Tag Archives: NFL Suspensions

Vengeance against Vincent

San Diego WR Vincent Jackson became the latest big-time player to incur a league suspension, as he received a three-game ban to open the 2010 season for violating the league’s personal conduct policy. Below are some thoughts on the suspension; you can see how it compares to other suspensions this offseason in this post.

Jackson, who made his first Pro Bowl last season, has emerged as a No. 1 receiver for the Bolts over the past couple of years. The former second-round pick out of Northern Colorado has become Philip Rivers’ No. 1 option, and he had a career-high 68 catches for 1,167 yards in 2009. But even as his role has increased, Jackson has kept his big-play potential, and his whopping 17.2 yards per catch average in 2009 actually matched his career number. But Jackson has also had two DUI convictions, and his guilty plea in February in the second case is what opened the door to league discipline. He’ll miss three games, which is a big blow to the Chargers, who don’t have another receiver nearly as accomplished as VJax. But it may not be as big of a deal to Jackson, a restricted free agent who has refused to sign his tender and has threatened to hold out through the 10th game of the season. Now a holdout may actually seem more palatable, since he’ll already miss three game checks whether he signs or not. This wasn’t the NFL’s intent, but since he can serve his suspension while holding out, the league might have actually motivated Jackson to stay out of Charger land a little longer.

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Whiteout in Seattle

The big NFL news over Memorial Day weekend was the Seahawks’ decision to give up on RB LenDale White after just 35 days in the offseason. Below are some thoughts on White’s situations, which includes a suspension, and the Seahawks’ RB situation as it stands now.

White had two good years out of four in Tennessee, but the Titans tired of his weight problems and attitude issues and dealt him to Seattle during the draft to move up a few spots in the fourth and sixth rounds. That light price in itself was a sign, but it appeared that White would be able to live up to his potential with his former college coach Pete Carroll. But when White was flagged for violating the league’s substance-abuse policy, which will shelve him for the first four games of the season, the Seahawks decided White wasn’t worth the hassle and released him. White has talent, but if Carroll, under whom White thrived at USC, doesn’t see White as worth a roster spot, then it’s possible that no one else will either. White now faces a huge crossroads, and if he doesn’t dedicate himself to performing on the field, he could end up in the UFL instead of the NFL this fall.

The Seahawks, meanwhile, still have a tenuous RB situation. Justin Forsett returns after showing flashes of promise last year, and trade acquisition Leon Washington will help a ton if he is healthy after last season’s knee injury. Julius Jones also returns, although he has shown little explosiveness since early in his career in Dallas. Ex-Redskin Quinton Ganther could help as well. But this quantity doesn’t reveal quality, unless Washington returns fully to form or Forsett takes a leap forward.

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FR: 2010 suspensions

In this post, we compare the significance of the NFL suspensions that will play out as the regular season begins. The 10 level denotes the most significant league-issued suspensions, while the 1 level marks the least damaging. We’ll continue to update this post as more suspensions (perhaps including Minnesota’s Williams Wall) are announced.

10 – QB Ben Roethlisberger, Steelers (4-6 games for violating league’s personal conduct policy) – One of the biggest stories of the offseason was Roethlisberger’s fall from grace following a second accusation of sexual impropriety. While Roethlisberger dodged prosecution in the Georgia case this year, just as he did in Nevada last year, his image was tarnished to the point that commissioner Roger Goodell levied a six-game suspension on the two-time Super Bowl winning QB. Roethlisberger becomes the best known and most important player to be benched by Goodell for tarnishing the NFL’s shield, and his absence (whether it stays at six games or is shortened to four) will severely inhibit the Steelers’ chances for a good start. In Big Ben’s absence, the Steelers will turn to second-year player Dennis Dixon or veterans Charlie Batch or Byron Leftwich. None are good options for a multiple-game scenario.

