Tag Archives: mike nolan

Smith sticks with San Francisco

Alex Smith, quarterback of the San Francisco 49ers

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In a lockout offseason when NFL transactions are prohibited, Alex Smith’s declaration Thursday that he has decided to re-sign with the 49ers is news because it’s, well, news. Here are our thoughts on the match.

Smith, the former No. 1 overall pick, will always be compared to Aaron Rodgers, the other top quarterback in the 2005 draft. Of course, Smith can’t come close to measuring up in such a comparison, but it’s not all his fault. Smith has been through countless offensive systems under head coaches Mike Nolan, Mike Singletary, and now Jim Harbaugh, with a different offensive coordinator in every season of his pro career, including the upcoming 2011 campaign. That lack of stability has made development no easy task. But he has been a league-average quarterback at best, and he lost the starting job to Troy Smith at points last year. But Smith will once again be a 49er, most likely on a one-year deal.

It’s a stopgap solution both for player and team. For Smith, the 49ers offer just about his best chance to start in 2011. Had he switched teams, it would have likely been as a backup, given the lockout and the lack of time to prepare and learn a new system. In San Francisco, he’ll enter camp as the favorite to start, at least until rookie Colin Kaepernick is ready. Since Kaepernick is viewed as a developmental prospect, that opens the door for Smith to revitalize his career and make the 49ers or someone else eager to start him in 2012. Plus, Smith will get to learn from Harbaugh, who has a reputation as a QB guru from his college days. If Harbaugh can help Smith unlock his still-present potential, it’s a win-win.

For the 49ers, signing Smith to a one-year contract (likely worth several million dollars) makes the best of a bad situation. Smith got to sit down with Harbaugh on the day when the lockout was briefly lifted in April, so he got the 49ers playbook and some pointers. Smith is actually running the 49ers’ players-only workouts, which speaks to his comfort with Harbaugh’s system. If the lockout were not in place, the 49ers might have looked for an alternate stopgap, because Smith has been disappointing and the last thing the fanbase wants is to see him under center again. But the lockout has forced teams into Plans B, C, G, and X. At least the 49ers and their fans can point to Kaepernick as a potential long-term answer – because Smith can no longer be considered a solution for anything more than the short term.

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RP: Interim coaches

Tennessee Titans head coach on the sidelines d...

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This is once again the year of the interim coach. The league is currently home to three interim coaches – Dallas’ Jason Garrett, who is 3-1 thus far; Minnesota’s Leslie Frazier, who is 2-0; and Denver’s Eric Studesville, who took over for Josh McDaniels Monday.

Those interim coaches are all seeking to become the next Jeff Fisher (pictured right) – assistants who get their chance to take over and use it to become Super Bowl coaches with long tenures.

But history says it simply won’t happen. Fisher is an anomaly – the only interim coach since 1990 to coach in a Super Bowl. That’s not just for the team he was an interim with; it’s for any team at all. In fact, history over the last 20 years says that Garrett, Frazier, and Studesville are pretty much doomed to mediocre careers as head coaches – and that mediocrity is the best-case scenario.

Garrett and Frazier have been considered head-coaching candidates for a while, having interviewed multiple times for openings.* (Studesville is a respected RB coach but this is his first mention as a head coaching candidate.) Garrett and Frazier have good chances to become the full-time head coaches of their teams, both because of the financial benefit to their franchises given the impending lockout and because of their standing as hot prospects.

*Both Garrett and Frazier have interviewed for multiple other head-coaching jobs.
Garrett interviewed for Ravens/Falcons 2008, Lions/Broncos/Rams 2009
Frazier interviewed for Dolphins/Falcons 2008, Lions/Rams/Broncos 2009, Bills/Seahawks 2010

Below, we analyze every interim head coach in the NFL over the last 20 seasons, and you’ll see just how bad the news is for Garrett and Frazier in terms of historical precedent.

Home runs
Jeff Fisher, Oilers, 1994. Replaced Jack Pardee and went 1-5 with team that finished 2-14. Lasted 17 seasons and counting. Previous head-coaching experience: No.

Fisher is the only interim coach who coached any team to the Super Bowl.  He has six playoff appearances in 17 years and an overall 146-123 record.

