Tag Archives: NFL signings

Post-cutdown signings

Kansas City Chiefs offensive guard Brain Water...

New Patriot Brian Waters. Image via Wikipedia

For National Football Authority, we wrapped up a crazy Sunday of signings and waiver claims. (We’ll add other moves below.) For info on new Bear Brandon Meriwether, new Cardinal Chester Taylor, new Patriot Brian Waters, and many more, click here.

Moves from later in the week:

Panthers (claim CB Darius Butler) – Butler, a former second-round pick, lost his job in New England, but he could find a new home with the CB-needy Panthers. Butler could easily emerge as a top-3 CB there if he can capitalize on his immense physical talent.

Cowboys (add WR Laurent Robinson) – Robinson has had his moments in the NFL, but he’s had even more injuries. Still, he adds nice depth to a top-heavy Cowboys WR corps.

Browns (add OG Artis Hicks) – Hicks is a versatile lineman who can play guard or tackle. He’s an ideal sixth lineman, but with Eric Steinbach hurt he may fit into the starting lineup for now in Cleveland.

Steelers (add OT Tony Hillis) – Hillis adds depth at a tackle position that’s been a huge problem for the Steelers in recent years.

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The last signings

Jeremy Shockey during a 2007 training camp Cat...

New Panther Jeremy Shockey. Image via Wikipedia

This may be the last week of NFL transactions for a long, long time. And as teams and players prepare for a potential lockout, a few deals are being made. So today and tomorrow, we’re going to look at these moves and their impact on the field in 2011. Today, we start with the last signings; tomorrow, we’ll look at salary-cap clearing cuts.

Saints add DT Shaun Rogers, keep RB Pierre Thomas – Rogers, who was released by the Browns last month, can still be a disruptive force inside. So you can see why the Saints wanted him in the middle of their defense. Rogers got a $4 million contract (reportedly $2 million less than he was offered elsewhere), which is pretty good money but reasonable for a starter. But it’s a good deal for the Saints, for two reasons. One, not many guys are available because of CBA limbo, and Rogers is clearly the best defensive lineman available at this point. And getting Rogers on a one-year deal should ensure that he stays motivated and focused throughout the season, since the carrot of another payday is out there. Give the Saints credit for anteing up and making a deal while they can. Thomas got a four-year, $12 million deal to remain in New Orleans after a rather contentious contract squabble throughout 2010. The deal is worth it to the Saints because they saw how their offense fell off when Thomas’ solid if unspectacular production wasn’t in the lineup in 2010 due to injury.

Chargers add S Bob Sanders – When healthy, Sanders is a premier in-the-box safety who hits like a ton of bricks and makes plays as a tackler, blitzer, and coverman. But Sanders has been healthy far too infrequently in the past three years, which led the Colts to cut their losses on the former defensive player of the year. But the Chargers were more than happy to take a one-year shot on Sanders, hoping to catch lightning in a bottle (or on the helmet?) and get a premium player for cheap. For a defense with far too few impact plays last year, it’s a good gamble. But Chargers fans should remember Sanders’ health problems just as much as they remember his highlight film.

Patriots add NT Marcus Stroud – Stroud, who had been released by Buffalo, moves within the AFC East to the Patriots. New England hopes that, like Gerard Warren last year, Stroud can provide sturdy play in a limited role. If he can do so, it will allow the Pats to use standout Vince Wilfork as a 3-4 defensive end in addition to a nose tackle, which makes the Pats defense more dangerous and more versatile. So for a contending team like the Patriots, giving Stroud a two-year deal to play a specific role makes sense.

Redskins add S O.J. Atogwe – The Redskins love to make a free-agency splash, but with the lockout looming, the pool of players was limited. Still, they spent big money on Atogwe, the turnover-causing machine from the Rams. Atogwe could combine with LaRon Landry, who had a breakout season in 2010, to provide an elite safety pair, and Atogwe’s ability in coverage makes him a nice compliment to Landry, who’s at his best in the box. Plus, Atogwe played some of his best ball in St. Louis under current Redskins defensive coordinator Jim Haslett. But the five-year, $26 million deal is miles beyond any other deal on this list, and it makes you wonder if this is a savvy move or an overreaching headline grab by the Skins.