9 – OLB Brian Cushing, Texans (4 games for violating league’s performance-enhancing substance policy) – Cushing, the defending defensive rookie of the year, was flagged for four games for a performance-enhancing substance. He denies using steroids, as so many who are flagged for this offense do, and the fact that rumors about Cushing date back to high school make his denials seems hollow. But while this seems like a big deal, it won’t cling to his career over the long term. After all, who remembers that Julius Peppers got a similar suspension in a similarly fine rookie season? How many of us count Shawne Merriman among this offense’s alumni? It’s a shame that Cushing tested positive, because it does taint his fine rookie season. But our hunch is that five years from now, play and not positive tests will be what we think of when we consider Cushing. For the Texans, meanwhile, losing perhaps their most impactful defensive player is a blow. Houston finally broke the .500 barrier for the first time last season, and the offseason was designed to take the next step and make the playoffs. But without Cushing, impact defensive plays will have to come from DeMeco Ryans and Mario Williams. Cushing’s versatility will be missed, and four games – including Houston’s home shot against the Colts – are more than enough to impede a playoff run before it even begins.

9 (con’t) – WR Vincent Jackson, Chargers (3 games for violating league’s substance-abuse policy) – Jackson, who made his first Pro Bowl last season, has emerged as a No. 1 receiver for the Bolts over the past couple of years. The former second-round pick out of Northern Colorado has become Philip Rivers’ No. 1 option, and he had a career-high 68 catches for 1,167 yards in 2009. But even as his role has increased, Jackson has kept his big-play potential, and his whopping 17.2 yards per catch average in 2009 actually matched his career number. But Jackson has also had two DUI convictions, and his guilty plea in February in the second case is what opened the door to league discipline. He’ll miss three games, which is a big blow to the Chargers, who don’t have another receiver nearly as accomplished as VJax. But it may not be as big of a deal to Jackson, a restricted free agent who has refused to sign his tender and has threatened to hold out through the 10th game of the season. Now a holdout may actually seem more palatable, since he’ll already miss three game checks whether he signs or not. This wasn’t the NFL’s intent, but since he can serve his suspension while holding out, the league might have actually motivated Jackson to stay out of Charger land a little longer.

8 – DE Johnny Jolly, Packers (at least a full season for violating league’s substance-abuse policy) – Jolly, who started as a defensive end and thrived as the Packers moved to a 3-4 defense last year, was suspended for at least the 2010 season by the league for violating the substance-abuse policy. Jolly is also engaged in a codeine-possession case in Texas. Jolly, a four-year veteran, emerged as a starter after being a sixth-round pick, and his size and sturdiness against the run made him a great fit for the Packers’ new scheme. But now, facing a suspension that indicates at least two positive tests, he’ll have to convince league officials to let him return to the NFL when he is first eligible to apply for reinstatement after the season. Reinstatement is not a guarantee, and that means Jolly is facing a steep uphill climb to make it back into the league. It’s a blow for the Packers to lose a starter in this manner, but with second-year man B.J. Raji and rookie Mike Neal added in the last two drafts to join Cullen Jenkins as 3-4 ends, there’s at least some depth at the position in Green Bay.

7 – WR Santonio Holmes, Jets (4 games for violating league’s substance-abuse policy) – Holmes was flagged by the league for a violation of the league’s substance-abuse policy, and that no doubt had something to do with his trade from Pittsburgh to the Jets. On the field, Holmes is emerging into a legitimate No. 1 receiver, but the problems he’s had off the field could curb his potential. Now Holmes will have to prove his worth to the Jets in just 12 games and earn a new contract as he enters the last year of his deal four games late.

