Tag Archives: nick griesen

FR: Training Camp Injuries

As happens most year, there have been several notable injuries in training camps this year. Here is a comparison of the players who have suffered significant injuries in training camps this summer, with the 10 level being the most significant injuries and 1 being the least significant. This post does not include minicamp injuries; you can find a comparison of those losses here.

A few notes: We’ve only included injuries that could affect regular-season play. And we’ll continue to update this post through the fourth preseason game; we’ll do invidiual posts of major injuries and link back here.

10 – Panthers DT Maake Kemeoatu – Kemeoatu is the Panthers’ anchor on the defensive line. He has used his tremendous size to clog the middle and keep blockers off of MLB Jon Beason. His presence also allows fellow DT Damione Lewis to slash through the line and rush the passer more often, which maximizes Lewis’ value. The Panthers don’t have any backup DTs with any experience, so they’re likely going to have to add some depth via free agency or the waiver wire just to set up a four-man DT rotation. Regardless, this injury could make Carolina much more susceptible to the run.

9 – Eagles MLB Stewart Bradley – Bradley suffered a torn anterior cruciate ligament. Bradley emerged as a starter in Philly last year, totalling 108 tackles, 86 of them solos. He’s a big thumper who provides the kind of stability that a 4-3 defense needs inside. With Bradley now almost certainly out for the year, the Eagles will turn to Omar Gaither or Joe Mays or recent addition Matt Wilhelm to fill in. Regardless of who steps in, it’s going to be a drop-off from what Bradley could do.

8 – Seahawks OLT Walter Jones – Jones, who quietly has been an all-time great at offensive tackle, was trying to come back from microfracture knee surgery, but he suffered a setback and had to have a follow-up surgery during training camp. The Seahawks are saying he’s out indefinitely, which could mean anything from a return at the beginning of the season to the end of Jones’ Hall-of-Fame-caliber career. The Seahawks don’t have a successor in place, so losing Jones for any amount of time is a monster problem for them.

7 – Panthers LB Jon Beason – Beason, the Panthers’ Pro Bowl middle linebacker, suffered a torn MCL in the second preseason game. That’s usually a 4-to-6 week injury, which would indicate that Beason could miss up to the first month of the regular season. Reports indicate that the Panthers hope it’s a mild enough sprain that Beason will be able to play before that, which would be a huge boon to the Panthers. Remember that Carolina already lost DT Maake Kemeoatu, and consider that the Panthers don’t have enough of a depth of defensive playmakers to replace another key starter.

7 (con’t) – Saints OLT Jammal Brown – Brown, an emerging star at left tackle, had surgery to repair a sports hernia in late August. The Saints still hope he can return to open the regular season, but that would be an especially optimistic timetable. A more normal recovery is 1-2 months, which would cost Brown the first 4-6 games of the regular season. The fact that Brown’s backup has also been dinged up in the preseason makes Brown’s speedy return even more possibly.

6 – TE Cornelius Ingram, Eagles – Ingram was a fifth-round pick who looked like a steal because his athletic ability merited a higher pick but a college knee injury depressed his draft stock. But that potential went bust when Ingram tore the ACL in his left knee during training camp. It’s the second time Ingram has done that, and that makes the chance that Ingram will ever contribute pretty remote. It’s a shame, because Ingram was a nice prospect. Now the Eagles must rely heavily on Brent Celek to bring them some offense over the middle.

6 (con’t) – WR Harry Douglas, Falcons – Douglas emerged as a big-play threat (actually a triple threat) as a rookie last year for Atlanta, and he added a pretty interesting dynamic to the Falcons’s offense. But he tore an ACL in training camp and now will miss the season. That’ll hurt the Falcons’ ability to threaten defenses out of multi-receiver sets, and with Roddy White holding out, it could quickly become an even more significant blow.

6 (con’t) – Bengals TE Reggie Kelly – Kelly is a starting tight end who doesn’t catch many balls but still makes an impact by being a fantastic blocker. His absence will likely cause the Bengals to change the way they approach offense, but it could actually open up snaps for rookie Chase Coffman, who has a lot of potential as a pass-catcher.

6  (con’t) – TE Ben Utecht, Bengals – Utecht, who was probably going to start for the Bengals at tight end, suffered a nasty concussion that will cost him the season. With Utecht and Reggie Kelly out, the Bengals are counting on rookie Chase Coffman pretty signficantly.

6 (con’t) – Giants DT-LS Jay Alford – Alford is a key member of the Giants’ defensive line rotation, and he also serves as the team’s long-snapper. But in the team’s second preseason game, he suffered a knee injury that tore his MCL and partially tore his ACL. He’ll be out for the year. This injury hurts on two fronts – the Giants’ defense, which attacks so much that depth is vital, and on special teams as well. Alford’s potential as a penetrating pass rusher will be missed.

5 – Lions DE Jared DeVries – DeVries, a usual starter over the past three years in Detroit, ruptured his Achilles tendon and will miss the year. DeVries isn’t wonderful, but he’s a legitimate rotation guy and an average starter in the NFL. For a team as devoid of depth as Detroit still is, losing that kind of guy is a big blow.

5 (con’t) – Ravens OT Adam Terry – Terry, who was slated to compete with Michael Oher for the starting right tackle job and then settle into a role as the primary backup at both tackle spots, had a knee injury that just wasn’t getting better, so during the first week of camp he had a surgery that will cost him the entire ’09 season. His absence limits the Ravens’ experience but shouldn’t be a deathknell because Baltimore has done a good job of accumulating depth.