Short-term successes (Winning records translated to full-time jobs)
Bruce Coslet, Bengals, 1996. Replaced David Shula and went 7-2 with team that finished 8-8. Lasted Five seasons. Next job: Not in football. Previous head-coaching experience: Jets.
Mike Singletary, 49ers, 2008. Replaced Mike Nolan and went 5-4 with team that finished 7-9. Lasted: Three seasons and counting.
Ideal examples: Raymond Berry, Patriots; Ray Malavisi, Rams; Don Coryell, Chargers

Coslet’s seven wins in his interim year matched his high over the next four years. Singletary has not made the playoffs with the 49ers either and appears to be in trouble.

Holdovers
Dave McGinnis, Cardinals, 2000. Replaced Vince Tobin and went 1-8 with team that finished 3-13. Lasted: Four seasons. Next job: Titans LB coach.
Dick LeBeau, Bengals, 2000. Replaced Bruce Coslet and went 4-9 with team that finished 4-12. Lasted: Three seasons. Next job: Bills assistant head coach.
Mike Tice, Vikings, 2001. Replaced Dennis Green and went 0-1 with team that finished 5-11. Lasted: Five seasons. Next job: Jaguars assistant head coach.
Tom Cable, Raiders, 2008. Replaced Lane Kiffin and went 4-8 with team that finished 5-11. Lasted: Three seasons and counting. Previous head-coaching experience: University of Idaho.
Ideal example: Marv Levy, Bills

McGinnis and LeBeau were veteran assistants who got their chance as interims but never cut it as head coaches. Cable has the Raiders playing well this year, but it’s too soon to offer him as a success story. Tice is the rare interim coach who led his team to the playoffs. He had two winning records and one playoff appearance in four full seasons.

First shots
Terry Robiskie, Redskins, 2000. Replaced Norv Turner and went 1-2 with team that finished 8-8. Lasted: That season. Next job: Browns WR coach.
Jim Bates, Dolphins, 2004. Replaced Dave Wannstedt and went 3-4 with team that finished 4-12. Lasted: That season. Next job: Packers defensive coordinator. Previous head-coaching experience: San Antonio Gunslingers (USFL).
Joe Vitt, Rams, 2005. Replaced Mike Martz and went 4-7 with team that finished 6-10. Lasted: That season. Next job: Saints assistant head coach.
Emmitt Thomas, Falcons, 2007. Replaced Bobby Petrino and went 1-2 with team that finished 4-12. Lasted: That season. Next job: Chiefs DB coach (2010).
Perry Fewell, Bills, 2009. Replaced Dick Jauron and went 3-4 with team that finished 6-10. Lasted: That season. Next job: Giants defensive coordinator.
Ideal examples: Marty Schottenheimer, Browns

None of these examples got head-coaching jobs anywhere in the future, although Fewell could find his name on prospect lists in the future.

Placeholders
Rick Venturi, Colts, 1991. Replaced Ron Meyer and went 1-10 with team that finished 1-15. Lasted:  That season. Next job: Colts defensive coordinator. Previous head-coaching experience: Northwestern University.
Rick Venturi, Saints, 1996. Replaced Jim Mora and went 1-7 with team that finished 3-13. Lasted: That season. Next job: Saints assistant head coach. Previous head-coaching experience: Northwestern University, Colts (interim).
June Jones, Chargers, 1998. Replaced Kevin Gilbride and went 3-7 with team that finished 5-11. Lasted: That season. Next job: University of Hawaii head coach. Previous head-coaching experience: Falcons.
Gary Moeller, Lions, 2000. Replaced Bobby Ross and went 4-3 with team that finished 9-7. Lasted: That season. Next job: Jaguars defensive coordinator. Previous head-coaching experience: University of Michigan.
Wade Phillips, Falcons, 2003. Replaced Dan Reeves and went 2-1 with team that finished 5-11. Lasted: That season. Next job: Chargers defensive coordinator. Previous head-coaching experience: Bills, Broncos, Saints (interim).
Terry Robiskie, Browns, 2004. Replaced Butch Davis and went 1-5 with team that finished 4-12. Lasted: That season. Next job: Dolphins WR coach. Previous head-coaching experience: Redskins (interim).
Dick Jauron, Lions, 2005. Replaced Steve Mariucci and went 1-4 with team that finished 5-11. Lasted: That season. Next job: Bills head coach. Previous head-coaching experience: Bears.
Jim Haslett, Rams, 2008. Replaced Scott Linehan and went 2-10 with team that finished 2-14. Lasted: That season. Next job: Florida Tuskers head coach (UFL). Previous head-coaching experience: Saints.

