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The last signings

Jeremy Shockey during a 2007 training camp Cat...

New Panther Jeremy Shockey. Image via Wikipedia

This may be the last week of NFL transactions for a long, long time. And as teams and players prepare for a potential lockout, a few deals are being made. So today and tomorrow, we’re going to look at these moves and their impact on the field in 2011. Today, we start with the last signings; tomorrow, we’ll look at salary-cap clearing cuts.

Saints add DT Shaun Rogers, keep RB Pierre Thomas – Rogers, who was released by the Browns last month, can still be a disruptive force inside. So you can see why the Saints wanted him in the middle of their defense. Rogers got a $4 million contract (reportedly $2 million less than he was offered elsewhere), which is pretty good money but reasonable for a starter. But it’s a good deal for the Saints, for two reasons. One, not many guys are available because of CBA limbo, and Rogers is clearly the best defensive lineman available at this point. And getting Rogers on a one-year deal should ensure that he stays motivated and focused throughout the season, since the carrot of another payday is out there. Give the Saints credit for anteing up and making a deal while they can. Thomas got a four-year, $12 million deal to remain in New Orleans after a rather contentious contract squabble throughout 2010. The deal is worth it to the Saints because they saw how their offense fell off when Thomas’ solid if unspectacular production wasn’t in the lineup in 2010 due to injury.

Chargers add S Bob Sanders – When healthy, Sanders is a premier in-the-box safety who hits like a ton of bricks and makes plays as a tackler, blitzer, and coverman. But Sanders has been healthy far too infrequently in the past three years, which led the Colts to cut their losses on the former defensive player of the year. But the Chargers were more than happy to take a one-year shot on Sanders, hoping to catch lightning in a bottle (or on the helmet?) and get a premium player for cheap. For a defense with far too few impact plays last year, it’s a good gamble. But Chargers fans should remember Sanders’ health problems just as much as they remember his highlight film.

Patriots add NT Marcus Stroud – Stroud, who had been released by Buffalo, moves within the AFC East to the Patriots. New England hopes that, like Gerard Warren last year, Stroud can provide sturdy play in a limited role. If he can do so, it will allow the Pats to use standout Vince Wilfork as a 3-4 defensive end in addition to a nose tackle, which makes the Pats defense more dangerous and more versatile. So for a contending team like the Patriots, giving Stroud a two-year deal to play a specific role makes sense.

Redskins add S O.J. Atogwe – The Redskins love to make a free-agency splash, but with the lockout looming, the pool of players was limited. Still, they spent big money on Atogwe, the turnover-causing machine from the Rams. Atogwe could combine with LaRon Landry, who had a breakout season in 2010, to provide an elite safety pair, and Atogwe’s ability in coverage makes him a nice compliment to Landry, who’s at his best in the box. Plus, Atogwe played some of his best ball in St. Louis under current Redskins defensive coordinator Jim Haslett. But the five-year, $26 million deal is miles beyond any other deal on this list, and it makes you wonder if this is a savvy move or an overreaching headline grab by the Skins.

Panthers add TE Jeremy Shockey – Shockey was released by the Saints after an injury-plagued tenure there, and now he lands with the division-rival Panthers on a one-year deal. His former University of Miami tight ends coach Rob Chudzinksi is the new offensive coordinator in Carolina, so there will be some familiarity for him there. Shockey is still a good (not great, but good) receiver, and if he can stay healthy he’ll add an element to the Panthers’ offense that hasn’t been there in a while.

Texans keep TE Owen Daniels – Daniels, who was miffed to get a restricted free-agent tender instead of a long-term deal last season, was paid off for his patience this year with a four-year deal worth up to $22 million with $13 million in guarantees. It rightfully pays Daniels as a top-10 tight end, which he has proven to be. Daniels’ receiving ability adds an important dimension to the Texans’ offense, and now that he’s healthy, it should help Matt Schaub and Andre Johnson find a few more openings for big plays.

