Tag Archives: NFL transactions

Week 6 Transactions

Each week, we note and comment on the NFL’s biggest transactions. Here are the transactions between the end of Week 6 and the beginning of Week 7. Note that we covered the Brandon Lloyd trade in this post and Carson Palmer in this one.

Steelers DE Aaron Smith, via postgazette.com

Saints (put C Olin Kreutz on reserve/left squad list) – Kreutz apparently lost his shine and his desire to play in New Orleans – and was about to lose his starting job as well after poor play this season. So Kreutz left the team, ostensibly to retire. He’s now out for the year.

Steelers (put DE Aaron Smith on injured reserve, promote DE Corbin Bryant) – Smith, long one of the league’s best 3-4 defensive ends, battled injuries again this season and now will miss the rest of the season.

Lions (put RB Jerome Harrison on reserve/non-football injury list) – Harrison, who was traded to the Eagles, flunked his physical in Philly because of a brain tumor he didn’t know he had. He had successful surgery, but he’ll miss the rest of the year. The Lions signed Eldra Buckley to replace Harrison.

Raiders (add S Chinedum Ndukwe and PK Dave Rayner, put DE Matt Shaughnessy on injured reserve) – Shaughnessy, one of the league’s unsung but talented defensive ends, will miss the rest of the season. Ndukwe gets a shot to add depth at safety; Rayner becomes a Week 7 fill-in for Sebastian Janikowski.

Jaguars (sign WR Mike Sims-Walker) – Sims-Walker was a bust in St. Louis, and he was released when the Rams acquired Brandon Lloyd. But when he hit the open market, the Jaguars swooped in and brought him back to Jacksonville, where he was a starter for years.

Panthers (put OT Jeff Otah on injured reserve, bring back OT Reggie Wells) – We discussed Otah’s injury and its aftereffects in this post.

Redskins (put OG Kory Lichtensteiger on injured reserve) – Lichtensteiger, the starter at left guard, will miss the rest of the season.

Seahawks (put CB Marcus Trufant on injured reserve) – Trufant, the long-time corner in Seattle, is out for the year due to injury.

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FR: 2011 In-season trades

Brandon Lloyd

New Rams WR Brandon Lloyd. Image by Jeffrey Beall via Flickr

Each year, we compare the significance of in-season trades in a Football Relativity post. In this comparison, the 10 level marks the most significant trades, and the 1 level the least significant. This post compares all trades through the Oct. 18 trade deadline.

10 – Bengals trade QB Carson Palmer to Raiders for first-round pick in 2012 and second-round pick in 2013 that can become first-rounder – Palmer had not played in 2011 after he told the Bengals he wanted to be traded. Notoriously stubborn Bengals owner/GM Mike Brown called Palmer’s bluff, letting him sit out without much hope of a silver (or even silver and black) lining. In the meantime, Cincinnati drafted QB Andy Dalton and made him their starter. Dalton got off to a good start as the Bengals opened 4-2, and that might have softened Brown a little. Then the Raiders – who lost QB Jason Campbell to a broken collarbone that’s at least a six-week injury – made a move for Palmer and paid a huge price to add him. The Bengals, who had once turned down two first-rounders for WR Chad Ochocinco, this time made the deal. They get Oakland’s first-rounder next season and a second-rounder in 2013 that can become a first-rounder if the Raiders make the AFC Championship game in either of the next two years. The Raiders, who now lack picks in each of the first four rounds of the 2012 draft, believe Palmer still has the big arm to maximize their young, talented group of wideouts. Head coach Hue Jackson, who coached Palmer during some of his best Bengals years, runs an offense that Palmer knows, which should aid the adjustment period. And Palmer has been working out as well. It’s a risky move for the Raiders, but Palmer does give them more upside than Campbell ever did. The question is whether Palmer can adjust to the silver and black quickly enough to lead the 4-2 Raiders to the playoffs. The price is incredibly steep, but the Raiders are so desperate to win that “just win, baby” is trumping long-term thinking right now.