5 (con’t) – Buccaneers LB Angelo Crowell – Crowell, a former standout in Buffalo, signed with the Buccaneers in the offseason to be a starter after missing the entire ’08 season. But a torn biceps muscle will bench Crowell for the entire ’09 season as well. That hurts a Bucs defense that let a lot more talent go in the offseason than what they brought in. Crowell’s veteran wile will be missed in what looks like a rebuilding season in Tampa Bay.

5 (con’t) – QB Matt Cassel, Chiefs – Cassel, the Chiefs’ starting quarterback, suffered a sprained MCL and an ankle injury in the third preseason game, and it could cost him up to two regular-season games. That’s a huge blow to the Chiefs, who are counting on Cassel to provide QB stability for the franchise over the long term. This injury could also inhibit K.C.’s ability to trade QB Tyler Thigpen for a draft pick, as it had hoped.

5 (con’t) – Bears RB Kevin Jones – Jones, who was slated to be Matt Forte’s primary backup this season, tore an ankle ligament and will miss the entire season. Jones, who had a major knee injury in Detroit that cost him an entire season, now must rehab again. That’s a bad break for him and a blow to the Bears, who thought Jones was a higher-quality backup than Adrian Peterson (the other one) or Garrett Wolfe.

4 – WR Brandon Jones, 49ers – Jones, whom the Niners signed in the offseason to bolster their receiving corps, could miss up to four regular-season games with a broken shoulder. That’s a big blow, because aside from Isaac Bruce, Jones is probably the most experienced wideout San Fran has. Jones and Josh Morgan will still be fighting for a starting job, but this injury gives Morgan an edge in that battle. And Michael Crabtree (in the midst of an acrimonious holdout) could figure in later this offseason as well. But the Niners probably need all four receivers to contribute, and this injury limits the chance of that happening.

4 (con’t) – RB Andre Brown, Giants – Brown, a rookie out N.C. State, was the guy the Giants drafted as they tried to replace Derrick Ward in their Earth, Wind, and Fire running back corps. But Brown ruptured the Achilles tendon in his left leg in the opening preseason game and will miss the season. That’s a blow both to the Giants and to this promising runner, because he is good enough that he could have helped in a complementary role this season.

4 (con’t) – WR Chaz Schilens, Raiders – Schilens isn’t a household name, but he was actually slated to be the Raiders’ No. 1 wideout this season before he broke a bone in his left foot in mid-August. If the injury follows the normal course of healing, it will sideline Schilens until early-to-mid October. That’s a shame, not just because Schilens showed so much promsie as a rookie but also because we all need more guys named Chaz in our lives.

4 (con’t) – S Daniel Bullocks, Lions – Bullocks started 15 games last season, and as a former second-round pick he still has some potential. But he’s also dealing with a lingering knee injury that will end up costing him the entire 2009 season.

4 (con’t) – Seahawks C Chris Spencer – Walter Jones isn’t the only Seahawk lineman who’s hurting. Spencer, the starting center, has an injured left quadriceps, and the team has yet to figure out how many regular-season games he’ll miss, although it will be at least a couple. At least rookie Max Unger could step in for Spencer, a former first-round pick who has turned into a decent center. But losing two offensive line starters, even if it’s just for a handful of games, will most likely put a significant crimp in Seattle’s offensive style.

4 (con’t) – Bears DT Dusty Dvoracek – Dvoracek, once a second-round pick, now sees his season ended early by injury for the fourth time in four years, this time with a torn ACL. That’s a blow to the Bears, who are going to have to limit stud DT Tommie Harris’ snaps to keep his aching knees as healthy as possible. This injury probably will spell the end of Dvoracek’s Bears tenure as well, because it’s hard to see a team counting on a guy who has been injured so often once again next season.

4 (con’t) – Cardinals OLB Cody Brown – Brown, the Cardinals’ second-round pick this year, is a pass-rushing linebacker from Connecticut who was expected to find a rotation role for Arizona this year. He and Calais Campbell were slated to help replace the potent rush of Antonio Smith, who moved to Houston via free agency. But Brown broke his wrist and will miss the entire season. That hurts his development and takes a defensive weapon away for a defense that could use him.

3 – LB Nick Griesen, Broncos – Griesen was one of the myriad veteran free agents Denver brought in during the offseason to create depth. However, he suffered a knee injury on Aug. 3 that will cost him the season. His intelligence and experience in a 3-4 defense would have helped, but he looked to be more of a backup than a starter, so this loss doesn’t look to hamper Denver too much in the long run.

3 (con’t) – WR Syndric Steptoe, Browns – Steptoe had 19 catches as a rookie last year, but he’ll miss his second year with a shoulder injury. The most interesting thing about this injury is that Steptoe’s agent blames Browns head coach Eric Mangini for it. Steptoe was hurt in a practice conducted at full speed in a driving rain. Maybe this lends a little more credibility to our argument against Bill Belichick lieutenants succeeding as NFL head coaches. It’s a shame for Steptoe, who actually had some promise.

3 (con’t) – TE Tory Humphrey, Packers – Humphrey broke his forearm in training camp and will miss the entire season for the second time in three years. He has showed promise as a receiving tight end, but given his injury history it’s unlikely Green Bay will rely on him again.