Phillips (Dallas) and Jauron (Buffalo) were the only people in this group to go on to head-coaching jobs elsewhere, and they both already had head-coaching jobs on their resumes. Phillips joins Tice and Fisher as the only interim coach in the last 20 years to go on to a playoff appearance as a head coach.

HT to Real Clear Sports and Business Insider for the history lessons.

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The league’s best coordinators

Our latest post for the Most Valuable Network’s Football Wire focuses on the best coordinators in the NFL for the 2009 season. Check out the post via archive from our MVN blog below.

And in case you missed it, you can how teams fare in terms of the combination of offensive and defensive coordinators in our Football Relativity comparison.

Who are the best coordinators in the NFL? Over on www.footballrelativity.com, we spent plenty of time and bandwidth trying to figure out which NFL team has the best combination of offensive and defensive coordinators. You can check that post out over there, but we wanted to take some of what we learned in the research for that post to create a list of some of the best and most important coordinators in the NFL in 2009.

So here are our votes for the best coordinators in the NFL, in a few categories:

Best Offensive Coordinator – Mike Mularkey, Falcons. Mularkey, who was once the Bills’ head coach, had a great season for the Falcons last year. He rode the legs of Michael Turner, set rookie QB Matt Ryan up for success, and continued the ascension of Roddy White as a true No. 1 receiver. Now he has a new toy to play with – TE Tony Gonzalez, one of the best red-zone threats ever. Another good season like that, and Mularkey will be interviewing for head-coaching jobs once again.

Honorable mentions: Scott Linehan (Lions) returns to the coordinator ranks after a failed tenure as Rams head coach. He’s had great success in this position before. Cam Cameron (Ravens) had a good season last year, reinforcing his coordinator chops. Jason Garrett (Cowboys) had a rough ’08 season but is still considered a rising star as an offensive tactician.

Best Defensive Coordinator – Dick LeBeau, Steelers – The creator of the zone-blitz scheme is still going strong in his 70s. He is a master technician who has created a scheme that has been in place in Pittsburgh for so long that it’s second nature for the team to find the personnel that fits. That lets the Steelers find guys who might not fit on other teams – James Harrison, Lamarr Woodley, Aaron Smith – and utilize them as big-time playmakers. Plus, players love playing for LeBeau. He’s a great asset to the Steelers and to the NFL as a whole.

Honorable mentions: Dom Capers (Packers) and Mike Nolan (Broncos) are former head coaches who are stepping into new situations to try to implement the 3-4 defense. Both are specialists in that scheme, and both have a track record of success as coordinators. Leslie Frazier (Vikings) does his job quietly but effectively. He has a beast of a unit in Minnesota, and he knows how to use his talent well. His head-coaching chance is coming, and it’s coming soon.

Best legendary offensive coordinator – Dan Henning, Dolphins – Henning’s solid schemes are creative enough to allow for new ideas, and he is open-minded enough to let ideas like the Wildcat into his offense. Henning was successful as a coordinator in Washington in the 1980s, and after a few head coaching stops, he’s had success in Carolina and then in Miami in this decade. That’s a really good run for any coach.

Best legendary defensive coordinator – LeBeau

Best up-and-coming offensive coordinator – Jeff Davidson, Carolina – Davidson isn’t the kind of coordinator who gets a lot of attention for designing a multifaceted passing game that lights up the scoreboard and makes fans ooh and aah. (Think of new head coaches like Josh McDaniels or Todd Haley.) But Davidson is brutally effective in designing a running game that can work. First in Cleveland and for the last two years in Carolina, he’s had teams that can run the ball effectively. His scheme fits the Panthers’ personnel perfectly, and if he continues to have the kind of success calling running plays that he has had, he’ll become a hot name in head-coaching hunts in a few years.