9 – none

8 – none

7 – none

6 – Broncos trade WR Brandon Lloyd to Rams for 2012 sixth-round pick that could become a fifth-round pick – The Broncos, clearly in a rebuilding mode, dealt their leading receiver Lloyd to the Rams. With Denver moving to Tim Tebow as their starting quarterback, it makes sense to have him work with the receivers who will be around beyond 2011, such as Eric Decker and Demaryius Thomas, who is returning from injury to make his 2011 debut. Since Lloyd is a free-agent-to-be, he became expendable. But Denver didn’t get a great price – just a sixth-round pick that becomes a fifth-rounder if Lloyd catches 30 passes for the Rams. But the deal at least opens opportunities for Thomas, which is a legitimate developmental move for Denver. The Rams, who gambled and lost on a one-year deal for Mike Sims-Walker to be their No. 1 receiver this year, get Lloyd, who thrived under offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels in Denver. (Sims-Walker was released to clear a spot for Lloyd.) Since McDaniels is the only coach to unlock Lloyd’s potential over nine years with four teams, Lloyd couldn’t have found a better landing spot. He’s immediately the best receiver the Rams have, and he has the chance to finish the season strongly to earn a new contract, be it in St. Louis or elsewhere. The Rams are 0-5, so this isn’t a move for the playoffs, but it does allow QB Sam Bradford to keep developing and should help the offense move from awful closer to average. If Lloyd fits as the situation suggests, expect the Rams to extend his deal, to make the most of the draft pick they spent to get him.

5 – none

4 – Seahawks trade OLB Aaron Curry to Raiders for 2012 seventh-round pick and conditional 2013 fifth-round pick – We discussed Curry’s ups and downs in this post, which focused on trade rumors about him. Seattle finally gave up on Curry, the former fourth overall pick in the draft, even though their linebacker corps has been wracked by injuries. With Curry gone, rookie K.D. Williams emerges as a starter in Seattle. In Oakland, Curry provides some flexibility at linebacker and allows Kamerion Wimbley to move up to defensive end in pass-rushing situations. Curry is the kind of first-round disappointment that Al Davis loved to take a chance on. Given the price, you can’t blame the Raiders for taking a shot on Curry to see if they can unlock his potential in a way Seattle could not. The fact that Curry started his first game as a Raider only shows the potential impact of this deal.

3 – Eagles trade RB Ronnie Brown to Lions for RB Jerome Harrison and conditional seventh-round pick in 2013 – With Jahvid Best battling concussion issues and rookie Mikel Leshoure sidelined for the year, the Lions added insurance in Brown. The longtime Dolphin had a slow start for the Eagles, running just 13 times for 38 yards and turning the ball over on one key Wildcat-type of play. Brown isn’t what he once was, but he’s sturdy and dependable enough to fill a lineup spot and protect QB Matthew Stafford if Best misses time. The Eagles basically gave Brown away, getting only a conditional seventh-rounder as well as Harrison, whom they traded for last season and then let leave in the offseason without a second thought. This trade was voided when Harrison failed a physical with the Eagles.

2 – none

1 – Jets trade WR Derrick Mason to Texans for conditional seventh-round pick – Mason was supposed to come to the Jets to be the dependable third receiver, replacing the departed Jerricho Cotchery. But instead of living up to his two-year contract, Mason had just 13 catches for 115 yards for the Jets. More importantly, the Jets coaching staff and front office identified Mason as a troublemaker in the locker room. That had never been Mason’s reputation before, but things quickly devolved to the point that the Jets basically gave Mason away. In his place, the Jets will go to rookie Jeremy Kerley as their third receiver. The Texans, who are without Andre Johnson at the moment, and Mason provides stability and reliability than guys like David Anderson (who was again released) or the inconsistent Jacoby Jones. Now, with Mason and Kevin Walter, the Texans can at least give QB Matt Schaub some options. And if Mason ends up with less than 33 catches as a Texan, Houston won’t owe the Jets a pick. If he does have that many catches, he’ll be well worth a seventh-rounder. The price was right for Houston, and Mason is likely thrilled to escape a situation where he wasn’t wanted.