6 – none

5 – RB LenDale White, Broncos  (4 games for violating league’s substance-abuse policy) – White had two good years out of four in Tennessee, but the Titans tired of his weight problems and attitude issues and dealt him to Seattle during the draft to move up a few spots in the fourth and sixth rounds. That light price in itself was a sign, but it appeared that White would be able to live up to his potential with his former college coach Pete Carroll. But when White was flagged for violating the league’s substance-abuse policy, which will shelve him for the first four games of the season, the Seahawks decided White wasn’t worth the hassle and released him. White has talent, but if Carroll, under whom White thrived at USC, doesn’t see White as worth a roster spot, then it’s possible that no one else will either. White now faces a huge crossroads, and if he doesn’t dedicate himself to performing on the field, he may not make the team in Denver, where he signed late in training camp.

4 – NT Jason Ferugson, Dolphins (8 games for a second violation of league’s performance-enhancing substance policy) – The Dolphins re-signed Ferguson for 2010 even though he’ll miss the first half of the season for his second violation of the performance-enhancing substance policy. (The first happened in 1999.) Ferguson, who’s also seeking to recover from a November knee injury, decided in July that he would retire rather than face rehab plus a suspension.

4 (con’t) – OLB Gerald McRath, Titans (4 games for violating the league’s performance-enhancing substance policy) – McRath emerged as a starter by the end of his rookie season, and the fourth-round draft pick had at least six tackles in each of the last three games. He had a shot to beat out David Thornton to become the starting strong-side ‘backer, but this suspension likely means the Titans will hold onto Thornton for one more year. This suspension is a blow for a Titans defense that is looking to get younger and more athletic.

4 (con’t) – OLB Leroy Hill, Seahawks (1 game for violating league’s substance-abuse policy) – Hill, a starter for the Seahawks who signed a $6 million-plus one-year contract earlier this offseason, now faces a one-game suspension for violating the league’s substance-abuse policy following a misdemeanor drug possession guilty plea. Hill’s absence could spell doom for him under a new coaching regime in Seattle under Pete Carroll, especially with David Hawthorne and Aaron Curry showing promise last year. Hill has been a good but not great player for the Seahawks, and with him facing further potential discipline stemming from a pending domestic-violence case, his future in Seattle is starting to look as cloudy as the Seattle sky usually does.

4 (con’t) – DT Jonathan Babineaux, Falcons (1 game for violating league’s substance-abuse policy) – Babineaux drew a one-game suspension from the league following a marijuana possession arrest. Losing him for one game hurts, because he’s started every game for the last two years and been a penetrating presence. He had six sacks last year, which is a lot for a defensive tackle. Babineaux will return in Week Two, but his absence will hurt Atlanta quite a bit in its opener at Pittsburgh.

4 (con’t) – CB Aqib Talib, Buccaneers (1 game for violating league’s personal-conduct policy) – Talib, who started 15 games in his sophomore season last year, will sit one game as punishment for an incidient in which he punched a cab driver. The former first-round pick has promise, but off-field questions continue to circle and tarnish his potential.

3 – OL Quinn Ojinnaka, Patriots (1 game for violating league’s personal conduct policy) – Ojinnaka drew a one-game suspension after a 2009 arrest for simple battery against his wife that apparently was resolved. Ojinnaka started five games last year, and New England traded for him during the preseason to help with depth at its injury-plagued guard position.

3 (con’t) – DT Hollis Thomas (8 games for a second violation of league’s performance-enhancing substance policy) – Thomas, who played for the Panthers last season, had a previous violation of the performance-enhancing-substance policy in 2006, which is why his current suspension is eight games. It may be academic, because Thomas, a 13-year veteran, hasn’t signed anywhere yet . But he may still be good enough to at least be a part-time run-stopping tackle who could have been a late addition for someone were this suspension not looming.

3 (con’t) – TE Shawn Nelson, Bills (4 games for violating the league’s substance-abuse policy) – Nelson had 17 catches as a rookie last season, as he started 12 games for the Bills. Now he will miss the first four games of the season after violating the league’s substance-abuse policy. That’s a blow for a Bills offense that needs playmakers wherever it can find them.