3 (con’t) – LB Mark Simoneau, Saints – Simoneau was once a starter in New Orleans, but a right triceps injury will force him to miss the entire season for the second straight year. That limits New Orleans’ LB depth, which is already short because of Stanley Arnoux’s minicamp injury, and it caused the Saints to start looking at veteran ‘backers like Derrick Brooks.

3 (con’t) – P Josh Bidwell, Buccaneers – Bidwell had so much soreness in his hip that the Buccaneers opted to sideline him for the year and replace him with Dirk Johnson. The one-time Pro Bowl pick is a consistent punter, if not the biggest leg in the league, so losing him will sting – especially if Johnson struggles as much as he has in recent years.

3 (con’t) – LB Cato June, Texans – June was a starter with Indy and Tampa Bay, but at age 28 he was trying to start over and find a role in Houston. While he had the look of a future starter, he was running with the third team when he broke his arm just before the second preseason game. It will cost him the season.

3 (con’t) – Cowboys OT Robert Brewster – Brewster, a third-round pick, was projected as a backup tackle for the Cowboys. Instead, he’s going to be on injured reserve and miss the season after tearing a pectoral muscle. Given the age of Dallas’ tackles, this move could end up hurting more than it would appear at first glance.

3 (con’t) Broncos QB Chris Simms – So much for a quarterback competition in Denver. Simms, who had an opening to try to seize the starting job from Kyle Orton after Orton’s up-and-down performance in the first two preseason games, suffered a high ankle sprain that will cost him the last two preseason games and could hinder him in the first few weeks of the season. It’s another in a long list of injuries for Simms in his career.

3 (con’t) – WR Jabar Gaffney, Broncos – Gaffney, brought over from New England to be Denver’s reliable outside receiver, suffered a broken thumb that will cost him a few regular-season games.

3 (con’t) – OG Darnell Stapleton, Steelers – Stapleton started 12 games for the Steelers last year, and helped to stabilize an offensive line that struggled much of the year. But he suffered a knee injury early in training camp and will miss the whole season.

2- WR Donnie Avery, Rams – Avery hurt his leg in training camp and could miss the season opener. He’s vital to the Rams’ offensive plans this year, because he’s their No. 1 receiver. In fact, Avery is the only receiver for the Rams who’s even semi-proven in the NFL. So missing him for any games is a huge deal for St. Louis.

2 (con’t) – CB Jacque Reeves, Texans – Reeves broke a leg early in training camp and should miss at least a couple of games in the regular season, if not more. Reeves was a starter, and his absence could be compounded by the holdout of Dunta Robinson. Missing both of those players to start the season would really inhibit Houston’s ability to defend the pass, which is why the Texans added Deltha O’Neal after Reeves was hurt.

2 (con’t) – OT Khalif Barnes, Raiders – Barnes broke a leg in the first week of August and should miss some early regular-season action. He was slated to be the team’s starting left tackle after signing a one-year deal in the offseason, and so his absence will hurt the Raiders. But this falls to the bottom of this list because the Raiders don’t appear to be much of a contender even in the mediocre AFC West.

2 (con’t) – TE Dan Campbell, Saints – Campbell had only played three games over the past two seasons because of a knee injury, and it just didn’t get better. He’s a good blocking tight end, but given this chronic knee injury, his 11-year career looks to be nearing the end.

2 (con’t) – WR Marcus Smith, Ravens – Smith, a fourth-round pick in 2008, was slated to perhaps become the Ravens’ No. 4 receiver after a rookie season in which he played seven games without a catch. Instead, he tore an ACL and will miss the season.  The significance of this injury is about Smith’s potential but also about the lack of depth the Ravens have at receiver.

2 (con’t) – Cowboys LB Brandon Williams – Like fellow rookie Brewster, Williams will miss the season. He has a torn ACL. Williams, a fourth-round pick, was slated to be a backup linebacker and likely a special-teams contributor.

2 (con’t) – Rams WR Brooks Foster – Foster, one of myriad young receivers who are trying to find playing time in a rebuilt corps, suffered a high ankle sprain in the first preseason game and had surgery two weeks later. The fifth-round pick will be out 4-6 games, but that might be long enough for the Rams to put him on IR and save him for 2010.

2 (con’t) – OLG Todd Herremans, Eagles – Philly’s starting left guard will miss the first regular-season game with a left foot injury.

2 (con’t) – CB Brandon Hughes, Chargers – Hughes, a fifth-round pick, will miss the entire season with a knee injury he suffered late in training camp.

2 (con’t) – OLs Ryan Tucker and Fred Weary, Browns – As they tried to stabilize their offensive line, the Browns signed Weary and kept veteran Tucker around. But both suffered knee injuries in training camp, and both are now on injured reserve.

2 (con’t) – WR Devard Darling, Chiefs – Darling, once a promising prospect in Baltimore, suffered a knee injury and will miss the season. The Chiefs had Darling as a starter on the depth chart, and while that wasn’t going to last, Darling would have made the team and contributed.

2 (con’t) – CB Don Carey, Jaguars – Carey was a sixth-round pick in Cleveland, and when he injured his shoulder, the Browns tried to stash him on injured reserve. But because he had to clear waivers first, he was available, and the Jaguars grabbed him. Jacksonville will stash Carey on injured reserve this season and then see if they can develop him in 2010.