Best up-and-coming defensive coordinator – Ron Rivera, Chargers – Rivera took over for Ted Cottrell in San Diego midway through last season, and the difference was apparent immediately. He has an aggressive, blitzing style that echoes his former coach Buddy Ryan as well as his former mentor Jim Johnson. This is Rivera’s second coordinator job, and if he can maximize the Chargers’ talent this year, Rivera will become a prime head-coaching candidate quickly.

Best rookie offensive coordinator – Pete Carmichael, Saints – Talk about a prime situation – Carmichael takes over the reins of an offense that is loaded with talent. Head coach Sean Payton is the playcaller, but Carmichael will still get the luster of helping to run an offense that looks to be a powerhouse again in ’09. Honorable mention: Mike McCoy (Broncos) is a bright coach who will work with McDaniels, which should allow him to develop a good tactical reputation pretty quickly.

Best rookie defensive coordinator – Chuck Cecil, Titans – It’s a strong class of rookie defensive coordinators this year, and Cecil should be the cream of the crop. He’s been an assistant in Tennessee for eight years, and now he takes over for Jim Schwartz as coordinator. The former big-hitting safety should continue the physical style of defense that has made Tennessee a consistent contender over the last decade.  Honorable mention: Sean McDermott (Eagles) takes over for the late Jim Johnson after assisting him for most of the decade. He’ll continue Johnson’s innovative and incessant blitzing. Mike Pettine (Jets) is Rex Ryan’s hand-picked choice to implement Ryan’s version of the 3-4 defense with the Jets. Ryan raves about Pettine, but the new head coach has been prone to hyperbole. Still, Pettine is a prospect to watch. Bill Sheridan (Giants) takes over for Steve Spagnuolo but should continue the defensive scheme that empowered one of the league’s best front fours to attack, attack, attack.

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FR: Coordinator combos

As we approach the NFL season, I thought it might be interesting to examine the relative strength of the offensive and defensive coordinator combos of each NFL team. We’ll compare them using our football relativity tool, with the 10 level being the best combo of coordinators and 1 being the most suspect combo.

(You can start here to get a list of all NFL coaching staffs.)

10 – Steelers – Offense: Bruce Arians; Defense: Dick LeBeau – Arians, who is in his second year as Pittsburgh’s O-coordinator after a previous stint in the position in Cleveland, is a solid, above-average coordinator who is an asset to the coaching staff, especially for a defense-first head coach like Mike Tomlin. LeBeau is a legend – the best defensive coordinator ever and the father of the zone-blitz scheme. He knows the system in his sleep, and even more his players love him and love to play for him. There’s no one better, even though LeBeau is now in his 70s.

9 – Lions – Offense: Scott Linehan; Defense: Gunther Cunningham – New head coach Jim Schwartz hired two veteran hands as his coordinators, and both were good guys to add to his staff. Linehan was a bust as the Rams’ head coach, but he’s an elite offensive coordinator who should help the Lions much as Mike Mularkey helped the Falcons last year. Cunningham, a long-time D-coordinator in K.C. and Tennessee, has an attacking style. He and Schwartz worked together in Tennessee, so they can meld their philosophies to form a system. These hires should help the Lions as they seek to claw their way back to respectability. (Sorry for the pun; couldn’t resist.)

9 (con’t) – Ravens – Offense: Cam Cameron; Defense: Greg Mattison – Cameron, who was a bust as a head coach in Miami, is a good offensive mind who came up with plenty of unique attack methods with an inexperienced offense last year. He’s a strong offensive coordinator. Mattison, who replaces Rex Ryan this year, is a 38-year coaching veteran who is in just his third NFL season but has coordinator experience at Florida, Notre Dame, and Michigan.