2 – FB Luke Lawton, Raiders (2 games for violating league’s performance-enhancing substance policy) – Lawton has two games remaining on his suspension for violating the league’s performance-enhancing substance policy last year. He has just five carries in five years but sees regular action in two-back sets. However, Oakland’s signing of Rock Cartwright could fill Lawton’s spot not just for the first two games but more permanently.

2 (con’t) – WR Ed Gant, Cardinals (4 games for violating league’s performance-enhancing substance policy) – Gant, who spent his first pro season on Arizona’s practice squad, got flagged for violating the league’s performance-enhancer policy. The suspension makes Gant’s road to a roster spot almost insurmountable.

2 (con’t) – LB Robert James, Falcons (4 games for violating league’s performance-enhancing substance policy) – James, a 2008 fifth-round draft pick who spent the last two seasons on injured reserve, will miss four games for violating the leagues’ performance-enhancer policy. That makes his uphill road to a roster spot even steeper.

2 (con’t) – CB Cary Williams, Ravens (2 games for violating league’s personal-conduct policy) – The Ravens claimed Williams off waivers late last season, and he has a chance to make the team as a backup defensive back and special-teamer this season. But a two-game suspension for violating the league’s personal-conduct policy hurts his chances to make the team. The Ravens knew of this issue when they claimed Williams, but it’s uncertain whether they’ll stick with Williams through this suspension.

1 – OT Ryan Tucker (8 games for a second violation of league’s performance-enhancing substance policy) – Tucker, most recently a Brown, was flagged eight games for his second performance-enhancing substance positive test, but the veteran opted to retire instead of play a half season at age 35. He hadn’t been on the field since 2008.

1 (con’t) – WR Maurice Purify, Bengals (1 game for violating league’s personal-conduct policy) – Purify, who played five games as a rookie last year, got a one-game suspension for violating the league’s personal-conduct policy. Purify faced an uphill battle to make the Bengals roster even before the suspension.

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Cushing crushed

Texans OLB Brian Cushing, who made the Pro Bowl and won defensive rookie of the year honors last season, will miss the first four games of the 2010 season after violating the NFL’s substance-abuse policy. Below are some thoughts on what this suspension means to Cushing and the Texans; we’ll compare this suspension to others in effect at the start of the 2010 season in a later post.

Cushing, the defending defensive rookie of the year, was flagged for four games for a performance-enhancing substance. He denies using steroids, as so many who are flagged for this offense do, and the fact that rumors about Cushing date back to high school make his denials seems hollow. But while this seems like a big deal, it won’t cling to his career over the long term. After all, who remembers that Julius Peppers got a similar suspension in a similarly fine rookie season? How many of us count Shawne Merriman among this offense’s alumni? It’s a shame that Cushing tested positive, because it does taint his fine rookie season. But our hunch is that five years from now, play and not positive tests will be what we think of when we consider Cushing.

For the Texans, meanwhile, losing perhaps their most impactful defensive player is a blow. Houston finally broke the .500 barrier for the first time last season, and the offseason was designed to take the next step and make the playoffs. But without Cushing, impact defensive plays will have to come from DeMeco Ryans and Mario Williams. Cushing’s versatility will be missed, and four games – including Houston’s home shot against the Colts – are more than enough to impede a playoff run before it even begins.

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Santonio’s situation

In a Sunday-night stunner, the Steelers swapped WR Santonio Holmes to the Jets in exchange for a fifth-round draft pick in next week’s draft. Here are some thoughts on the trade; you can see how it compares to the other deals this offseason in this updated post.