1 – OT Damion Scott, Lions – Scott was an occasional starter in Detroit last year, but as the Lions added depth this offseason, Scott’s roster spot began looking precarious. But that’s moot now, because Scott tore a triceps muscle and will miss the season.

1 (con’t) – LB Cody Spencer, Lions – Spencer was brought over from the Jets to provide depth at linebacker, but he’ll miss the season with a knee injury. For a team as thin as Detroit is, any loss like this stings.

1 (con’t) – WR Roy Hall, Colts – Hall was competing for the Colts’ No. 3 receiver job with rookie Austin Collie and Pierre Garcon, but injuries plagued him throughout his three-year career and knocked him out for the season this year. At this point, it’s hard to see Hall getting another shot in Indy, which is a shame because the Colts could use a young wideout as promising as him.

1 (con’t) – WR Chris Davis, Titans – Davis was fighting a hamstring injury, but the fact that he got arrested during his rehab doomed him. That’s why Tennessee waived/injured him, which should land him on injured reserve for the year.

1 Comment

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Injuries

Free-agency review – post-draft through May

The free agent moves should start slowing down at this point, but there are still enough of them that it’s worth comparing them. This relativity comparison includes moves starting after draft day all the way through the the month of May. If you want to see previous comparisons, check out this post and move back from there.

10 – Seahawks (keep LB Leroy Hill; add CB Ken Lucas, FB Justin Griffith and LS Bryan Pittman) – Hill was Seattle’s franchise player, but the team pulled the tag off of him after drafting Aaron Curry. But the team still wanted to keep Hill, and so they ended up hammering out a long-term deal with him. Instead of a one-year, $8 million deal, Hill gets a six-year pact worth up to $38 million with $15.5 million guaranteed. He’s a solid player who will team with Curry and Lofa Tatupu to give Seattle a terrific (if expensive) linebacker trio. Lucas was a Seahawk for six years before moving to Carolina for big free-agent dollars. He’s a big physical corner who doesn’t have great speed but doesn’t need it for his style of play. It wasn’t that long ago that Lucas was a top-5 corner in the league. In fact, the Seahawks never were able to replace Lucas’ physicality after he left following the ’04 season. He probably shouldn’t be a No. 1 corner anymore, but he’s still a solid No. 2. Griffith is the prototypical fullback for a West Coast offense. Pittman had spent five-plus years as the Texans’ long snapper before being sidelined in the StarCaps case last year. He is a professional long snapper who fills a spot that’s been a void in Seattle the last couple of years.

10 (con’t) – Dolphins (add DE Jason Taylor) – Taylor and the Dolphins had an acrimonious divorce last offseason, as Taylor went Dancing with the Stars while new team grand poobah Bill Parcells laid down the law. The Fins dealt Taylor to Washington, but knee and calf injuries limited Taylor’s effectiveness. He played in 13 games, but managed just 3.5 sacks. After the season, Taylor decided he would rather spend the offseason at home in Florida than in the ‘Skins training program, so he asked for his release (and gave up $8 million in the process). Now, he lands back with Miami on a one-year, $1.1 million deal. Taylor had a great career in Miami (117 sacks in 11 years), and he really wants to be a Dolphin again. The team hopes that he can go opposite of Joey Porter to accelerate the team’s pass rush. Motivation shouldn’t be a question for Taylor, who seems excited to be back. And in a limited role, he should still be a quality contributor. All in all, it’s a good investment for the Dolphins, who get a pass rusher and a fan favorite for a budget-conscious price. In the end, the Dolphins got a second-rounder from Washington but only lost Taylor’s services for a year.

9 – Bengals (add S Roy Williams) – Williams had some good seasons as an in-the-box safety in Dallas, even reaching Pro Bowl level. But over recent years, his performance has plummeted as his coverage inadequacies have been exposed. That, plus a hefty price tag, led the Cowboys to cut the cord. Now he heads to Cincinnati, where he’s reunited with ex-Cowboys defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer. Zimmer knows what Williams does well and what he can’t do, which gives the Bengals a little better than average chance to use Williams well. Plus, his veteran leadership could help a team that’s slowly building a new defensive nucleus around LBs Keith Rivers and Rey Maualuga. On a short-term, incentive-laden deal, it’s easy to see why Cincinnati would take this shot.

9 (con’t) – 49ers (add CB Dre Bly) – The 49ers replaced Walt Harris, who blew out his ACL in minicamp, with Bly, a fellow veteran who has been a long-term starter in Denver, Detroit, and St. Louis and has 40 career interceptions and Pro Bowl nods in ’03 and ’04.. Bly isn’t as big as Harris, and he’s more of a gambler, but he will provide the expertise and veteran play that San Fran needs across from Nate Clements. Bly is also three years younger, and so while he’s not in his prime anymore, he’s not that far past it. It will be interesting to see if Bly’s ball-hawking style fits Mike Singletary’s approach as well as Harris’ more physical play did. But given how late in free agency Harris’ injury happened, Bly is about the best option the 49ers could have come up with. They needed corner help badly, and they got it in this veteran.

