QB Todd Bouman) – The Ravens had cut Rolle in a salary-cap move earlier this offseason, and they replaced him (and Chris McAlister) by signing Dominique Foxworth and Chris Carr to join Fabian Washington. Rolle isn’t the lockdown guy he used to be, but he’s a veteran hand who can still fit in as a contributor.  Bouman has started in the league, but his value is as a veteran third-stringer who lends some advice and experience to youngsters Joe Flacco and Troy Smith.

7 – Raiders (add QB Jeff Garcia and OT Marcus Johnson) – We’ve seen a lot of backup quarterback moves this offseason (including Kyle Boller to St. Louis and Patrick Ramsey to Tennessee this week), but this is the strangest. First of all, Garcia’s West Coast, dink-and-dunk style is a polar opposite to big-armed starter JaMarcus Russell. And while it might seem on the surface that Garcia could help mentor Russell, that’s never really been Garcia’s deal. He’s a good quarterback who wants to play and play well, and so his own play is his biggest concern. Maybe Garcia, now 39, has had a change of heart, but I doubt it. The temptation for the Raiders is going to be to play Garcia, because he will give them a better chance to win right away. Garcia is apt to fall into that tempting mindset too, which could cause a quarterback controversy. But Oakland must develop Russell if they are going anywhere anytime soon. So this move is just as likely to blow up in the Raiders’ faces as it is to work. But the impact of it keeps it high in this comparison.

6 – 49ers (add OT Marvel Smith) – Smith was a starter in Pittsburgh, but injuries limited him to just 17 games over the past two years. He now returns home to the Bay Area to replace Jonas Jennings as the 49ers’ right tackle. If Smith can stay healthy, this will be an upgrade for Frisco – bu that’s a big if.

6 (con’t) – Saints (add S Pierson Prioleau and DT Rod Coleman; kept QB Joey Harrington) – Prioleau is a borderline starting safetywho will replace Kevin Kaesviharn. That’s a minor upgrade, but with S Darren Sharper and CB Jabari Greer now in town, the Saints believed continuing the secondary overhaul would help in the long run. Coleman sat out last year, but he is a former Pro Bowler who is reunited with his Atlanta DL coach Bill Kollar. If he’s healthy, he’ll help a lot, but even becoming a situational pass rusher from the inside would be a benefit for the Saints. Harrington is nothing more than a third-string quarterback at this point.

5 – Redskins (kept DE Phillip Daniels; add LB Robert Thomas) – Washington cut Daniels earlier this offseason in a cap-related move but brought him back at a minimum salary. Daniels and fellow graybeard Renaldo Wynn will provide experienced depth at defensive end, and both are still good for 10-15 plays a game. Thomas is a vet who fits in as a backup.

5 (con’t) – Bengals (add DT Tank Johnson) – Johnson’s time in Dallas was fairly calm after his tumultous tenure in Chicago. While off-the-field problems have plagued Johnson, he’s a good rotation defensive tackle with a little bit of pass rushing upside. His talent is an upgrade for Cincy if he can stay on the field.

4- Rams (add QB Kyle Boller and TE Billy Bajema; kept OL Adam Goldberg) – Boller got a horrible rap in Baltimore, and he was far from consistent, but the former first-round pick also showed moments of promise. He comes in as the backup for Marc Bulger, and some teams still think Boller’s upside is worth a shot. I tend to agree. Bajema is a block-first tight end who the Rams want to use as a complement to Randy McMichael. Goldberg isn’t a starter, but he’s a valuable backup who actually started games at four different positions on the line for the Rams last year. He’ll be around as an insurance swingman for the next two years with his new deal.

4 (con’t) – Packers (add C-OG Duke Preston) – The Packers never seem to spend on free agents, so when they sign one it sticks out like a sore thumb. Preston started 11 games at center for the Bills last year, and the Packers think he can contribute at either center or guard. Expect him to be a starter next season.

4 (con’t) – Jets (add CB Donald Strickland) – Strickland, who was in San Francisco last year, has bounced around quite a bit. He’s probably a fourth corner who can move up to nickelback in a pinch. Thankfully, that’s what the Jets have planned for him, as Strickland will be behind Darrelle Revis and Lito Sheppard in the pecking order.

4 (con’t) – Chiefs (add OL Mike Goff) – Goff has been a starter his entire 11-year career, but his play has begun falling off to the point where it might be better for him to come off the bench. He’s proficient at playing guard or center, so he should fit in well as a swingman in K.C.

3 – Lions (keep OT George Foster; add C Dylan Gandy) – Foster, a former first-round pick, lost his starting job last year but is still an OK backup tackle.

3 (con’t) – Browns (add WR David Patten) – Patten won’t replace Joe Jurevicius, who was cut, much less Donte Stallworth, who faces charges after a lethal traffic accident. But this 13-year veteran, who played in Cleveland back in 2000, can be an adequate fourth receiver. This move will help as long as Patten isn’t asked to do much more.

3 (con’t) – Colts (keep LB Tyjuan Hagler, add LB Adam Seward) – Hagler returns to back up at all three linebacker positions, but don’t be surprised if he ends up starting outside. In a year with a lot of change on defense, having Hagler around is a bit of a security blanket for the Colts. Seward is a sturdy inside ‘backer who never broke through in Carolina. He’s slated to back up Gary Brackett in Indy. These moves help, but the Colts still have work to do before their linebacker corps is ready for action.

2 – Titans (add QB Patrick Ramsey) – Ramsey, a former first-rounder in Washington who settled in as a backup in Denver, comes to Tennessee to replace Chris Simms. He’s a favorite of returning Titans offensive coordinator Mike Heimerdinger, who spent time with him in Denver. Ramsey is certainly good enough to back up Kerry Collins, and so his presence will put a lot of pressure on Vince Young to get better. If Young doesn’t, he could be a third quarterback with no chance of seeing the field in ’09.

2 (con’t) – Cardinals (add FB Dan Kreider; kept CB Ralph Brown) – Kreider, a Ram last year, spent most of his career with the Steelers, and so he knows Cards head coach Ken Whisenhunt. He’s a useful role player. Brown is another vet who the Cards are keeping around on a one-year deal. He doesn’t need to start now that Arizona added Bryant McFadden to ’08 rookie sensation Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, but Brown can fill in as a nickelback in a pinch.

1- Vikings (kept FB Naufahu Tahi and DE Otis Grigsby) – The Vikings matched Cincinnati’s offer sheet for Tahi, a block-first fullback who stepped into the lineup the second half of last year. He allows the Vikings flexibility with their sets and can help pave the way for Adrian Peterson and Chester Taylor. Grisby was non-tendered as a free agent, but the Vikings were willing to bring him back for less money to be a backup.

1 (con’t) – Steelers (kept LB Keyaron Fox) – Fox got a two-year deal to hang around as a backup in Pittsburgh. He’s an asset on special teams, but he’s not special on defense.

1 (con’t) – Bills (add OG Seth McKinney) – McKinney shouldn’t start, but he’s a versatile interior lineman who won’ t kill you in a pinch.

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