Holmes hasn’t made a Pro Bowl yet in his four-year career, but his postseason breakout two winters ago, which culminated in a Super Bowl 43 MVP trophy, signifies that his on-field career is on the upswing. Holmes backed up his star turn with a career-high 79 catches and 1,248 yards last season, and it appeared that he was on track to replace Hines Ward as the Steelers’ No. 1 receiver. But off-the-field issues persisted, and the Steelers learned that Holmes was subject to a four-game suspension to start the 2010 season. So with Holmes entering a contract year, the Steelers decided they weren’t going to pay him big bucks and that they wanted to get something – anything – for him in return. It’s much like the call the Steelers made to let Plaxico Burress, another first-round pick, go despite his on-field promise a few years back. The Jets hope that Holmes can have the impact in green in New York that Burress did in blue. Holmes is more consistent than Braylon Edwards in terms of catching the ball, and he and Edwards combine to give Mark Sanchez quality deep threats that will scare defenses. If the Jets can get Holmes to walk the straight and narrow, this trade will be a big win for them. Regardless, by paying just a fifth-round pick (No. 155 overall) for a player in the final year of his contract, the Jets are taking on little risk. The Steelers now look to Mike Wallace, who had quite a nice rookie season, to step up opposite Ward. That’s feasible, but Pittsburgh no longer has an heir apparent to Ward as their No. 1 receiver. Maybe they get one in this year’s draft, or maybe there’s another plan in place. But trading Holmes, while it may be a solid organizational decision, isn’t going to upgrade the Steeler passing game.

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A Friday in February

The Super Bowl isn’t yet a week past, and Valentine’s Day isn’t till Sunday, but we’re already starting to see some roster movement in the NFL. Here are some thoughts on a few key cuts and signings. We’ll compare all February signings in an upcoming post and the most impactful cutbacks before the new league year opens the free-agent doors.

Dolphins cut OLB Joey Porter – Porter, who had nine sacks last season and 32 in three Miami seasons, asked for his release, hoping for one more payday before his career ends. That cut is forthcoming, though it will be March before it’s official. The mouthy 11-year veteran can still get around the corner on the pass rush, and that gives him value to 3-4 teams. But Porter’s opinion of himself now outrates his actual performance, and that may deter some teams. Still, for a 3-4 team on the edge of contention like San Francisco or Denver, or a contender like Green Bay, Porter could become a nice third-down option at a medium-range price.

Giants cut MLB Antonio Pierce – Pierce came over to the Giants as a high-dollar free agent five years ago, and he delivered on that contract by serving as a team leader and a big-time tackler during his tenure, which included a Super Bowl title. But Pierce missed the second half of the ’09 season with a bulging disc in his neck, and with a contract calling for him to make $4.75 million in cash this year, the Giants decided there were cheaper and healthier options. While the Giants don’t have a successor in place, they’ll likely look for a cheaper alternative or perhaps even draft a middle linebacker. Pierce, meanwhile, will look to latch on somewhere as a veteran hand and a locker-room leader, but he won’t come close to his scheduled salary. Instead, he’ll be a veteran minimum guy who becomes a stopgap option for a team looking for MLB or ILB help but not part of the long-term plan.

Jaguars cut WR Torry Holt, OT Tra Thomas, and DT Rob Meier – The Jaguars started another youth movement by sending Holt, Thomas, and Meier packing. Holt and Thomas were free-agent signees last year who were meant to bridge the gap to a group of youngsters. With the development of OTs Eugene Monroe and Eben Britton, Thomas became expendable, while Mike Thomas and Mike Sims-Walker surpassed Holt by the end of the season. Both vets are probably still good enough to be backups in the NFL, but they’ll have to do so at prices even more reduced than what they played for last year. Meier, who has been a Jag since 2000, missed all of last season due to injury and might be at the end of the line.

Bengals sign WR Matt Jones – Jones got a contract just above the league minimum to return to the NFL after missing the entire 2009 season due to suspension and being released by the Jaguars. Jones was largely disappointing in his time in Jacksonville, although his best season was his last one. But he can provide a big and fast option across from Chad Ochocinco, replacing what the Bengals lost when Chris Henry died. It’s a low-risk, high-reward gamble which makes sense from a football perspective. However, given the off-field problems the Bengals have had, if this blows up in their face it will cause much more scrutiny. So the Bengals are relying on Jones to behave even more than they are relying on his production.