Seahawks keep RB Leon Washington – Washington, whom the Seahawks acquired in a draft-day trade last offseason, got a four-year, $12.5 million deal with another $3.5 million in incentives. That’s a nice payday that Washington has been seeking for several years. Washington is an elite returner – he practically won a game against the Chargers by himself with two kickoff return touchdowns last year – and he is also a dangerous third-down back. The price may be steep, but Washington adds value in his role.

Bills keep OT Mansfield Wrotto and S George Wilson – Wrotto, whom the Bills signed off the scrap heap at midseason last year, ended up starting seven games for the Bills, earning a callback for 2011. Wilson serves as Buffalo’s special-teams captain and also has started some games at safety.

Giants keep RB Danny Ware – Ware, who has been the Giants’ third-string back the past couple of years, returns to provide depth. That’s important considering that Brandon Jacobs is likely on the outs and Ahmad Bradshaw is a free agent.

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Safety first no longer, part 2: Atogwe cut

Jump

The news among safeties (which began with Bob Sanders Friday) continued as the weekend continued. The Rams cut former franchise player Oshimogho Atogwe, while the Texans cut five players, headlined by starting safety Eugene Wilson. Below are thoughts on the moves.

In St. Louis, Atogwe developed a reputation as a ballhawk after causing 43 turnovers (forced fumbles plus interceptions) since becoming a starter in 2006. But his play in 2010 dropped a bit, and given the fact that the Rams would have owed an $8 million roster bonus early this week. So the Rams cut Atogwe, putting him on the open market. At age 30, Atogwe may have one more good contract in him, and the fact that he’s on the market for two-plus weeks before a potential lockout (when so few players are available) could help him get a quick deal. The Rams may be willing to bring him back at a lower price, and Atogwe has said he’s not opposed to the idea. But Atogwe would be best served to get a decent deal quickly instead of holding out for the last dollar.

In Houston, Wilson, a former Patriot, was released after three years with the Texans. WR Andre Davis was the most notable other cut, and the Texans saved more than $8 million in 2011 salary by cutting Wilson and Davis. While Wilson was a starter, Pro Football Focus had him rated as the third-worst safety in the league. Given the fact that the secondary was horrific for the Texans all year, it’s no surprise that Houston cut the cord on Wilson. They’ve be better off with a cheaper player, even if he was so inexperienced to make mistakes.  So the move is part of a bigger overhaul coming to the back third of the Texans D.

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FR: June signings

This post compares free-agent signings during the month of June. For past signings, go to the May signings post and work your way back.

10 – Raiders (add DT John Henderson) – Henderson was a salary-saving cut by the Jaguars, and he’s not the player he was at his Pro Bowl peak. But Henderson can still be a force inside, and at the worst he’s an upgrade over ’09 Raiders starter Gerard Warren. Henderson, like Richard Seymour last year, is an older player who can bring quality to a Raiders defense that isn’t bad. Plus, Henderson will help protect ’10 first-rounder Rolando McClain, which is a wise move as well. This is a nice late signing by the Raiders, who have had a solid offseason.