9 (con’t) – Dolphins – Offense: Dan Henning; Defense: Paul Pasqualoni – This is an incredibly veteran combo of coordinators. Henning has been in the NFL for nearly 30 years, and he had great success with the Redskins in the ’80s and the Panthers earlier this decade. He tends to have a solid, conservative attack, but he implemented QB coach David Lee’s Wildcat ideas seamlessly last year. He’s perfect for a ball-control style of team. Pasqualoni, the longtime Syracuse head coach, enters his second year as the Dolphins’ D-coordinator. His experience translates, and the success Miami had last year reveals his coaching skill.

8 – Panthers – Offense: Jeff Davidson; Defense: Ron Meeks – Davidson has spent two years as an offensive coordinator and has created a run-first system that was incredibly prolific last year. The former Patriots aide is establishing himself as a quality run-oriented O-coordinator. Meeks, who was Indy’s defensive coordinator for seven seasons, is a veteran who knows the Tampa-2 defense backward and forward. His Colts defenses were speedy if undersized, but he has better talent in Carolina than he did with the Colts. It’ll be interesting to see what he can do with it.

8 (con’t) – Chargers – Offense: Clarence Shelmon; Defense: Ron Rivera – Shelmon, a long-time NFL running backs coach, became the Chargers’ O-coordinator in 2007. The Chargers’ run game has been wonderful during his tenure, and the emergence of Philip Rivers last year adds to the offense’s potency. Obviously, head coach Norv Turner and Shelmon have come up with a version of Turner’s offensive system that works. Rivera took over as the Chargers’ D-coordinator midway through last season, and he made an immediate difference. He favors an attacking style a la Jim Johnson (whom he worked with in Philly) or Buddy Ryan (whom he played for in Chicago). Rivera is establishing a reputation as a top-notch D-coordinator.

7 – Eagles – Offense: Marty Mornihweg; Defense: Sean McDermott – Mornihweg is a long-time assistant who is probably the preeminent West Coast offense coordinator right now. He and Andy Reid will have more skill-position talent to play with this year than ever, so it will be interesting to see how that affects the Eagles’ scheme. McDermott takes over for the late Jim Johnson. He has been an Eagles assistant since 1999 and should know Johnson’s creative blitzing scheme backward and forward. McDermott was the Eagles’ best chance for defensive continuity after Johnson’s passing, so he was the right hire.

7 (con’t) – Cowboys – Offense: Jason Garrett; Defense: none – Garrett, generally considered the Cowboys’ head coach in waiting, is considered a strong tactician, but last year was a downer for him and his reputation. He’ll have to help Tony Romo excel without Terrell Owens this year to prove once and for all that he’s an elite coordinator like a Mike Mularkey. The Cowboys don’t list a defensive coordinator, which means that it’s head coach Wade Phillips’ domain. He’s always been a strong defensive coordinator, which means he knows what he’s doing. The question is whether filling that role will spread the head coach too thin.

7 (con’t) – Falcons – Offense: Mike Mularkey; Defense: Brian VanGorder – Mularkey, a former head coach in Buffalo, is an accomplished offensive coordinator who did a great job in Matt Ryan’s rookie year. He’s an upper-echelon O-coordinator. VanGorder is a talented coach with strong Georgia ties who was an NFL D-coordinator for the first time last year. He has just three years of NFL experience but was also a defensive coordinator at Georgia and a head coach for one year at Georgia Southern. He’s still proving himself as an NFL coordinator, but he seems to be a coach other coaches want on their side.

7 (con’t) – Titans – Offense: Mike Heimerdinger; Defense: Chuck Cecil – Heimerdinger, a former Broncos offensive coordinator, returned to Tennessee last season with good success. He and Jeff Fisher have worked together a lot, and Heimerdinger does a good job of balancing an attacking passing game with a ball-control system. Cecil, who was a take-no-prisoners safety when he played in the NFL, takes over for Jim Schwartz now. Cecil has been an assistant in Tennessee for eight years, and he has a defense-first coach in Jeff Fisher and a veteran LB coach in Dave McGinnis, so he’s really set up for success. If Fisher thinks Cecil is ready for this job, I believe him.