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Week 5 Transactions

San Francisco 49ers wide receiver Josh Morgan ...

49ers WR Josh Morgan went on IR. Image via Wikipedia

Each week, we note and comment on the NFL’s biggest transactions. Here are the transactions between the end of Week 5 and the beginning of Week 6. Note that we covered two trades in this post.

Texans (put OLB Mario Williams on IR) – Williams, the Texans’ best pass rusher, suffered a torn pectoral muscle in Week 5. He’ll miss the rest of the season, which is a huge blow to the Texans.

Chargers (put ILB Stephen Cooper on IR, add LB Gerald Hayes) – San Diego put longtime Charger Cooper on injured reserve with a triceps issues that’s been plaguing him since last year and brought in Hayes, an ex-Cardinal, to provide veteran depth.

Browns (put DE Marcus Benard on non-football injury list) – Benard was in a motorcycle accident, and the injuries he sustained will cost him the rest of the season.

49ers (put WR Josh Morgan on IR) – Morgan, a starting wideout for the 49ers, broke his leg in Week 5 against the Buccaneers. He’ll miss the season.

Colts (add DT Dan Muir, cut OT Mike Tepper) – The Colts brought back Muir for defensive line depth and sent Tepper back to the practice squad.

Broncos (put DT Kevin Vickerson on IR, claim FB Quinn Johnson) – Vickerson is out for the year. To take his roster spot, the Broncos claimed Johnson, a burly fullback, on waivers from the Titans.

Cardinals (add S Sean Considine) – Considine, most recently a Panther, moves to Arizona to provide depth and special-teams acumen.

Jaguars (add P Nick Harris, cut P Matt Turk) – Jacksonville made a punter switch, opting for ex-Lion Harris over the 40-something Turk.

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Two trades: Mason to Texans, Curry to Raiders

Derrick Mason

WR Derrick Mason, now of the Titans. Image by Keith Allison via Flickr

The NFL trade market heated up this week with two players changing addresses. Below, we talk about the moves of WR Derrick Mason from the Jets to the Texans and OLB Aaron Curry from the Seahawks to the Raiders. We’ll compare these trades along with any others during the NFL season in a future post.

Jets trade WR Derrick Mason to Texans for conditional seventh-round pick – Mason was supposed to come to the Jets to be the dependable third receiver, replacing the departed Jerricho Cotchery. But instead of living up to his two-year contract, Mason had just 13 catches for 115 yards for the Jets. More importantly, the Jets coaching staff and front office identified Mason as a troublemaker in the locker room. That had never been Mason’s reputation before, but things quickly devolved to the point that the Jets basically gave Mason away. In his place, the Jets will go to rookie Jeremy Kerley as their third receiver. The Texans, who are without Andre Johnson at the moment, and Mason provides stability and reliability than guys like David Anderson (who was again released) or the inconsistent Jacoby Jones. Now, with Mason and Kevin Walter, the Texans can at least give QB Matt Schaub some options. The price was right for Houston, and Mason is likely thrilled to escape a situation where he wasn’t wanted.

Seahawks trade OLB Aaron Curry to Raiders for 2012 seventh-round pick and conditional 2013 fifth-round pick – We discussed Curry’s ups and downs in this post, which focused on trade rumors about him. Seattle finally gave up on Curry, the former fourth overall pick in the draft, even though their linebacker corps has been wracked by injuries. With Curry gone, rookie K.D. Williams emerges as a starter in Seattle. In Oakland, Curry provides some flexibility at linebacker and allows Kamerion Wimbley to move up to defensive end in pass-rushing situations. Curry is the kind of first-round disappointment that Al Davis loved to take a chance on. Given the price, you can’t blame the Raiders for taking a shot on Curry to see if they can unlock his potential in a way Seattle could not.

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Berry benched by injury, and other Week 1 Transactions

No team has had a worse start to the season injury-wise than the Kansas City Chiefs. They lost promising young TE Tony Moeaki in the preseason, and then in Week One they lost another second-year player, S Eric Berry, to a season-ending torn ACL. Berry made the Pro Bowl after a rookie season in which he started every game and had 72 tackles, four interceptions, and 10 passes defensed.