9 – Ravens (add UFA PK Shayne Graham, S Ken Hamlin, QB Marc Bulger, and UFA CB Walt Harris) – Graham had some great years with the Bengals, but last year wasn’t one of them, and the Bengals looked for a cheaper option. So Graham moves to Baltimore, where he figures to beat out Billy Cundiff at a spot that was a problem for the Ravens last year. Hamlin was a Pro Bowl participant just three seasons ago in Dallas, but his lack of range showed up over the last two years, and his play fell off to a level far below his contract. What Hamlin can still do is hit – he had 74 tackles last year and can still play as an in-the-box safety. But relying on him in coverage at this point will burn a team. In Baltimore, Ed Reed handles the backfield brilliantly, which makes a guy like Hamlin an acceptable safety counterpart. Maybe Hamlin finds the fountain of youth in Baltimore, but if he doesn’t, he can still help in a limited role. He’s still worth a shot for Baltimore on a one-year deal. Bulger was once a franchise quarterback in St. Louis, but years of playing behind a terrible offensive line sapped his effectiveness, led to injuries, and scuttled his starting career. So after posting three consecutive years with a 90-plus passer rating, Bulger has been pretty bad in recent years with his rating staying below 72. That’s a massive drop. The Rams have moved on to Sam Bradford, and now Bulger moves on to Baltimore. The Ravens are a good fit for Bulger because they have a solid offensive line and a top-flight running game, which means that if Bulger has to replace Joe Flacco, he’s set up to succeed. For the Ravens, meanwhile, Bulger provides a professional quarterback who’s just 33 and can be more of a long-term fill-in than Troy Smith at this point. This is a win-now move at $2.3 million that may not have been possible if not for the uncapped year. The signing of Harris is a similar transaction. Harris missed all of last season after an offseason injury, but before that he was a starter for some pretty good San Francisco defenses. Harris will be 36 when the season opens, but his more physical style can work in the right system. For a Ravens team that has really struggled at cornerback in recent years, Harris is the kind of veteran who may help younger players develop and who could even contribute on the field if the system makes up for his age-related shortcomings.

8 – Rams (keep UFA S O.J. Atogwe, add DT Chris Hovan) – Atogwe didn’t have his best season last year, which made restricted free agency a little dicey for the Rams and their former franchise player. But Atogwe is still a plus player for the Rams as he forces plenty of turnovers and makes big plays. Maybe the Rams would prefer Atogwe be more consistent, but his aggressiveness is still a benefit for a team bereft of playmakers. Keeping him once they had to let his restricted free-agent tender lapse was something the Rams needed to do to continue moving forward. Hovan hasn’t been a dominant player since his early days in Minnesota, but he’s still a starting-quality tackle who may be revived under Steve Spagnuolo, who had great success with defensive lines coaching the Giants. Hovan started all but one game over the last six seasons in Tampa, so at the least he’s a guy a rebuilding team can depend on to be there.

7 – none

6 – Chargers (add UFA WR Josh Reed, UFA TE Randy McMichael and OT Tra Thomas) – Both Reed and Thomas are solid pros, but neither is more than a fill-in at this point in his career. Thomas lost playing time to rookie Eugene Monroe in Jacksonville last year, but his years of experience at left tackle in Philadelphia are what San Diego’s looking at. If starting OLT Marcus McNeill holds out, Thomas has the know-how to be a stopgap option. But Thomas, who never was a dancer out on the edge, has lost mobility as he’s gotten older and could be exploited by speed rushers. Reed was a slot receiver in Buffalo, and while he can catch the ball reliably, he won’t break many plays. But if star WR Vincent Jackson holds out, San Diego needed some veterans who could at least run the right patterns, and Reed fills that bill. The more interesting things about both signings is not what these players bring but what it says about the Chargers’ hard-line stance against Jackson and McNeill. McMichael never lived up to his potential as a game-changing pass-catcher, but he’s been somewhat productive, and so he becomes a solid backup to Antonio Gates. He’s the kind of luxury bench signing a contender like the Chargers need to make.

5 – Bills (add LB Reggie Torbor) – Torbor got caught in a numbers game in Miami, but he’s a nice addition at inside linebacker for a Bills defense trying to move to a 3-4 this year. Like previous signee Andra Davis, Torbor does his job and tackles well. Neither Davis nor Torbor is a great player, but they’re good enough to provide stability until the Bills get playmakers in their linebacker corps.

4 – Seahawks (add S Kevin Ellison) – Ellison started nine games as a rookie for San Diego last year, but he was a surpising June cut by the Bolts. Seattle snapped him up quickly, first claiming him on waivers and then cutting him so that they could sign him to a new contract. If Ellison is going to succeed, Seattle’s a great place, since the former USC product is playing for his college head coach Pete Carroll.