7 (con’t) – Buccaneers – Offense: Jeff Jagodinski; Defense: Jim Bates – Jagodinski, most recently the head coach at Boston College, was a Packers assistant before moving to the college ranks. He seems to have the right mix of experience in the West Coast offense, experience as a leader, and potential to grow to be a good hire for new head coach Raheem Morris. Likewise, Morris made a solid decision by adding long-time veteran Bates as his D-coordinator. He’s been a defensive coordinator at five stops with pretty good success, and players love him.

6 – Giants – Offense: Kevin Gilbride; Defense: Bill Sheridan – Gilbride has been a coordinator for five different NFL teams, along with a head-coaching stop in San Diego. He’s a veteran hand who has worked with Tom Coughlin twice and seems to have a good rapport between his passing proclivity and Coughlin’s ball-control style. He’s a good fit with the Giants, and that makes him an above-average coordinator. Sheridan takes over for the departed Steve Spagnuolo as D-coordinator. Sheridan is a long-time college coach who has five years in the NFL, all with the Giants. He’s a veteran who can continue the attacking style the Giants have used so well in recent years.

6 (con’t) – Bengals – Offense: Bob Bratkowski; Defense: Mike Zimmer – Bratkowski has been the O-coordinator in Cincy for nine years, and he’s had some high-powered offenses over that time. Now that Carson Palmer is back, Bratkowski is capable of guiding a prolific passing game. Zimmer came to Cincinnati from Dallas last year and helped the Bengals quietly become a top-half defense, which was a big improvement from the previous year. He’s a solid coach who might could even more with Keith Rivers healthy and Rey Maualuga in the fold now.

6 (con’t) – Broncos – Offense: Mike McCoy; Defense: Mike Nolan – McCoy, a long-time Panthers aide, was Josh McDaniels’ choice to be the guy who implements his offensive system in Denver. McCoy’s a capable coach, but McDaniels’ system will ultimately be the determinant of his success. Nolan, the former 49ers head coach, was a stud defensive coordinator with the Giants, Redskins, and Ravens, so he’s a good hire for an offense-first head coach like McDaniels. Nolan is a 3-4 coach, so it may take a couple of years to get enough personnel that fits before his system becomes successful. But his pedigree makes it a good bet to give him a few years to get it done.

5 – Jets – Offense: Brian Schottenheimer; Defense: Mike Pettine – Schottenheimer, who was a golden boy after his successful ’07 season, struggled more as a play-caller last year, but new head coach Rex Ryan still went to lengths to keep him with the Jets. The coordinator, who is entering his fourth year in the position, still has potential to be a head coach in the NFL, but he has his work cut out for him with a rookie QB (Mark Sanchez) running the system this year. Pettine is Ryan’s hand-picked aide. They worked together in Baltimore, and so Pettine should be able to communicate Ryan’s all-out attacking style. Ryan considers Pettine a rising star, but we’ll wait to see some evidence before making a similar verdict.

5 (con’t) – Packers – Offense: Joe Philbin; Defense: Dom Capers – Philbin enters his third year as offensive coordinator in Green Bay. His job is to be the strategist who implements head coach Mike McCarthy’s philosophy on a week-to-week basis. The results the last two years have been pretty good, as the Packers have gotten standout performances from Ryan Grant and then Aaron Rodgers. Capers comes on board to bring the 3-4 defense to the Packers. He’s one of the best at using that system, and he usually has been able to get the new defense running quickly. He’s an elite defensive coordinator in the league.

5 (con’t) – Vikings – Offense: Darrell Bevell; Defense: Leslie Frazier – Bevell, a former Wisconsin quarterback under then-Badgers o-coordinator (and now Vikings head coach) Brad Childress, is Brett Favre’s good buddy from his time as a Packers QB coach. Bevell is in his fourth season as a coordinator, and he’s had good running games throughout his tenure. The question is how much of that is about talent and how much is about scheme. As a result, Bevell is still establishing his reputation. Frazier, who is in his second D-coordinator shot after a two-year stint in Cincinnati, has a powerful defense with great talent. Frazier has established himself as a quality coordinator and a future head-coaching candidate.