8 – Lions (add LB Larry Foote, OTs Jon Jansen and Ephriam Salaam, OG Toniu Fonoti, and DEs Eric Hicks and Jason Hunter) – Foote had been cut in Pittsburgh for salary-cap reasons. Not only is Foote a Michigan native and alum, he’s an extremely solid inside ‘backer on running downs. He has limitations and probably shouldn’t be trying to drop into coverage, but he is a quality NFL starter who definitely upgrades Detroit’s lion-up. (Sorry.) It’s only a one-year deal, but if Foote provides leadership that term could be extended. Regardless, the Lions’ defense is better today because Foote is there. Jansen quickly latched on with the Lions on a one-year, minimum-salary deal. Like ILB Larry Foote, he’s a Michigan alum who comes home to try to help the first steps of Detroit’s rebuilding process. He might not start, but he provides depth at a trouble spot and should help to mentor ‘08 first-rounder Gosder Cherilus. That’s a good deal for the Lions at the vet minimum. Salaam has started 129 games in his 11 NFL seasons, but he became a backup in Houston last year. Still, given the fact that Detroit didn’t draft a tackle this year, Salaam could find a role for a single season, even with Jansen now around. Hicks and Fonoti are veterans who may not have much left but who are worth a look for a team as talent-depleted as Detroit. Hunter lost his spot in Green Bay when the Packers moved to a 3-4 defense, but he can contribute as a 4-3 end in Detroit.

7 – Browns (add CB Rod Hood and WR Mike Furrey) – Hood, who had started the last two years for the Cardinals, was shoved aside after Arizona added Bryant McFadden. Hood is a big, physical corner who is apt to give up the big play but is an asset against the run and is good enough to start. He steps into a weak spot on the depth chart in Cleveland, and he should surpass Corey Ivy, Eric Wright, or Brandon McDonald to continue as a starter there. As long as the Browns don’t count on him for much man coverage, Hood will help. Meanwhile, the Browns are in serious upheaval at wide receiver. They’ve cut the cord on Joe Jurevicius, and we now must expect Donte Stallworth to miss some time with legal matters related to a deadly car accident he was involved in last year. And that doesn’t even address the persistent Braylon Edwards trade rumors. So Cleveland has tried to reload at receiver, by signing David Patten and drafting Brian Robiskie and Mohammed Massaquoi in the second round. Now they add Mike Furrey, who bounced through the XFL and the Arena League before establishing himself as a legit NFL receiver. Furrey’s best success has come in Mike Martz systems in St. Louis and Detroit, and he doesn’t have great size, but it’s still easy to see him as an effective inside receiver. If nothing else, he’ll try hard and give some level of certainty at a very uncertain position for Cleveland.

6 – Colts (kept LB Freddie Keiaho and DT Ed Johnson) – The Colts didn’t tender Keiaho a contract as a restricted free agent even though he was a starter last season. But they’re bringing him back on a one-year deal to help in a problem area. Keiaho’s small, but he makes enough plays to warrant some snaps. Johnson is a talented defensive tackle who the Colts let go last year after a drug-possession arrest. He fits a need, and the Colts are making it clear that Johnson has a supershort leash. But if he takes advantage of another chance, he’ll help.

6 (con’t) – Saints (add DE Anthony Hargrove) – Hargrove sat out the entire ’08 season after his third violation of the league’s substance abuse policy. He has been reinstated, which makes him valuable to the Saints, who need DE depth for the first four games of the season pending the disputed suspensions of DEs Will Smith and Charles Grant. Both of those starters face four-game bans for using performance-enhancing substances, but they are appealing in court, and no final decision has come down. So Hargrove ends up being a talented insurance policy if he can stay clean.

5 – Patriots (add LB Paris Lenon S Brandon McGowan) – Lenon led the Lions in tackles last year with 121, but he figures in more as a backup in New England. He adds depth and probably fills the roster spot that injured third-round pick Tyrone McKenzie would have occupied. McGowan missed all of last season with an injury, but the former Bear is a physical safety who can step in if rookie Patrick Chung isn’t ready to go for the Pats. With Rodney Harrison likely done, the Pats are wise to add some depth at safety.

5 (con’t) – Raiders (add FB Lorenzo Neal, RB Gary Russell, TE J.P. Foschi and S Keith Davis) – Neal has long been the best blocking fullback in the league. He’s still a hammer who can help open holes for Oakland’s talented running backs. Russell is a backup type who had a short-yardage role in Pittsburgh last year. But he’s unlikely to get many carries or even make the opening-game roster with Darren McFadden, Justin Fargas, and Michael Bush ahead of him on the depth chart. Davis played seven years in Dallas and established himself as a special-teams ace, and last year he started half the year at safety. The Raiders probably need someone better to start, but Davis can be a good backup and a very good contributor on specialty units.

4 – Broncos (add LB Nick Griesen and RB Darius Walker) – Griesen was a backup in Baltimore, and so he knows the 3-4 defense and could fit in for Denver, which is implementing the defense but is still looking for players to start, much less fill roles. Walker showed some promise during his two years in Houston, but he’s not of the caliber of Denver’s top running backs Knowshon Moreno, Correll Buckhalter, or even holdover Peyton Hillis.

4 (con’t) – Bears (add LB Pisa Tinoisamoa and TE Michael Gaines) – Tinoisamoa has limitations, but he fits in as a two-down linebacker alongside Brian Urlacher and Lance Briggs in Chicago. The Tower (of Pisa) knows Bears coach Lovie Smith from the St. Louis days, so the defense will be familiar. Tinoisamoa is a clean-up tackler who doesn’t make a ton of big plays, but he won’t need to with superstars Briggs and Urlacher there. He should help to stabilize the defense and allow Briggs and Urlacher a bit more freedom to attack, both of which are advantages for the Bears. This seems to be a good fit for the Tower. Gaines is a bulky blocking tight end who doesn’t figure as a receiving threat behind Greg Olsen and Desmond Clark but could be useful as a jumbo-package role player. It’s a shame the Bears have three legit tight ends but such a paucity of wideouts.