Panthers add TE Jeremy Shockey – Shockey was released by the Saints after an injury-plagued tenure there, and now he lands with the division-rival Panthers on a one-year deal. His former University of Miami tight ends coach Rob Chudzinksi is the new offensive coordinator in Carolina, so there will be some familiarity for him there. Shockey is still a good (not great, but good) receiver, and if he can stay healthy he’ll add an element to the Panthers’ offense that hasn’t been there in a while.

Texans keep TE Owen Daniels – Daniels, who was miffed to get a restricted free-agent tender instead of a long-term deal last season, was paid off for his patience this year with a four-year deal worth up to $22 million with $13 million in guarantees. It rightfully pays Daniels as a top-10 tight end, which he has proven to be. Daniels’ receiving ability adds an important dimension to the Texans’ offense, and now that he’s healthy, it should help Matt Schaub and Andre Johnson find a few more openings for big plays.

Seahawks keep RB Leon Washington – Washington, whom the Seahawks acquired in a draft-day trade last offseason, got a four-year, $12.5 million deal with another $3.5 million in incentives. That’s a nice payday that Washington has been seeking for several years. Washington is an elite returner – he practically won a game against the Chargers by himself with two kickoff return touchdowns last year – and he is also a dangerous third-down back. The price may be steep, but Washington adds value in his role.

Bills keep OT Mansfield Wrotto and S George Wilson – Wrotto, whom the Bills signed off the scrap heap at midseason last year, ended up starting seven games for the Bills, earning a callback for 2011. Wilson serves as Buffalo’s special-teams captain and also has started some games at safety.

Giants keep RB Danny Ware – Ware, who has been the Giants’ third-string back the past couple of years, returns to provide depth. That’s important considering that Brandon Jacobs is likely on the outs and Ahmad Bradshaw is a free agent.

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Commitment to excellence? You bet

The Raiders have long proclaimed their commitment to excellence, and while the on-field results haven’t been strong lately, the motto rings true in one area – the kicking game. The Raiders proved it once again by signing PK Sebastian Janikowski, a potential unrestricted free agent, to a long-term contract Tuesday. Below are some thoughts on the deal, which we’ll compare to others in our upcoming February signings post. And as a little kicker bonus, we’ve included nuggets on the Bengals and Redskins kicking games as well.

Janikowski, the only kicker in two generations to be a first-round draft pick, signed the biggest contract ever given to a kicker. He’ll get $9 million guaranteed in a four-year deal scheduled to pay him $16 million total. That’s the same amount the Raiders gave All-Pro punter Shane Lechler last offseason. Janikowski isn’t the clear best at his position like Lechler is, but the kicker known as Sea-Bass had a career year in 2009, making 26-of-29 field goals, including a 61-yarder that’s one of the longest in league history. He has one of the strongest legs in the league and is one of a dying breed of placekickers who thrive on kickoffs as well. So he’s clearly a top-5 kicker, if not the very best in the league. While you can argue the wisdom of committing so many resources to one area of the team, the Raiders have ensured continued excellence in the kicking game. At least they’re paying for quality.

In Cincinnati, the Bengals signed PK Dave Rayner. Rayner, who has kicked for five teams, looks to be the replacement for Shayne Graham, whom the Bengals don’t plan to re-sign after his playoff failings. Rayner’s no great shakes, but he’s at least worth a shot in a training-camp battle with someone.

In Washington, the Redskins signed PK Justin Medlock. The Redskins, who cut Shaun Suisham midway through the ’09 season, are taking a look at Medlock, a former Chiefs draft choice who lasted just one regular-season game with the Chiefs in ’07. Medlock went to Canada in ’09 and thrived with Toronto, leading to another shot with the Redskins. Graham Gano (a UFL import) did a decent job with the ‘Skins at the end of the ’09 season, but Medlock provides competition that should allow Washington to end up with a young kicker with upside.

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In the trenches – Franklin tagged, Amano signed

The NFL news on Monday was in the trenches Monday, as the Titans re-signed starting left guard Eugene Amano and as reports emerged that the 49ers were going to use one of their franchise tags on NT Aubrayo Franklin. Below are thoughts on both moves. We’ll compare them to other February signings and franchise tags in upcoming posts.