With Berry out, the Chiefs lose one of their major playmakers in the secondary. Now the defense must rely on OLBs Tamba Hali and Justin Houston to create enough havoc to make big plays. That’s going to be tough – which is part of the reason losing Berry is such a huge blow.

Chiefs S Eric Berry, via komu.com

The Chiefs brought back S Reshad Jernigan to fill Berry’s roster spot, and also added veteran blocking TE Anthony Becht to help fill Moeaki’s shoes. Now, let’s review the other transactions between Week 1 and Week 2.

Panthers (put LB Jon Beason on IR; add DT Ronald Fields and OG Reggie Wells) – We discussed Beason’s injury in this post. The Panthers used his roster spot to add needed depth at defensive tackle with Fields, a veteran who can play on the nose. Wells replaces Max-Jean Gilles, released just before the opener, as the veteran depth on the O-line.

Chargers (put PK Nate Kaeding on IR; add PK Nick Novak) – Kaeding suffered a season-ending torn ACL in the opener. He’s replaced by Novak, who has bounced around the league with mixed results.

Steelers (put OT Willie Colon on IR; add OT Jamon Meredith) – Colon, the Steelers’ starting right tackle, will miss the rest of the season with torn triceps. He’s replaced on the roster by Meredith, a former Packers draft pick who has seen some action with the Bills.

Rams (put CB Ron Bartell on IR; add CB Tim Atchison) – Bartell, the Rams’ best cornerback, will be sidelined for the season with broken bones in his neck. That’s a huge loss for a Rams’ defense that is otherwise soft at the position.

Broncos (put DT Ty Warren on IR) – Warren, the long-time Patriot, suffered torn triceps in training camp, but the Broncos hoped to be able to hold a roster spot till he got healthy in November. But with Knowshon Moreno hurting, the Broncos needed the roster spot, and so they shelved Warren for the entire season.

Dolphins (cut CB Benny Sapp; add CB Will Allen) – After Sapp gave up a 99-yard touchdown to New England’s Wes Welker, he was scapegoated and cut. He’s replaced by Allen, a long-time Dolphin who was cut in training camp.

Bills (put WR Marcus Easley on IR; add WR Ruvell Martin) – Buffalo discovered Easley had a heart condition, and so they put him on injured reserve for the season. Martin, a veteran who was with the team in training camp, returns to add depth.

Cowboys (add CB Frank Walker and FB Tony Fiametta; cut WR Laurent Robinson) – Dallas adds depth with Walker, who has bounced around as a veteran corner, and Fiammetta, a blocking fullback who spent the first years of his career with Carolina. Robinson, a speedster with a long injury history, was released.

Texans (add WR David Anderson) – With Kevin Walter hurting, the Texans brought back Anderson to add depth at wide receiver.

Giants (add WR Brandon Stokely) – The Giants brought the veteran Stokley in to fill a hole at the slot receiver position. He’s a veteran who will help the passing game thrive.

Browns (put P Richmond McGee on IR; add P Brad Maynard) – McGee, who the Browns hoped would replace the injured Reggie Hodges, suffered a bad disc in his back and will be out for the season. Maynard, a veteran most recently with the Bears, takes over.

Bengals (add TE Donald Lee) – Lee is a solid blocker with some receiving skills who fills the role the Bengals had signed Bo Scaife for.

49ers (add TE Justin Peelle) – Peelle, a blocking specialist, adds depth behind Vernon Davis.

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Dawg Day: Seymour stays, Stroud goes

Marcus Stroud (99) and Richard Seymour (93) pose with fellow Georgia alum Hines Ward, via cunninghamsports.com

Among the continuing franchise player moves this week, Wednesday was a Dawg day as ex-University of Georgia teammates Richard Seymour and Marcus Stroud both hit the transactions wire. Seymour (the sixth overall pick in 2001)  re-signed with the Raiders, while Stroud (the 13th overall pick that same year) was released by the Bills. Below are thoughts on both transactions.