3 – Chiefs (add C Eric Ghiacius) – Ghiacius started all 16 games at center for the Bengals last year, and he’ll compete with Rudy Niswanger for a starting job in K.C. Ghiacius is a marginal NFL starter, but it will help the Chiefs to have another veteran around for the sake of depth and competition.

3 (con’t) – Steelers (add WR Shaun McDonald, P Dirk Johnson and RB Verron Haynes) – McDonald had a big year in ’07 with Detroit, but when Mike Martz left his role in the offense diminished. McDonald is small but quick. He fits in as a third or fourth receiver in Pittsburgh, but having a veteran like him around is smart because the Steelers still don’t know how second-year WR Limas Sweed will develop. Johnson, who punted in 13 games for the Cardinals last season, is a marginal NFL punter, but he will at least provide some competition at a spot that was a problem for Pittsburgh last year. Haynes was a long-time Steeler who didn’t play last year. He could end up as a backup running back in a bit role.

2 – Ravens (add QB John Beck and WR Kelley Washington) – After the emergence of Joe Flacco last year, the Ravens don’t really have a quarterback need. They have a young starter and a young promising backup in Troy Smith. But Ravens offensive coordinator Cam Cameron drafted Beck in the second round when he was the head coach in Miami, and so he obviously sees potential in him. So the Ravens gave Beck a one-year contract that could last longer because Beck, with just two years of service time, will be controlled by the Ravens for at least one additional season. This is a low-risk move that could pay off in terms of a future trade if Cameron can restore the luster Beck once had as a prospect. Washington is a big, rangy receiver who had some success as a receiver in Cincinnati but never lived up to his potential. Then he went to New England and became a standout special-teamer, which speaks well of his character as a teammate. He’ll find a special-teams role in Baltimore and provide needed depth at receiver, but it’s unlikely that he’ll move too far up the depth chart.

2 (con’t) – Redskins (add WR Roydell Williams and OT Jeremy Bridges) – The Redskins won’t have WR depth until second-year players Devin Thomas and Malcolm Kelly develop, so they take a flier on Williams, a former Titan who didn’t play last season. If he provides competition for Thomas and Kelly, he will have done his job. Bridges started 28 games at guard and tackle in Carolina over the past three seasons, but repeated legal troubles led the Panthers to cut the cord. He needs to be on a short leash, but he is good enough to at least provide quality depth.

1 – Jaguars (add QB Todd Bouman) – Bouman, a third-stringer who was let go in Baltimore after the Ravens acquired John Beck, could move up a spot to No. 2 in Jacksonville if he can beat out Cleo Lemon. You don’t want Bouman to start, but he’s a pro who knows the offense and won’t kill you as a short-term fill-in.

1 (con’t) – Cardinals (add OT Oliver Ross and TE Dominique Byrd) – Ross is a 10-year vet who spent the last two seasons on injured reserve after a decent career in Dallas and Arizona. At this point, he’s probably a long shot to contribute, but why not take a shot if you’re the Cardinals? Byrd is a former Rams prospect who didn’t play last year but could figure into a muddle tight-end situation for the Cards.

1 (con’t) – Giants (add G Tutan Reyes and TE George Wrighster) – Reyes is a huge guard who has been around since 2000. He started three games in Jacksonville last year, but he’s probably better off as a backup who provides veteran wile and can fill in in a pinch. Wrighster is another former Jaguar who has 94 career catches but is more of a backup who will fall in line behind Kevin Boss in New York.

1 (con’t) – Jets (keep TE Bubba Franks) – Franks, a former first-round pick, was an adequate blocker with the Jets last year. He should be a solid complement to receiving threat Dustin Keller once again.

1 (con’t) – Panthers (add OG Justin Geisinger) – Geisinger was a reserve for the Redskins last year, but he could find a roster spot in Carolina. The Panthers have lost their top three OL backups this offseason, and they showed last offseason a strategy bring in low-cost vets and let them compete for jobs. Geisinger at least provides such competition. He’s also the first free-agent addition of the offseason for the cap-strapped Panthers.

1 (con’t) – Rams (add WR Tim Carter) – Carter once showed potential with the Giants, but injuries kept him from making an impact. New Rams coach Steve Spagnuolo must have seen enough to remember Carter and give him another shot. Unfortunately for Carter, it’s a long shot.

1 (con’t) – Texans (add LB Boomer Grigsby) – Grigsby is an undersized ‘backer who can play inside and on special teams.

Leave a comment

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency

FR: Cutbacks update

As the league year ended, we compiled a list comparing the cuts teams made  in this post. But in the time that’s followed, there have been several more high-profile cuts that we need to address. So we’ve started a new relativity poll to address the cuts between Feb. 27 and the beginning of the draft. 10 is the most impactful cut; 1 is a cut that just doesn’t matter. (Note: After the release of Torry Holt, the Rams replaced the Cowboys on the top rung of this comparison.)