4 – Chiefs – Offense: Chan Gailey; Defense: Clancy Pendergast – New head coach Todd Haley has veteran coaches who have had success at times but not on an every-year basis. Gailey, a former Cowboys head coach, came up with an offensive system that worked in K.C. last year, but before that his Chiefs experience was checkered. Now he’ll have to adjust his play-calling to fit Haley’s system, which isn’t an easy thing to do. Pendergast worked with Haley in Arizona, but he was fired as the Cardinals’ defensive coordinator for not matching the level of performance Ken Whisenhunt expected. Pendergast had some good years in Arizona getting more out of his defense than the talent seemed to indicate, and he’ll have to do that again in K.C. as he seeks to regain the solid reputation he had just a couple of years ago.

4 (con’t) – Browns – Offense: Brian Draboll; Defense: Rob Ryan – Draboll, a former Patriots assistant who was Eric Mangini’s QB coach the last two years with the Jets, gets his first shot as a coordinator this year. He knows the Belichick system but must prove he can implement it. Ryan, twin brother of new Jets coach Rex Ryan and son of Buddy Ryan, is a wildcat of a coach who runs a hyperaggressive 3-4 defense. He spent the last five years as defensive coordinator in Oakland, where he had some good defenses but also a few clunkers. He was a good hire for Mangini, whom he was on the Patriots’ coaching staff with in the first four years of this decade.

4 (con’t) – Saints – Offense: Pete Carmichael; Defense: Gregg Williams – Carmichael enters his first season as an NFL coordinator after three years as the Saints’ QB coach. Carmichael will work to maintain the success head coach Sean Payton’s system has had, but he’s in a good position to succeed in his first O-coordinator shot. Williams is a long-time defense coordinator known for his aggressive, blitzing style. He’s had great success at many of his stops, but his most recent tenure in Jacksonville wasn’t great. It’ll be interesting to see how Williams adapts to the Saints’ average defensive talent.

4 (con’t) – Patriots – Offense: None; Defense: Dean Pees – Because so many of his assistants have gone on to head-coaching jobs, Bill Belichick’s coordinator list looks thin. On offense, the Patriots don’t list a coordinator, which means Belichick will be intricately involved. QB coach Bill O’Brien is the up-and-comer on that side of the ball, and he should become coordinator in a year or two. On defense, Pees has been the Patriots’ D-coordinator for four years with great success. He’s implementing Belichick’s scheme and style seamlessly after six years assisting the hoodie.

3 – 49ers – Offense: Jimmy Raye; Defense: Greg Manusky – Raye is a veteran NFL coach who has now been a coordinator for seven different teams. He runs a conservative style, which should fit with head coach Mike Singletary’s personality. It will also be good for a young coach like Singletary to have such a veteran assistant on hand. Manusky is in his third season as defensive coordinator in San Fran, so he and Singletary have worked together for a while. They need to create an identity, and to do that they’re going to have to improve the talent they have on hand.

3 (con’t) – Cardinals – Offense: Russ Grimm (run game) and Mike Miller (passing game); Defense: Bill Davis – Grimm is well respected and considered a future NFL head coach, and he can help head coach Ken Whisenhunt implement the Steelers’ style offense he wants to run because, like Whisenhunt, he was an assistant in Pittsburgh. Miller, who was on Steelers staffs too, steps in to help run the passing game. Davis, who spent the last two years as a LB coach for the Cardinals, has only been a D-coordinator once before, in San Francisco in ’05 and ’06, but he’s well schooled in the 3-4 defense in several stops.

3 (con’t) – Texans – Offense: Kyle Shanahan; Defense: Frank Bush – Shanahan, son of Mike Shanahan, is a West Coast guy who helps to implement Gary Kubiak’s offensive system. Shanahan is still young, but he now has six years of NFL experience, and he’s developing his own reputation separate from his father. Bush is in his third year as the Texans’ D-coordinator. The 19-year NFL coach was on the Broncos’ staff with Kubiak during the Super Bowl era of the late 1990s. This is his first coordinator job, and he’s starting to get the kind of players that will allow him to show whether he can be an elite NFL coach at this level.

