Tag Archives: NFL retirements

Will Ronde Barber retire?

For National Football Authority, we break down the rumors about whether long-time Buccaneers CB Ronde Barber will retire. Does Barber want to return? Do the Bucs want him back? What should the two sides do? Click here to read all about it.

Buccaneers CB Ronde Barber, via usatoday.com

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Taylor no longer on the prowl

Fred Taylor, Jacksonville Jaguars running back...

Fred Taylor. Image via Wikipedia

Fred Taylor will announce his retirement this week. The long-time Jaguar, who played the past two years in New England, will sign with the Jags for a day to retire as a member of the franchise. Below are some thoughts on the retirement; you can see how it compares to others in this accumulated post: https://footballrelativity.wordpress.com/2011/05/10/fr-2011-retirements/

Taylor had a fine 11-year career, running for 11,695 yards with seven 1,000-yard seasons. For a long time, he was known as the best player never to make a Pro Bowl, but he finally got the Hawaii trip in 2007, his last thousand-yard campaign. He finishes his career at No. 15 on the all-time rushing list, which is quite an accomplishment, and he has a strong 4.6 yards per carry average in his career. He’s not a Hall of Famer, but he is probably the best Jaguar ever. That’s saying something.

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Bulger bails

St. Louis Rams quarterback Marc Bulger in the ...

Marc Bulger. Image via Wikipedia

Once thought to be one of the better quarterbacks on the free agent market, Marc Bulger passed up opportunities to be a starter once again – or to return to Baltimore as a backup – and retired. Below are some thoughts on Bulger’s career; you can see how he compares to other 2011 retirees in this post.

Bulger’s career started with a whimper, but before he was done he made some pretty significant impacts in the NFL. The sixth-round pick by the Saints in 2000 landed with the Rams and broke into the starting lineup in 2002. Before long, he had replaced Kurt Warner as a triggerman in Mike Martz’s Greatest Show on Turf offense, and Bulger wasn’t much of a drop-off. He made Pro Bowls in 2003 and 2006 as he completed 60-percent plus of his passes and had three 20-plus TD seasons. But Bulger also took a terrific beating, suffering at least 37 sacks in five different seasons (plus 26 in a half season in 2005). By 2007, Bulger’s performance in St. Louis started to decline, and he lost the starting job for good in St. Louis in 2009. Last season, Bulger didn’t play as Joe Flacco’s backup in Baltimore. And this season, he had the chance to return to Baltimore as a backup, or to fight for starting jobs in Arizona and Carolina, among other places. But Bulger’s heart wasn’t in it any more. His former teammate at West Virginia (and for a year with the Rams), Anthony Becht, blamed the Rams on Bulger’s somewhat early retirement. Becht tweeted: “Marc Bulger retires and is better than 70 percent of the QBs in the league right now. You can thank the Rams for his shortened career. After taking so many hits with that offensive line that they would never spend money on to help him carve up defenses like he could. Took the passion right out of him. Congrats my friend on a spectacular career that could have been much better… Opportunities weren’t the reason Bulger retired. That’s a fact. Know for sure 6 NFL teams wanted his services this year.” Whether or not Becht is correct, Bulger leaves with a solid 10-year career that far outpaced his draft position. Leaving that kind of legacy – and leaving when you want – is a pretty fond way to say goodbye.

*Language translated from Twitter-ese

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Moss makes his exit

Randy Moss #81 of the New England Patriots bef...

Randy Moss retires. Image via Wikipedia

When he didn’t get a free-agent contract like he wanted, Randy Moss opted to retire Monday. Some are speculating that Moss’s retirement is premature and that it may change, but for now we want to remember Moss’s fascinating career. Below are our thoughts; you can see how he compares to other 2011 retirees in this post.

Moss had a 13-year career with incredible highs. He burst onto the scene as a rookie with the Vikings, earning All-Pro accolades as a rookie. He had five Pro Bowls in his first six season with the Vikings, along with three first-team All-Pro nods, but he grew unhappy in Minnesota and his play slumped in 2004. He moved to Oakland, where he had a mid-career lull and seemed to be on his last legs. The Raiders gave up, and Moss went to New England and exploded once again, catching 23 touchdown passes and returning to first-team All-Pro status during the Patriots’ undefeated regular season in 2007. Moss had three 1,000-yard seasons in New England and made two Pro Bowls, but in 2010 the team traded him back to the Vikings. As had happened too often in his career, off-field issues affected Moss in Minnesota, and he was released to land with Tennessee via waivers. Despite the infamous ending to his career, Moss is in the top 10 all time in catches (8th), receiving yards (5th), and receiving touchdowns (2nd). Moss had some lows in his career (as did other prominent receivers of his era), but his highs were as good as any receiver in the post-Rice era. Ultimately, the off-field issues will fade, and Moss will be remembered as a Hall of Fame receiver.