In Tennessee, Amano was ready to become an unrestricted free agent whether or not 2010 was an uncapped year, and so the Titans were in danger of losing him. Instead, they inked him to a new five-year contract. Amano has emerged as a left guard starter over the last two seasons, and he also is able to play center, which is a key because Titans starter Kevin Mawae is a free agent who has already logged 16 seasons in the NFL. Amano’s versatility, and the paucity of starting-caliber offensive linemen who will hit the open market, made him a priority for the Titans (with good reason, according to Daniel Jeremiah of MovetheSticks.com). Tennessee, which has terrific OTs David Stewart and Michael Roos locked up long term, now knows that they’ll have a good measure of continuity on the line with or without Mawae. Amano, meanwhile, gets some financial security and the chance to stay in the same city where he has played his whole career. It takes that kind of win-win to get a deal done this far before the free-agent market opens.

In San Francisco, Franklin doesn’t get the pub that other 3-4 nose tackles do, but he’s developed into a solid player at that position since joining the 49ers from Baltimore three seasons ago. After four seasons as a backup in Baltimore, Franklin has been a full-time starter in San Francisco, and his ability to take on blocks has helped Patrick Willis and the rest of the Niners’ defense fly around. That makes Franklin a core player in San Francisco, which makes it no surprise that the Niners decided it was worth a guaranteed $7 million in 2010 to keep him. Franklin may not be quite the impact player that fellow NT Vince Wilfork is for New England, but he’s better than a declining Casey Hampton of Pittsburgh and is a guy San Francisco just can’t afford to lose. This is good use of the tag by the 49ers, especially in an uncapped year, because Franklin is a big reason their defense is emerging as a force.

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A Friday in February

The Super Bowl isn’t yet a week past, and Valentine’s Day isn’t till Sunday, but we’re already starting to see some roster movement in the NFL. Here are some thoughts on a few key cuts and signings. We’ll compare all February signings in an upcoming post and the most impactful cutbacks before the new league year opens the free-agent doors.

Dolphins cut OLB Joey Porter – Porter, who had nine sacks last season and 32 in three Miami seasons, asked for his release, hoping for one more payday before his career ends. That cut is forthcoming, though it will be March before it’s official. The mouthy 11-year veteran can still get around the corner on the pass rush, and that gives him value to 3-4 teams. But Porter’s opinion of himself now outrates his actual performance, and that may deter some teams. Still, for a 3-4 team on the edge of contention like San Francisco or Denver, or a contender like Green Bay, Porter could become a nice third-down option at a medium-range price.

Giants cut MLB Antonio Pierce – Pierce came over to the Giants as a high-dollar free agent five years ago, and he delivered on that contract by serving as a team leader and a big-time tackler during his tenure, which included a Super Bowl title. But Pierce missed the second half of the ’09 season with a bulging disc in his neck, and with a contract calling for him to make $4.75 million in cash this year, the Giants decided there were cheaper and healthier options. While the Giants don’t have a successor in place, they’ll likely look for a cheaper alternative or perhaps even draft a middle linebacker. Pierce, meanwhile, will look to latch on somewhere as a veteran hand and a locker-room leader, but he won’t come close to his scheduled salary. Instead, he’ll be a veteran minimum guy who becomes a stopgap option for a team looking for MLB or ILB help but not part of the long-term plan.

Jaguars cut WR Torry Holt, OT Tra Thomas, and DT Rob Meier – The Jaguars started another youth movement by sending Holt, Thomas, and Meier packing. Holt and Thomas were free-agent signees last year who were meant to bridge the gap to a group of youngsters. With the development of OTs Eugene Monroe and Eben Britton, Thomas became expendable, while Mike Thomas and Mike Sims-Walker surpassed Holt by the end of the season. Both vets are probably still good enough to be backups in the NFL, but they’ll have to do so at prices even more reduced than what they played for last year. Meier, who has been a Jag since 2000, missed all of last season due to injury and might be at the end of the line.

Bengals sign WR Matt Jones – Jones got a contract just above the league minimum to return to the NFL after missing the entire 2009 season due to suspension and being released by the Jaguars. Jones was largely disappointing in his time in Jacksonville, although his best season was his last one. But he can provide a big and fast option across from Chad Ochocinco, replacing what the Bengals lost when Chris Henry died. It’s a low-risk, high-reward gamble which makes sense from a football perspective. However, given the off-field problems the Bengals have had, if this blows up in their face it will cause much more scrutiny. So the Bengals are relying on Jones to behave even more than they are relying on his production.

Falcons re-sign WR Brian Finneran – Finneran has been around forever, and he’s been in Atlanta since 2000. He’s a special-teamer and possession receiver, and while he’s not a big part of the offense, he’s a nice safety net for Matt Ryan and the Dirty Birds. So keeping him makes sense, especially at a team-friendly price.

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