Falcons re-sign WR Brian Finneran – Finneran has been around forever, and he’s been in Atlanta since 2000. He’s a special-teamer and possession receiver, and while he’s not a big part of the offense, he’s a nice safety net for Matt Ryan and the Dirty Birds. So keeping him makes sense, especially at a team-friendly price.

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FR: 2009 Suspensions

As the season approaches, we thought it would be worth a look at the various suspensions players face to begin the 2009 system. So we’re using Football Relativity to compare the impact of these suspensions on their various teams. Note that this comparison doesn’t attempt to contrast the reasons behind suspensions; the only factor we’re considering in this comparison is how each player’s absence will affect his team or his own career. 10 is the most significant suspension; 1 is the least significant.

Note: The suspensions of Vikings DTs Pat Williams and Kevin Williams, Saints DEs Charles Grant and Will Smith, and Lions DT Grady Jackson are still pending. This “StarCaps” case is going through the court system, and there’s enough delay that all parties involved will be eligible to play in Week One.

10 – WR Plaxico Burress (2 years for violating personal conduct policy) – Burress’ biggest problem is obviously the jail term he is serving for criminal possession of a weapon, but he is ineligible to play in the NFL until after he serves his two-year sentence. That will knock him out of the NFL for the ’09 and ’10 seasons, and it could mark the end of his career given his age and the layoff he’s facing.

9 – Browns WR Donte Stallworth (1 year for violating personal conduct policy) – Stallworth was sentenced to less than a month in jail, but commissioner Goodell ruled that he would have to sit out the entire 2009 season. He is still under contract with the Browns, at least for now, which makes a move to the UFL for the season impossible. So Stallworth will have to sit. He’s still an NFL-caliber receiver, and even a starting-caliber guy, so his return in 2010 will bring some fanfare. But for now, Stallworth continues to pay for his huge mistake.

8 – Jets LB Calvin Pace (4 games for use of banned substance) – Pace, one of the Jets’ high-dollar acquisitions in 2008, said he accidentally took a tainted supplement that caused him to test positive for a performance-enhancer. Regardless of the unoriginality (or truthfulness) of his alibi, Pace’s absence will hurt the Jets. Pace has 13.5 sacks over the past two years in Arizona and New York, and he was a good fit as a pass-rushing OLB in the Jets’ 3-4 last year. As the Jets move to Rex Ryan’s system this year, the aggressiveness of the defense will be dialed up, which will play to Pace’s strengths once he hits the field. In his absence, the Jets are going to need pass rush to come from somewhere. Former first-round pick Vernon Gholston is the most likely candidate, but he just didn’t get it as a rookie. It’ll be interesting to see if the Jets’ D can thrive without Pace, because this looks like a pretty significant loss.

7 – Buccaneers S Tanard Jackson (4 games for violating substance abuse policy) – Jackson isn’t a household name, but he has started every game in both of his first two seasons in Tampa, and he’s becoming the type of playmaking safety that teams covet. So losing Jackson – especially on a defense that has already lost so many veterans – will make the Bucs’ defensive transition even more difficult. This is a huge blow to the Bucs’ hopes of getting off to a good start.

7 (con’t) – Bills RB Marshawn Lynch (3 games for violating personal conduct policy) – Lynch’s litany of off-field issues got him noticed by Roger Goodell, and he’s now serving a three-game suspension for that collection of misdeeds and mistakes. Lynch is a solid if unspectacular back who has more than 1,000 rushing yards in both of his first two seasons. But the Bills have Fred Jackson, another good back, in reserve, and Jackson’s good enough to carry most of the load through September. The real question for Buffalo is whether import Dominic Rhodes can be the kind of backup to Jackson that Jackson normally is to Lynch. I doubt that will happen, but the net effect won’t cost the Bills all that much because of Jackson’s ability.