Seymour, whom the Raiders gave up this year’s first-round pick for two years ago, helped to stabilize the Raiders’ defense and was a key to Oakland’s rebound season this year. After franchising Seymour last year, the Raiders worked a two-year deal worth up to $30 million with $22.5 million guaranteed. In other words, they’re paying him basically two years’ worth of franchise tags while saving the tag for another player (likely TE Zach Miller). Seymour, meanwhile, gets a contract potential worth more per season than Julius Peppers, the highest paid defensive end, makes. Seymour is still playing at a high level, and his 2010 Pro Bowl nod (his sixth) was well deserved. At age 31, Seymour isn’t over the hill, although his prime certainly is waning. Still, Seymour has the chance to turn his trade to Oakland into a nice second act to his career after eight great seasons in New England, and by keeping Seymour, the Raiders make their first-round investment more worthwhile. As the Raiders try to build a defense that’s sneaky good in the front seven, this is a positive move despite the high price tag.

Stroud, meanwhile, has not paid off for the Bills since they traded third- and fifth-round picks for him two seasons ago. Stroud had a strong 2009 season and parlayed it into a contract extension, but his 2010 performance tailed off, to the point that Pro Bowler Kyle Williams and (as pointed out by BuffLowDown.com) Alex Carrington are more valuable at defensive tackle. Stroud, who turns 32 this offseason, isn’t the player he was during his Pro Bowl tenure in Jacksonville, but he’s young enough to become at least a solid nose tackle elsewhere. Often, defensive tackles see massive fluctuations in their performance as they age, and from year to year they can look finished and then revitatlized. Stroud must now hope that is his path, but the Bills aren’t willing to gamble that it is.

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Haynesworth suspended, plus other Week 14 transactions

Each week we share insights, analysis, and opinions of the week’s transactions. To see previous posts, click this link and start working back.

The big move of the week was the Redskins’ suspension of DT Albert Haynesworth. Haynesworth famously signed a contract potentially worth $100 million before the 2009 season and cashed a $21 million bonus check before this season before clashing with head coach Mike Shanahan over playing in a 3-4 defense instead of his preferred 4-3. The situation festered throughout the season, with Haynesworth’s conditioning, commitment, and preparation constantly questioned as he played in eight of the first 12 games with just 2.5 sacks. In moments, like the Chicago game, Haynesworth was dominant, but he was largely an afterthought. Finally, the Redskins had enough and suspended Haynesworth for the last four games of the season. We don’t absolve Shanahan in this situation, but Haynesworth’s petulence certainly led to an embarrassing end to his Redskins season, both for him and the team.

(And you can compare the Haynesworth suspension to others during the 2010 season in this post.)

In other moves…

Cowboys (put WR Dez Bryant on IR) – Bryant has had a standout rookie season, with six receiving TDs and two more scores on punt returns, but a knee injury sidelines him after 12 games.

Colts (put CB Jerraud Powers and S Bob Sanders on IR; add RB Dominic Rhodes) – The Colts’ injury problems in the secondary continued as they gave up the ghost on 2010 contributions from Sanders, who is trying to return from a biceps injury, and Powers was knocked out for the season as well. They brought back stalwart Rhodes, who played in the UFL this season, to help fill in for equally prolific RB injuries.

Buccaneers (put CB Aqib Talib and C Jeff Faine on IR; add C Donovan Raiola) – The Buccaneers lost two key contributors in Talib, who was emerging as one of the league’s best corners, and Faine, a quality pivot. Both are major losses as the Bucs push for the playoffs. They brought in Raiola, who has been with six NFL teams but has yet to play in an NFL game.

Saints (add LB Kawika Mitchell) – Mitchell, an eight-year veteran who has not played in 2010, joins the Saints to provide a late-season infusion. If he’s healthy, Mitchell is good enough to be an acceptable starter.

Lions (add OT Tony Ugoh) – Ugoh, who was once a starter for the Colts, joined the Lions. The former second-round pick has started 24 NFL games.

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