3 (con’t) – Seahawks – Offense: Greg Knapp; Defense: Casey Bradley – Knapp is a West Coast system guy who had decent success as Jim Mora’s offensive coordinator in Atlanta. While Knapp’s resume is up and down, Seattle seems to be a good fit for him and his style. Bradley is in just his fourth NFL season, having been an assistant in Tampa Bay the past three years. So Mora is banking on him as an up-and-comer, which is a risk but also a potentially beneficial move. Since Mora is a defensive coach, he can probably afford to take a chance on a new coordinator more than other coaches.

3 (con’t) – Colts – Offense: Clyde Christensen; Defense: Larry Coyer – After years of consistency on the staff, the Colts have new coordinators to match their new head coach, Jim Caldwell. Christensen, who has been the QB coach in Indy, moves up a chair. He was offensive coordinator in Tampa Bay for Tony Dungy’s last year there and has the experience to be effective. The fact that former O-coordinator Tom Moore is around as a consultant will help as well. Coyer replaces Ron Meeks, whom the Colts felt was too conservative. He’s expected to bring an aggressive style, but the question is whether that style matches the Colts’ undersized but quick personnel. He was D-coordinator for the Broncos for four years in the middle of this decade, with very mixed results.

2 – Redskins – Offense: Sherman Smith; Defense: Greg Blache – Smith, who was a long-time Titans assistant, is in his second year as the Redskins’ O-coordinator. It’s his first shot after more than 20 years in the league, and the first-year results weren’t wonderful. We’ll see if he can create an offensive uptick this season. Blache has been a defensive coordinator in Chicago in addition to Washington, with mixed success. He seems to be an OK coordinator who can do the job but who doesn’t add a unique element.

2 (con’t) – Raiders – Offense: Ted Tollner (passing game); Defense – John Marshall – The Raiders don’t list an offensive coordinator under new head coach Tom Cable. Tollner, a long-time college head coach who has banged around the NFL in recent years, is the closest candidate, but there’s uncertainty here that would appear to be difficult to bridge. Marshall is a veteran defensive coordinator, but his style doesn’t match the man-to-man coverage system that owner Al Davis prefers (and that Nnamdi Asomugha can run). So he’s a veteran coach who’s a strange fit with the Raiders.

2 (con’t) – Rams – Offense: Pat Shurmur; Defense: Ken Flajole – New head coach Steve Spagnuolo chose two young coaches as his coordinators, which could pay off big but which is also a risk because of the inexperience of the staff as a whole. Shurmur, in his first O-coordinator job, had spent the last seven years as Philly’s QB coach. He should bring a solid West Coast style system to St. Louis, but he won’t have the quality offensive line with the Rams that he enjoyed with the Eagles. Flajole, a position coach in Carolina and Seattle, will be tasked with implenting Spagnuolo’s take on Jim Johnson’s attacking style. Flajole hasn’t been in that system before, so it might be a little bit of a bumpy transition.

1 – Jaguars – Offense: Dirk Koetter; Defense: Mel Tucker – Koetter, the former head coach at Boise State and Arizona State, made his move to the NFL three years ago to become the Jags’ O-coordinator. He’s a passing game guru who has had a solid running game and an underrated passing game during his two seasons so far in Jacksonville. Tucker, who is entering his first seasons as Jax’s D-coordinator, had his first coordinator job in Cleveland last year, with mediocre results. This is only his fifth year in the NFL, and only his second stop after four years with the Browns.

1 (con’t) – Bills – Offense: Turk Schonert; Defense: Perry Fewell – Schonert, a former NFL quarterback and longtime QB coach, was a first-time coordinator last year, and the results weren’t wonderful. Buffalo finished in the bottom 10 both in yards per game and points per game. Schonert has Terrell Owens around this year, but the coach still has to prove his chops. Fewell, a long-time Dick Jauron aide, has not been a defensive coordinator before joining the Bills staff. His defenses have been good but not great since he became D-coordinator in 2006.

1 (con’t) – Bears – Offense: Ron Turner; Defense: Bob Babich – Turner, who is in his second stint as the Bears’ offensive coordinator, was innovative in his first tenure in the 1990s but may have fallen behind the times now. The former Illinois coach needs to prove that he can work with an elite quarterback to produce results. Babich lost his play-calling duties after the ’08 season to head coach Lovie Smith and still has his job only because of Smith’s loyalty.

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