6 – QB Michael Vick, Eagles (2 games for violating personal conduct policy) – We now know that Vick will be able to return to the NFL field after two games in 2009. The question is whether this penalty is enough to make sure that Vick is no more than a specialty player in the NFL in 2009. The Eagles have ideas on how to use him, but they don’t want to build their offense around a player who has missed two years before missing two games more in ’09. It’ll be interesting to see how Vick adjusts once he returns to the field.

5 – DE Shaun Ellis, Jets (1 game for violating substances and abuse policy) – Ellis, who was benched by the league and fined $100,000 as a result of a 2008 arrest for marijuana possession, will only miss one game, but it’s a significant one for the Jets. That’s because Pace, another member of the Jets’ front seven, is also sidelined for the game. That makes two big chunks out of the Jets’ defense, which will make beating the offensively prolific Texans on the road an even taller task.

4 — PK Garrett Hartley, Saints (4 games for use of banned substance) – Hartley admitted taking Adderall to try to stay awake, saying he wasn’t aware it was forbidden by the NFL. The Saints signed John Carney to fill in for Hartley, and that could be trouble for him, because Carney filled in for Lawrence Tynes with the Giants to begin last year, never gave up the job, and ended up making the Pro Bowl. So Hartley’s job is now in jeopardy because of this suspension.

4 (con’t) – DT Shaun Smith (4 games for use of banned substance) – Smith says he used a water pill, which is banned under the league’s anabolic steroids policy because it can be used as a masking agent. He was with Cleveland last year and with Detroit in training camp, but the Lions cut him just before the season. Smith will hook on elsewhere, because he can be a quality backup defensive tackle or even an average starter, but this suspension will seriously inhibit his market value and keep him from finding a new home quickly.

3 – LB Michael Boley, Giants (1 game for violating personal conduct policy) – Boley, whom the Giants signed from the Falcons in the offseason, will miss a single game. The Giants (and every other team) knew that a suspension was in the offing for Boley when he hit the free agent market, so the fact that this isn’t a surprise should limit its impact. Boley will be a starter, but he’s not so dominant that his absence will upset the Giants’ plans in the opener against the Redskins.

3 (con’t) – Colts DT Ed Johnson (1 game for violating substance-abuse policy) – The Colts cut Johnson last year after he was arrested for drug possession. They re-signed him this offseason because of their glaring need for massive defensive tackles, but Johnson still must sit out for one game with a league suspension. Johnson didn’t play at all in ’08, but he started every game for the Colts in ’07 and should be a contributor to the team’s DT rotation this year. Missing him in the opener against the Jaguars will hurt.

2 – Cardinals TE Ben Patrick (4 games for use of banned substance) – Patrick said he took Adderall to stay awake on a long drive. He wasn’t slated to start in Arizona, but with Steven Spach likely out part of the year after a postseason knee injury, Patrick still had a chance to establish a role as the Cardinals’ primary blocking tight end.

1 – WR Reggie Williams (2 games for violating substances and abuse policy) – Williams, a former first-round pick by the Jaguars who was the team’s best receiver in ’07 and was a contributor in ’08, was arrested earlier this year for possession of a controlled substance. That has severely limited his free-agent value, which wasn’t strong to begin with. While unsigned, he’ll be serving a two-game suspension, and he’ll have to be reinstated by the commissioner before he can return to the field.

1 (con’t) – DE Erasmus James (1 year for violation of substance-abuse policy) – James, a former Vikings’ first-round pick, has been out of the league since playing for the Redskins in 2007. His career was near its end anyway, and this suspension completely closes the door.

1 (con’t) – S Jimmy Williams (1 year for repeat violation of substance-abuse policy) – Williams, who was once a second-round pick in Atlanta, busted out there and then was cut by the 49ers after the 2008 season. This suspension could be the final nail in the coffin for his career, despite the potential he once showed.

1 (con’t) – LB Vince Redd, 4 games – Redd, who played for New England last year, was cut just before reports of his four-game suspension began to emerge. The Chiefs decided that such a bubble player wasn’t worth the wait and cut him.

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