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Woody wouldn’t in 2011

Damien Woody at a New York Jets mini-camp in F...

Damien Woody. Image via Wikipedia

Amidst the flurry of NFL transactions on Tuesday (posts coming forthwith) came the announcement that Jets ORT Damien Woody had opted to retire. Below are some thoughts on Woody’s career; we compare him to other 2011 retirees in this updated post.

Woody, a former first-round pick in New England, had a long career in which he played virtually everywhere on the offensive line. He started out as a center, making one Pro Bowl for the Pats and starting for the team’s 2001 Super Bowl champ. He then moved to left guard in 2003, starting for another Pats championship squad. He moved on to Detroit as a free agent, starting three seasons at right guard before moving to right tackle. He then spent three more years as a Jet, starting at right tackle. His versatility no doubt elongated his career, and to the end he remained an effective run blocker. He had good if not great athleticism for a lineman, which made him effective as well. After starting 166 games in 12 seasons, Woody can retire knowing that he made the most of his opportunities – no matter where on the offensive line they came. Now the Jets turn to Wayne Hunter, who got a four-year, $13 million contract the same day Woody retired, as their new right tackle.

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Jackpot retires

As training camp nears, more and more veterans are calling it a career rather than going back to the grind. Ex-Jets NT Kris Jenkins joined the retirement parade this week, announcing he would hang up his cleats instead of signing a new deal as a free agent. Below are some thoughts on Jenkins’ career; we compare his legacy to other 2011 retirees in this updated post.

Kris Jenkins, courtesy football.about.com

Jenkins had a terrific two-act career, starring as a 4-3 defensive tackle in Carolina and then making just as much of an impact as a 3-4 nose tackle with the Jets. The result was three All-Pro nods and four Pro Bowl berths in a 10-year career. Jenkins might have been the best defensive lineman in football during his prime in Carolina, at least before major injuries shortened his 2004 season and cost him nearly the entire 2005 campaign. Injuries also cost Jenkins in his last two years as a Jet, although he gave the team a terrific first-season performance after it gave up two draft picks to acquire him in 2008. (His New York star turn was also when we gave him one of our favorite nicknames ever – Jackpot.) Jenkins was hurt too much over his 10 years to make the Hall of Fame conversation, but he was a terrific, impactful player for two strong contenders. That’s a fine legacy to leave.

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Once a Buckeye, always a Buckeye: Vrabel retires from NFL

Mike Vrabel heeded the call of his alma mater, retiring after a 14-year NFL career to become the linebackers coach at Ohio State. (Excuse me – THE Ohio State University.) Below are some thoughts on Vrabel’s decision and his career; we compare his legacy to other NFLers who have retired this offseason in this post.

Mike Vrabel, courtesy nflgridirongab.com

Vrabel was the ultimate Bill Belichick player. After four seasons in Pittsburgh in which he was primarily a backup, Vrabel was one of the 19 unrestricted free agents whom Belichick signed for the Patriots after his first season, and thus he became a part of the team-first group that upset the Rams and won the Super Bowl. Vrabel became a mainstay for the Pats, starting at outside linebacker for eight seasons and providing solid play against the run, the pass, and as a rusher. His versatility didn’t just apply to defense; he also played a little tight end in goal-line situations, recording 10 TD catches over the course of his career. When Scott Pioli left the Patriots to become the GM in Kansas City, he got Vrabel as part of the Matt Cassel trade, and Vrabel started for two more seasons as part of the Chiefs’ recent renaissance. Vrabel fit the Belichick wish list to a tee – versatile, team-oriented, good but not overly talented, smart, and productive. Now he goes back to his alma mater to help the Buckeyes try to recover from the Jim Tressel mess. Vrabel left a bit of meat on the bone with his playing career, but if he takes to coaching he could become even more of a star in that arena than he was on the playing field.

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