3 – Redskins (add UFA Mike Furrey) – Furrey is perhaps the only two-way player in the league right now, as he can contribute at safety or wide receiver. It’s at wideout that the Redskins need help, since Santana Moss could be facing a league suspension stemming from his connection to Dr. Anthony Galea. Furrey has had one huge catch season, but he’s primarily a slot receiver who runs good routes and has good quickness. He can help the Redskins in three- or four-WR sets.

2 – Vikings (add RB Ryan Moats via waivers) – Moats had his moments in Houston last year, and he played for Vikings head man Brad Childress back in Philadelphia. So when Adrian Peterson started sitting out of minicamps, the Vikes didn’t hesitate to take the opportunity to claim Moats. Moats’ pass-catching acumen could mean that he gets some shots over rookie Toby Gerhardt in replacing Chester Taylor.

1 – Saints (add OG Terrence Metcalf) – Metcalf was out of the league last year, but he had a seven-year career with the Bears and could fit in as a backup guard.

1 (con’t) – Steelers (add LB Matt Stewart) – Stewart didn’t play last season, but as a starter in four of his six NFL seasons with Atlanta and Cleveland, he could provide depth at inside linebacker for the Steelers.

1 (con’t) – Broncos (add UFA FB Kyle Eckel and RB Kolby Smith via waivers) – Eckel is a borderline fullback who played for Josh McDaniels in New England. That’s the reason he has a shot to make Denver’s roster as a fullback, especially after Peyton Hillis left via trade. Smith has shown a few flashes in Kansas City, which makes him worth a waiver claim.

1 (con’t) – Colts (add QB Tom Brandstater via waivers) – Brandstater, once a prospect in Denver, got claimed on waivers by the Colts, who need to develop a backup to Peyton Manning now that Jim Sorgi is gone. Brandstater will compete with fellow ’09 rookie Curtis Painter for that spot, and only one of them will likely make the team.

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Franchise players summary

Earlier this offseason, we analyzed the 14 NFL franchise players using a Football Relativity comparison. Yesterday was a deadline for those guys to sign long-term deals, and I thought we’d do a summary of what happened with them.

(Credit to Mike Sando of ESPN.com for compiling all this info.)

Of the 14 franchise players:

One was traded – Matt Cassel. He was dealt from the Patriots to the Chiefs, along with Mike Vrabel, for a second-round draft pick. Cassel signed a six-yera, $63 million deal with $28 million guaranteed just before the deadline, replacing his $14 million franchise tender.

One had the tag removed – Leroy Hill. After drafting Aaron Curry, the Seahawks took the $8 million tag off of Hill. They then signed Hill to a more cost-effective deal, six years and $38 million with $15 million guaranteed.

Three franchise players signed long-term deals – Max Starks, Brandon Jacobs, and Terrell Suggs. Suggs (whose T-Sizzle nickname we should have included in this post) signed just before the deadline, inking a 6-year, $63 million deal with $38 million guaranteed. Starks, who wasn’t a full-time starter in ’08 but should be in ’09, got a four-year, $26 million deal with $10 million guaranteed. And Jacobs got a four-year, $25 million contract with $13 million guaranteed. All of these players, plus Cassel and even Hill, ended up with more guaranteed money than they would have had if they had played under the franchise tender in ’09.

Eight players signed their franchise tenders. They are guaranteed their tender amounts for the year no matter what, and they are not under contract for 2010. They are:

DE Julius Peppers, Carolina ($16.683 million)
LB Karlos Dansby, Arizona ($8.3 million)
WR Antonio Bryant, Tampa Bay ($9.844 million)
RB Darren Sproles, San Diego ($6.6 million)
S O.J. Atogwe, St. Louis ($6.3 million)
TE Bo Scaife, Tennessee ($4.46 million)
P Michael Koenen, Atlanta ($2.483 million)
PK Shayne Graham, Cincinnati ($2.483 million)

One player, Dunta Robinson, has not yet signed his tender. He can’t negotiate a long-term contract, so his only option to play in ’09 is to sign a one-year, $9.957 million deal and play for the Texans.

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