10 – Rams (cut OT Orlando Pace, WR Torry Holt, and TE Anthony Becht) – Pace played 12 years with the Rams, and was at a high level for most of those. He made 7 Pro Bowls and was a top 5 left tackle for quite a while. (I always considered him behind Walter Jones and Jonathan Ogden but on par with anyone else in the league.) But Pace was hurt much of ’06 and ’07, and he wasn’t the same player when he came back last year. The Rams don’t yet have an adequate replacement, but they figure to take one at No. 2 overall in the draft next month. As for Pace, at this point he’s a marginal starter who would probably fit best as a veteran backup for a contender than as a starter somewhere. He’s also big enough to move to the right side if he’s willing to do so. Becht started 11 games last year but has never lived up to his hype as a first-round pick back in 2000.
Holt spent 10 years in St. Louis and played at a high level throughout. He’s made 7 Pro Bowls and compiled numbers that will put him on a Hall of Fame short list when his career is done. While he’s no longer the unstoppable force he was in the Greatest Show on Turf days, he still is an above-average receiver who would be a boon to a contender like Tennessee, Philadelphia, the Giants, or his hometown Panthers (if they ever clear adequate cap space). I’d take Holt over Marvin Harrison in a heartbeat. As for the Rams, they’ve now lost two of the stalwarts of their Super Bowl teams in Holt and Pace. That has to be a huge blow to their fans, who must now hope that these moves will expedite the rebuilding process. The Pace move might, but losing Holt isn’t worth saving what was a fair price ($8M) against the cap.

9- Cowboys (cut WR Terrell Owens, S Roy Williams) — Owens’ release has been huge news this week because he is still one of the best known players in the entire league. He’s a true No. 1 receiver, even though his dominance is starting to wane just a bit. (He’s behind Larry Fitzgerald, Steve Smith, Andre Johnson, Randy Moss, Calvin Johnson, and maybe a couple of others on the wide receiver hierarchy now.) But the idea that Roy Williams (receiver edition) can replace what Owens did is farfetched. The Cowboys will undoubtedly miss Owens’ talents. But few players in the last decade have made the waves Owens has, and that’s something the Cowboys won’t miss. The question is whether the absence of T.O.-related hullaballoo will help Dallas in the end. The Cowboys still have weapons, and they have the talent and the offensive line personnel to be a dominant running team. That’s the approach that will make this cut work. If the Cowboys try to fling the ball around as much as they did last year, the offense will start to sputter because of T.O.’s absence.
As for Roy Williams (the safety edition), that move doesn’t hurt nearly as much. Williams was a top-10 draft pick, but he is a safety who plays the run really well and plays the pass unbelievably poorly. Ever since the Cowboys moved to a 3-4 scheme under Bill Parcells several years ago, Williams has been a bad fit for the defense. So moving on is better for him and for the Cowboys. Dallas still needs safety help, but Williams’ tenure had gone so far south that he was never going to be able to provide it there.

8 – Giants (cut WR Plaxico Burress) –  Burress delivered on his big salary with the Giants until last year, when he was suspended for chronic disregard for team meetings and then shut down following his hyper-publicized gun incident. He can still play at a high level, but his problems make his ‘09 availability a question. Still, some team will take a flier – for 2010 if not next season.

7 – Redskins (cut DE Jason Taylor) – Taylor battled injuries and only had 3.5 sacks in his year in Washington, and he agreed to be released instead of staying in D.C. in the offseason for the team’s training program. The best analysis I’ve heard on this is that it might have been because he was so misused by the Redskins. For some reason, the Redskins left Andre Carter in the prime pass-rushing position and used Taylor more as a run-stopper. Taylor can still help a team in a pass-rush role, especially if he can save his dancing legs for somewhat limited duty. Washington wasn’t going to use him correctly, but someone will figure out how to.

6 – Panthers (cut CB Ken Lucas) – Lucas was a solid starter in Carolina for four years after arriving as a big-ticket free agent from Seattle. In fact, in his first year as a Panther, Lucas was a top-5 corner league-wide. His physical style fit well in Carolina’s off coverage system. But Lucas has slipped a bit over the past couple of years, and Carolina was ready to move Richard Marshall into the starting lineup across from Chris Gamble. Lucas is still good enough to be at least a starter somewhere else, but given the Panthers’ roster and ultra-tight salary cap situation, the move makes sense. Still, it’s going to be a loss for the Panthers.

6 (con’t) – Ravens (cut CB Samari Rolle and LB Nick Griesen) – Rolle had been with the Ravens for four years, and when he started in Baltimore he was still among the elite corners in the league. But last year was not a good one for Samari (or Doorknob, as I still like to call him). He missed six games because of injury and never was able to get healthy enough to play at an elite level. He wasn’t going to start for Baltimore, so he requested his release. The Ravens also cut Rolle’s fellow starting CB Chris McAlister, and so their secondary is in major upheaval. Baltimore has signed Dominique Foxworth, who will definitely start even though he’s probably not even above average as an NFL starter. The other starting spot goes to Fabian Washington, at least for now. The Ravens tried to do right by Rolle by letting him go as he wanted, but they might have done wrong by themselves in the process. Griesen signed a 3-year deal last year to be an inside linebacker and special-teamer, but he never could make an impact in the defensive 11 last year. He could be a decent backup for someone but not much more.

5 – Jaguars (cut WR Matt Jones) – Jones, a former college quarterback turned first-round pick at receiver, is coming off his best season (65 catches, 761 yards, 2 TD) of four in Jacksonville. But off-the-field problems led to his release. Jones missed three games last year on a league-mandated substance-abuse suspension after a cocaine-related arrest last summer. But recently, he spent a week in jail for violating the plea agreement that resolved that charge by drinking alcohol. It seems that Jones was given an ultimatim and didn’t abide by it. It’s a loss for the Jaguars, who have also cut WR Jerry Porter and let former first-rounder Reggie Williams enter free agency as well. They need to find some wide receiver help and may be hoping that Michael Crabtree falls to them at No. 8 overall in the draft.

5 (con’t) – Dolphins (cut DE Vonnie Holliday) – Holliday is a long-time veteran defensive end who is still an acceptable part of a rotation. But he’s no longer an impact starter, and his Dolphins contract paid him as one. Holliday would actually be a pretty good fit as Taylor’s replacement in Washington or in a similar role where he’s looked at more as a run-stuffer than a pass rusher.

5 (con’t) – Saints (cut FB Mike Karney, CB Mike McKenzie and S Kevin Kaesviharn) – Karney is a good, old-fashioned fullback. He’s not much of a runner outside of short-yardage sets, and he doesn’t catch many passes, but he can block. The Saints replaced him with Heath Evans, who has more skills with the ball in his hands. But Karney has a place as a blocker somewhere. (That somewhere will be St. Louis.) McKenzie used to be a big, physical corner, but he has missed most of the last two years with two separate knee injuries. It makes sense for the Saints to release him and save $4.5 million, especially once they added CB Jabari Greer. McKenzie might have trouble finding work because of his physical situation, but he’s worth noting because his 11-year career was quality. Kaesviharn was let go after the Saints signed safeties Darren Sharper and Pierson Prioleau. He’s an average safety, or maybe a little below that level, and so no great loss. Still, he could hook on elsewhere.

4 – Browns (cut OT Kevin Shaffer) – Shaffer started all but one game over the past three years, playing one season at left tackle before moving to the right side after Cleveland drafted Joe Thomas. He’s probably still good enough to start, and his ability to play both sides makes him even more valuable. He should be able to find a new gig relatively quickly.

4 (con’t) – 49ers (cut OT Jonas Jennings) – Jennings was a big-money signing in San Francisco a couple of years back, but injuries kept him from full effectiveness in San Francisco. He was released to make room for Marvel Smith, who will likely take over Jennings’ ORT spot.

3 –  Bears (cut OL Terrance Metcalf) – Metcalf spent 7 years with the Bears after joining the team as a third-round pick, but he never panned out as a starter – getting just 25 starts during his Chicago tenure. Metcalf should have seized a starting guard last year to replace Ruben Brown, but he couldn’t. That’s why he’s gone. He could fit in as a backup elsewhere, but if he doesn’t, it wouldn’t be a shock.

2 –  Broncos (cut LS Mike Leach, RB Cory Boyd, and QB Darrell Hackney) – Good long snappers can work forever, and so Leach won’t have trouble getting a new gig. The Broncos decided he was expendable after new head coach Josh McDaniels imported his former New England snapper Lonnie Paxton and paid him a million bucks a year. Leach won’t get that kind of coin (no longer snapper should), but he’ll find work somewhere. (That somewhere will be Arizona.)

2 (con’t) – Bengals (cut S Dexter Jackson) – Cincy let Jackson, a former Super Bowl Most Valuable Player, go after three seasons. Jackson had started 25 total games for the Bengals in 2006 and ’07 but only three last season. Jackson might be close to being done, but he could also be a solid veteran reserve for a team with playoff aspirations — kind of a “break glass in case of emergency” guy.

2 (con’t) – Browns (cut WR Joe Jurevicius) – Jurevicius has had some productive seasons over his 11-year career, but a staph infection cost him the entire ’08 season. If he can get healthy, he could still step in somewhere as a No. 4 receiver and possession specialist. But health is still a huge question.

2 (con’t) – Steelers (cut RB Gary Russell) – Russell got to play in some short-yardage situations last year because rookie Rashard Mendenhall was hurt, and Russell scored three regular-season touchdowns and one in the Super Bowl, but he didn’t really distinguish himself. He could fit in as a third or fourth tailback for someone, but he’s not really a rotation-quality runner.

1- Chiefs (cut QB Quinn Gray, WR Will Franklin, and LS Jean-Phillippe Darche) – The six-year vet still could be a decent No. 2 quarterback, but with Matt Cassel joining Tyler Thigpen and Brodie Croyle in K.C., Gray wasn’t going to make that roster. But with many other talented quarterbacks still on the market (J.P. Losman, Rex Grossman, Kyle Boller, Byron Leftwich, etc.), Gray will have a hard time finding work anytime soon.

1 (con’t) – Colts (cut RB Clifton Dawson) – Dawson had a moment or two, but a numbers crunch knocked him out of Indy. He could be a backup elsewhere.

1 (con’t) – Vikings (cut LB Vinny Ciurciu) – This move made me laugh because it reminded me of a story. Ciurciu is a decent backup linebacker and special teamer who got his first real NFL action in Carolina when I was covering the team. The writers on the beat with me always laughed about an interview in which one of Ciurciu’s teammates was talking about him and kept calling him “Choo-Choo” (instead of the proper Chur-choo). So I hope that Choo-Choo gets another job, because a name that good needs to stick around.

9 Comments

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency