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The final cuts

Yesterday, we prepared for the coming NFL lockout (or, as reports today suggest, extended negotiating window) by looking at the last signings before the league year ended. Now we’re going to look at the final cuts teams have made before the deadline.

The Bears cut DT Tommie Harris. Image via bearsgab.com

Bears cut DT Tommie Harris, LB Hunter Hillenmeyer, and OT Kevin Shaffer – Harris, once the league’s preeminent 4-3 under tackle, has been sapped by injuries and is no longer an impact player. So instead of paying $3 million in offseason bonuses to keep him, the Bears let the former All-Pro go. Harris showed he still had life in his legs with a strong playoff performance against the Seahawks, but at this point he needs to be a featured role player, not a regular starter, so that his legs last longer. Hillenmeyer, a versatile backup and special teams player who had his moments as a starter, is fighting concussions and may not be able to play again. Shaffer, a veteran who served as a third tackle last year, couldn’t hold up as a starter and therefore wasn’t worth the freight.

Redskins cut RB Clinton Portis, OG Derrick Dockery, OLB Andre Carter, and DT Ma’ake Kemeoatu – Portis is going the way of old running backs, and as his performance declines his outsized personality becomes more of a locker-room stumbling block. Dockery, brought back to play guard last year, is a replacement-level player who was making too much money. Carter had a good 2009 season, but he didn’t fit the Redskins’ 3-4 defense in 2010. He could find a nice home as a pass-rushing specialist for a 4-3 team. Kemeoatu’s rebound from an Achilles injury in 2009 didn’t go well, making him too expensive for his performance.

Jets cut NT Kris Jenkins, OT Damien Woody, OLB Vernon Gholston, OLB Jason Taylor, and TE Ben Hartsock – The Jets cleared cap room by letting four vets and one major draft bust go. Jenkins has missed most of the last two seasons with knee injuries, which means he’ll have to plug in somewhere at a much lower price tag. Woody, the starting right tackle, is also trying to come back from injury. Taylor made a few plays but wasn’t a huge impact player, and retirement is lurking for him. Gholston, on the other hand, missed out on a $9 million contract escalator because he failed to record a sack or forced fumble in his first three years. The former top-6 pick has done nothing to validate his draft stock, and anyone that brings him in would be just taking a flyer on the former Jet.

Broncos cut DE Justin Bannan, NT Jamal Williams, TE Daniel Graham – Bannan and Williams, both signed last year, got $14 million in guarantees to step in and start in the Broncos’ 3-4 defense. But now, with John Fox replacing Josh McDaniels and the 4-3 defense coming in, they became extraneous pieces. They’re just more examples of McDaniels’ epically poor performance as a pro personnel evaluator. Graham, a Mike Shanahan signing, would have made more than $4 million next season, so the Broncos decided on the less costly route. He’s still an elite blocking tight end, and that will get him a job elsewhere, although not at the same price.

Lions cut LB Julian Peterson and RB Kevin Smith – Peterson was once the best all-around linebacker in the game, but as he left his prime he became less of a factor for the Lions. Now that he’s 11 years into his career, it’s fair to assume that Peterson’s best days are past. Maybe he can become a specialist and plug in with a contender somewhere, but his jack of all trades days are done. Smith had a nice first couple of years with the Lions, but he has been set back so much by a 2009 ACL injury that he lost the ability to contribute. Now, after falling behind Jahvid Best and Maurice Morris on the depth chart, he’s been released. If he can show he’s healthy, he could be a decent fill-in somewhere, but that seems like a long shot at this point.

Packers cut TE Donald Lee, S Derrick Martin – Lee has put in some good years with the Pack, but the emergence of JerMichael Finley and the play of Andrew Quarless give the Packers better, cheaper options.

Seahawks cut TE Chris Baker – Baker has had some moments as a receiving tight end, but his chance to back up John Carlson was taken by youngster Cameron Morrah this year.

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Fantasy Football Applaud or a Fraud Week 15

Each week, we sort through the box scores to determine what fantasy football performances we should applaud, and which are merely frauds. As always, we’ll give more details about what each verdict means as we break it down.

Rex Grossman of the Redskins

Quarterbacks

 

Matt Flynn, Packers – Flynn’s value only comes if Aaron Rodgers is out again, but Flynn performed well at New England Sunday night, with three TD passes and 251 passing yards, with just one interception. Given Flynn’s top-flight targets, he’s an acceptable emergency option for fantasy owners. If you own Rodgers, feel free to claim Flynn as insurance. Verdict: Applaud

Rex Grossman, Redskins – Grossman had a couple of bad Rex plays – two interceptions and a fumble – but he put up major numbers with 322 passing yards and four touchdowns against the Cowboys. While some of those numbers were a result of a frenetic comeback attempt, Grossman is capable of putting up big numbers, and Redskins coaches have a vested interest in making him look good. So if you’re in a league without penalty points for turnovers, Grossman is a factor as a fill-in for an injured quarterback or a quarterback who sits after his team has clinched. Verdict: Applaud

Drew Stanton, Lions – Stanton threw for a season-high 252 yards against the Buccaneers with a touchdown, but he could lose his job to Shaun Hill next week. He’s not worth a claim. Verdict: A fraud

Tim Tebow, Broncos – Tebow’s first game as a starter featured his best-case scenario – a 40-yard touchdown run and 138 yards passing with a touchdown. Unfortunately, so much of Tebow’s value relies on running touchdowns that he’s not reliable for fantasy owners. You can’t put him in your lineup. Verdict: A fraud

Running backs

Cedric Benson, Bengals – Benson ran for 150 yards and a touchdown against the Browns, putting up the kind of game that made him valuable for fantasy owners in 2009. Unfortunately, those games have been too few and far between for Benson this year. Don’t get carried away and put Benson in your lineup over more reliable options. Verdict: A fraud

Maurice Morris, Lions – Morris had his best game of the season, running for 109 yards and a touchdown on 15 carries. He’s done a decent job producing, and he seems to be getting more looks than Jahvid Best at this point. If you need an emergency running back, Morris is worth a look in flex positions. Verdict: Applaud

Wide receivers

Anthony Armstrong and Santana Moss, Redskins – With Rex Grossman’s explosion, Armstrong had a 100-yard day, and Moss caught two TD passes against the Cowboys. While those numbers are inflated by the game situation, Grossman’s arrival has given both players a bit more value. Moss can be a No. 3 receiver, and Armstrong can be a flex. Verdict: Applaud

Vincent Jackson, Chargers – He’s back. Jackson had three touchdown catches Thursday night against the 49ers, which is a sign that he’s both healthy and in the offense enough to be an every-week starter for the two fantasy football weeks that remain. Put him in your lineup if you had stashed him on your roster. Verdict: Applaud

Jimmy Graham of the Saints

Tight ends

 

Ed Dickson, Ravens – Dickson, who has been filling in for the injured Todd Heap, had 33 receiving yards and a touchdown for the Ravens against the Saints. But with Heap nearing a return, Dickson isn’t a fantasy factor. Verdict: A fraud

Jimmy Graham, Saints – Graham had two TD catches against the Ravens, giving him three scores on the season. Graham has had at least three catches in five of six games, and he’s the tight end you want from the Saints right now, not Jeremy Shockey. Verdict: Applaud

Jason Witten, Cowboys – Witten had a monster game against the Redskins with 10 catches for 140 yards and a score. After a so-so first three quarters of the season, no fantasy tight end is putting up better numbers than Witten down the stretch. He needs to be in your lineup every week. Verdict: Applaud

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Fantasy Football Applaud or a Fraud Week 12

Each week, we sort through the box scores to determine what fantasy football performances we should applaud, and which are merely frauds. As always, we’ll give more details about what each verdict means as we break it down.

In our two game thoughts posts this week, we have already analyzed several players:
Check out the Thanksgiving leftovers post for thoughts on QB Shaun Hill, WR Brad Smith, and RBs Chris Ivory, Maurice Morris, and Felix Jones
Check out the Jaguars/Giants post for thoughts on QB David Garrard, RB Brandon Jacobs, and WR Mario Manningham

Jay Cutler against the Eagles

Quarterbacks

Sam Bradford, Rams – Bradford threw for 300 yards for the first time in his career and tacked on three touchdowns without an interception in the Rams’ win over the Broncos. However, fantasy owners should remember that the Broncos’ defense is one of the league’s worst, which means Bradford is a questionable play, especially away from home, going forward. Verdict: A fraud

Jay Cutler, Bears – Cutler had a nearly perfect game, throwing for 247 yards on just 21 attempts with four touchdowns and no interceptions against the Eagles. The Bears have trimmed the turnovers out of their offense in recent weeks, and Cutler seems to be doing a better job dealing with protection problems in front of him. He’s a borderline top 10 fantasy quarterback who deserves lineup consideration in fantasy leagues. Verdict: Applaud

Toby Gerhart

Running backs

Toby Gerhart, Vikings – When Adrian Peterson went down, Gerhart, a rookie out of Stanford, stepped up with 76 rushing yards and a touchdown on 22 carries. If Peterson misses a game, Gerhart is certainly worth a start in leagues of 10 teams or more. If Peterson is limited, then Gerhart would need to stay on your bench. Still, given Peterson’s uncertain status for Week 13, we’re clapping. Verdict: Applaud

Jonathan Stewart and Mike Goodson, Panthers – Stewart returned from injury and ran for 98 yards in the Panthers’ one-point loss to the Browns. But Goodson still got the start, and he totaled 136 yards from scrimmage and a touchdown. Our sense is that Goodson is now a flex play in leagues of 12 teams or more, while Stewart is a flex option only in leagues that are at least two teams bigger. It’ll be interesting to see if both players can remain effective going forward. We’d bet on Goodson over Stewart if forced to pick just one Panther. Verdict: Applaud for Goodson, A fraud for Stewart

Mike Tolbert, Chargers – Tolbert, who has been a scoring machine, had another touchdown with the Colts but perhaps more impressively rambled for 103 yards as well. Whenever Ryan Mathews is out, Tolbert is a must-start, and even if Mathews returns Tolbert can be a solid flex play because of his nose for the end zone. Verdict: Applaud

Jacoby Ford

Wide receivers

Earl Bennett, Bears – Bennett, Cutler’s old college teammate, caught two touchdowns against the Eagles. Bennett is behind Johnny Knox in the Chicago receiver pecking order, but he’s worth a pickup as a guy who can step up as an emergency fantasy contributor. Verdict: Applaud

Davone Bess, Dolphins – With Chad Henne returning to the lineup, Bess immediately returned to fantasy relevance with six catches for 111 yards. Whenever Henne is playing, Bess should be in your lineup. Verdict: Applaud

Jacoby Ford, Raiders– Ford, a rookie receiver out of Clemson, had a monster game against the Dolphins, catching four passes for 108 yards and a score, returning a kickoff 101 yards for a score, and rushing for 13 yards as a little bonus. Ford has now had 100-yard receiving games in two of three games and has two kickoff returns on the year. From watching a lot of Ford’s games in college, we can tell you he has sprinter speed but also football smarts and toughness, despite his slight size. He’s a player on the come, so grab him now and see just how good he can be. Verdict: Applaud

Jordy Nelson, Packers – The Donald Driver injury situation has opened the door for the Packers’ backup receivers to step up, and this week it was Nelson, not James Jones, that was the productive one. But Nelson’s 61-yard day, which included a touchdown, is not something you can expect every week simply because of the Pack’s deep list of options at the position. Verdict: A fraud

Ben Obamanu, Seahawks – With Mike Williams sidelined by injury, Obamanu had a huge game with five catches for 159 yards and a score. If Williams misses next week’s game, Obamanu is worth a start. Regardless, he should be picked up as a potential hot hand going into the fantasy playoffs. Verdict: Applaud

Tight ends

Billy Bajema, Rams – Bajema had two touchdowns against the Broncos, but he had just three total touchdowns. He remains behind Michael Hoomanawanui (who also had a TD catch) and Daniel Fells in the Rams’ tight end depth chart, and that means Bajema isn’t worth a claim. Verdict: A fraud

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November 29, 2010 · 5:36 pm

Thanksgiving Leftovers – Saints/Cowboys, Patriots/Lions, Jets/Bengals

Most weeks, we focus on one game and share our thoughts on it, both from an on-field perspective and a fantasy football perspective. But this week, we’re going to present our thoughts on all three Thanksgiving Day games. After we feature the Saints’ 30-27 victory over the Cowboys, the Patriots’ 45-24 win over the Lions, and the Jets’ 26-10 victory over the Bengals, we’ll throw in some Fantasy Football perspective for dessert.

Malcolm Jenkins (27) chases down Roy Williams to make the biggest play of the day. Via espn.com

 

Saints/Cowboys thoughts
*The premiere individual play of Thanksgiving Day was Malcom Jenkins’ forced fumble against Roy Williams late in the fourth quarter. Willams broke free in the secondary with the Cowboys’ leading by four, but Jenkins caught up and ripped the ball out to force a fumble that set up the Saints’ game-winning drive. While some outlets blasted Williams for a boneheaded play,Williams didn’t make a bad play; Jenkins made a great one. There’s an important difference.  So it’s hard to blast Williams for the loss.
*The Cowboys fell behind early 17-0 but rallied, which shows that Jason Garrett has added quite a bit of fight to a team that would have rolled over in that situation a month ago. Despite losing a fourth-quarter lead, that’s a good sign.
*While the Cowboys showed some fight, they had a bunch of mistakes – seven fumbles (even though only two were lost) and an interception. It’ll be interesting to see if Garrett and the coaching staff can eliminate mistakes down the stretch.
*The Saints won largely because they could make deep plays against the Cowboys’ struggling secondary. Devery Henderson’s 57-yard catch set up the first touchdown, and Robert Meachem’s 55-yard streak down the right sideline set up the game-winning score. Drew Brees threw beautiful passes in both situations, and without both plays, the Saints would have been sunk.

Wes Welker breaks free against the Lions. Via espn.com

 

Patriots/Lions thoughts
*The Patriots’ offense doesn’t miss Randy Moss at all. Tom Brady threw four TD passes, two each to Wes Welker and Deion Branch, in a complete dissection of Detroit’s mediocre secondary. And the Patriots’ running game looked good with BenJarvus Green-Ellis and Danny Woodhead. Those two runners, though unheralded, bring more punch and explosiveness than veterans Fred Taylor and Kevin Faulk did at the beginning of the year.
*I felt bad for former Wake Forest star Alphonso Smith, whom the Patriots absolutely abused throughout the game.  Smith, a former second-rounder, has been a nice addition for the Lions since they dealt a former seventh-rounder (Dan Gronkowski) for him before the season, but this game showed that Smith is a nickelback, not a starting corner.
*While the Patriots’ offense was strong, it was interesting to hear Brady talk after the game about how strong the Lions’ defensive line is. Rookie Ndamukong Suh was especially forceful, recording a sack and wreaking even more havoc. But it was Patriots CB Devin McCourty, not Suh, that was the best first-round rookie on the field. McCourty has developed into an asset for the Patriots’ defense. Now they just need to find a corner who can thrive across from him.
*The Lions went for a touchdown on fourth down (much like the Cowboys did against the Saints). It was the kind of decision that a playoff team can’t make, but for a team trying to establish an identity, we like the move. Jim Schwartz doesn’t have the defense he hopes to one day, but we like the team and the culture he’s building in Detroit.

Santonio Holmes, via espn.com

Jets/Bengals thoughts
*Brad Smith isn’t on the top 10 list of Jets you would expect to single-handedly win a game for the team, but he did just that against the Bengals. His 53-yard run and 89-yard punt return were the two biggest plays of the game. Smith is a niche player, but the Jets know that he can help them from time to time if given enough chances. He certainly did Thursday night.
*The Bengals’ offense just isn’t strong enough to hang with a solid team like the Jets. Carson Palmer threw for just 135 yards, and he threw two interceptions, including a key red-zone turnover in the second quarter. Given the targets Palmer has, he simply must do more to keep his team in games.
*The Jets did a good job defenisvely in the game, although they didn’t make a ton of big impact plays. If the Jets continue to get efforts like that one, they will get enough offense from their running game and the Mark Sanchez to Santonio Holmes combo to be solid playoff contenders.
*While there’s a lot to dislike about the Bengals, we’re bullish on the future of rookie WR Jordan Shipley, who had a TD in this game. Shipley is a Wes Welker type of player who should really make an impact for Cincy in future years. The other hat tip we have is for Bengals NT Domata Peko, who plays hard and makes an impact despite his low profile.

Fantasy Football perspective
*New Orleans RB Chris Ivory scored two touchdowns against the Cowboys, but he likely won’t be a fantasy factor as Reggie Bush starts to get reintegrated into the offense and Pierre Thomas returns. We hope you took advantage of Ivory’s role when he had it, because he won’t be much more than a short-yardage back (at best) going forward.
*Felix Jones had just 44 rushing yards for the Cowboys, but he also had seven catches for 69 yards. Since Jason Garrett took over, Jones has had at least 86 yards from scrimmage in each game. That makes him a fantasy flex play. However, the fact that the Cowboys continue to use Marion Barber and Tashard Choice over Jones on the goal line keeps Jones from being more of a factor.
*Jahvid Best was active but did not play for the Lions, which opened the door for Maurice Morris to score two touchdowns. It’s hard to rely on Best at this point given his injury problems, but Morris is the definition of a journeyman back. Don’t get too excited about his performance.
*With Matthew Stafford out, Shaun Hill remains a decent fantasy option. He threw for 285 yards and a touchdown in this game, and he’s good enough to take advantage of Detroit’s solid cadre of targets.
*While Brad Smith scored twice against the Bengals, he’s not a consistent enough producer to be worth a fantasy football roster spot.

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Fantasy Football Applaud or a Fraud – Week 15

Each week, we dive into the stat sheets to see which weekly performers fantasy owners should applaud and which fantasy owners should write off as frauds. You can read past applaud or a fraud analyses in the category listing. And you can also check out our fantasy football thoughts during the week via our Twitter feed here on the blog or here.

This week we’re going to focus purely on players who should be starting for your team in the fantasy playoffs. That’s a higher standard than we’ve traditionally had in this post, but at this point in the season it’s the info you need to know.

Quarterbacks

Matt Cassel, Chiefs – Yes, he had a big game this week (331 yards, two touchdowns). But it was against Cleveland. Just move on. Verdict: A fraud

Joe Flacco, Ravens – Flacco had a four-touchdown game in the Ravens’ 31-7 blowout of the Bears. But while that’s a solid effort, it comes against a bad defense. So don’t jump Flacco into starting status without looking closely at his opponent. Flacco is a matchup play, not a starter, at this point. Verdict: A fraud

David Garrard, Jaguars – Garrard threw for 223 yards and three touchdowns against the Colts, which is one of his better games of the year. But take it from someone who is stuck with Garrard as a starter in a 16-team league – fantasy owners can’t start him and feel great about it on a weekly basis. He’s just below starter caliber. Verdict: A fraud

Chad Henne, Dolphins – Henne threw for 349 yards in the Dolphins’ valiant comeback effort in Tennessee, but with just one touchdown and three interceptions he’s simply not starter worthy. He’s a top-20 fantasy quarterback this season, and projects to be even more next season, but for now you can’t start him and hope for a playoff win. Verdict: A fraud

Carson Palmer, Bengals – Palmer threw for 314 yards and two touchdowns against the Chargers, producing more than he has in recent weeks. With a game against the Chiefs next week, Palmer is back to solid starter status. Verdict: Applaud

Vince Young, Titans – Young threw for 236 yards and three touchdowns against the Dolphins, continuing his solid play of late. He’s a top-15 fantasy quarterback, which means he is a borderline fantasy starter in larger leagues. Don’t expect too much, but don’t be afraid to start Young going forward. Verdict: Applaud

Running backs

Marion Barber, Cowboys – Barber has been a disappointment for fantasy owners, in part because of injury, but he delivered 62 yards and two touchdowns against the Saints. While that doesn’t move Barber back into the realm of top-15 backs, but it does mean you can strongly consider starting Barber next week against the Redskins. Verdict: Applaud

Jerome Harrison, Browns – Harrison, who last week played second fiddle to Chris Jennings, this week had the third best rushing game in NFL history with 286 yards. He added three touchdowns just to make those who have claimed and dropped Harrison this year go a little crazier. But all this happened against a terrible Chiefs team, and that makes it hard to project Harrison rushing for a third as many yards next week. Take the chance on him if you want, but we think there are better options for you. Verdict: A fraud

Laurence Maroney, Patriots – Maroney has had inconsistent yardage totals this year, but he scored a touchdown this week against Buffalo (his first in three weeks) and added 83 rushing yards. He’s not a great starting option for fantasy owners, but at least he is an option. Verdict: Applaud

Maurice Morris, Lions – With Kevin Smith now gone for the season, Morris emerged with 126 rushing yards and a score against a pretty good Cardinals defense. If you’re desperate for a starting option, Morris is a gamble worth looking at. He’s still a long shot, but you’re not crazy if you start him going forward. Verdict: Applaud

Chris “Beanie” Wells, Cardinals – Wells had 110 rushing yards and a touchdown against the Lions this week. Normally, we tend to cast a skeptical eye toward performances against Detroit, but it’s worth noting that Wells has had both 70-plus rushing yards and at least one touchdown in four of his past six games. It looks like this rookie is coming on, and fantasy owners should try to ride the wave. Verdict: Applaud

Wide receivers

Chris Chambers, Chiefs – Even with Dwayne Bowe back in the lineup, Chambers had a nice game for the Chiefs with five catches for 114 yards and a score. While that came against the lowly Browns, it does indicate that Chambers still has fantasy value. Owners in leagues with 12 teams or less should stay away, but in larger leagues Chambers remains on the starting-lineup radar. That leads to this verdict. Verdict: Applaud

Braylon Edwards, Jets – Few big-name receivers have been as mediocre as Edwards, but he had five catches for 105 yards and a touchdown this week against Atlanta. With Mark Sanchez back, the Jets’ offense will be at least a smidge more potent, but that doesn’t mean Edwards is trustworthy for fantasy owners. He remains an enigma who you should try to bench if you have a better or even a comparable options. Verdict: A fraud

Justin Gage, Titans – Gage had two touchdowns against the Dolphins, but those were his only two catches. Look elsewhere for an emergency fantasy starter. Verdict: A fraud

Mike Sims-Walker, Jaguars – Few players are as all-or-nothing as Sims-Walker, and that makes him a maddening choice for fantasy owners each and every week. But he had six catches for 64 yards and a touchdown against the Colts this week, and he has 758 yards and six touchdowns on the season. So on the whole, he’s a fantasy starter. Verdict: Applaud

Tight ends

John Carlson, Seahawks – Carlson had a touchdown for the second straight week as he had seven catches for 86 yards against Tampa Bay. But that marked the first time in six games that Carlson had more than three catches. In other words, don’t count on Carlson to repeat this performance going forward. Verdict: A fraud

Todd Heap, Ravens – Heap was a go-to guy in the red zone for Baltimore Sunday, scoring twice among his five catches against the Bears. But that happened in a pass-happy game against a team that struggles against the pass and that has bad safeties and backup linebackers in the lineup. Don’t read too much into it. Verdict: A fraud

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Jersey Numbers: Running Backs

Over the next several weeks, we’re going to look at several different positions (I can’t yet promise all) to identify the best players wearing each jersey number at each position. If this goes as planned, we’ll then compile a list of the best player wearing each jersey number in the league.

If you have quibbles, or want to add someone I forgot, leave a comment and we’ll update this post. And please have patience – this is a big job.

We started this project with wide receivers in this post and then with tight ends in this post and quarterbacks in this post. Now we move to running backs, who wear numbers between 20 and 49.

20 – Thomas Jones, Jets – It was surprising to hear during this week’s Jets/Patriots game that Jones had moved into the top 30 of all-time NFL rushers. That’s an impressive accomplishment, especially for a guy who struggled as a top-10 overall pick in his first stop in Arizona. But in subsequent stops in Tampa Bay, Chicago, and now New York Jones has proven he can produce. He’s an easy choice here over young whippersnappers Steve Slaton of Houston and Darren McFadden of Oakland. Other notable 20: Justin Forsett, Seahawks

21 – LaDanian Tomlinson, Chargers – LDT is no longer the dominant force he was in his prime years, but if one of the top 10 backs of all time is playing in the league, we have to give him the number nod, even over a stud like Frank Gore of San Francisco or a long-time producer like Fred Taylor of the Patriots. Other notable 21s: Mike Bell, Saints; Ryan Moats, Texans; Javon Ringer, Titans; Melwede Moore, Steelers

22 – Matt Forte, Bears – Forte had an outstanding rookie year last year, but this year he’s been stymied by a subpar offensive line. Still, he gets the nod at this point over Julius Jones of the Seahawks and Fred Jackson of the Bills. Other notable 22s: Peyton Hillis, Broncos; Jacob Hester, Chargers; Chris Brown, Texans; Clifton Smith, Buccaneers

23 – Ronnie Brown, Dolphins – Before suffering a season-ending injury, Brown was continuing to prove himself as one of the league’s top-10 backs. Throw in the fact that he can throw it out of the Wildcat, and Brown gets the nod over Marshawn Lynch of the Bills and Pierre Thomas of the Saints. Other notable 23s: Willis McGahee, Ravens; Shonn Greene, Jets

24 – Marion Barber, Cowboys – Marion the Barbarian isn’t having a dominant year, but he’s still a really good back. We have no choice but to give him the nod over comeback story extraordinare Cadillac Williams of Tampa Bay.

25 – Ryan Grant, Packers – While Reggie Bush’s 25 is a best selling jersey not just in New Orleans but league wide, Grant has been the more consistently productive back over the past three years. So we’ll give Grant the nod over Bush. Other notable 25s: Justin Fargas, Raiders; LenDale White, Titans; Garrett Wolfe, Bears; Jamaal Charles, Chiefs

26 – Clinton Portis, Redskins – Although he’s sidelined by a concussion at the home, Portis’ long and productive career makes him an easy choice here over promising rookie Beanie Wells of Arizona.

27 – Ray Rice, Ravens – Brandon Jacobs of the Giants has a bigger profile, and Larry Johnson of the Bengals has a longer career, but Rice is the best back wearing this number right now. Rice is a threat running and receiving, and he can move the chains as well as bust the big play. So he gets the nod over Jacobs, Johnson, and rookie Knowshon Moreno of the Broncos.

28 – Adrian Peterson, Vikings – This is a close call, because Peterson and Chris Johnson of the Titans – probably the two best backs in the league – both wear the same number. We’ll stick to conventional wisdom and lean toward Peterson in this close call. Otehr notable 28s: Jonathan Stewart, Panthers, Correll Buckhalter, Broncos; Felix Jones, Cowboys; Derrick Ward, Buccaneers; Maurice Morris, Lions

29 – Joseph Addai, Colts – Addai isn’t a great back, but he’s good both as a runner and a receiver when he’s healthy. With Leon Washington of the Jets hurt, Addai is an easy choice at this number. Other notable 29s: LeSean McCoy, Eagles; Michael Bush, Raiders; Glen Coffee, 49ers, Chester Taylor, Vikings

30 – John Kuhn, Packers – Green Bay’s fullback is the only notable back currently wearing 30. Thankfully, he has gotten into the end zone often enough to make this selection look respectable.

31 – Jamal Lewis, Browns – Lewis isn’t the back he once was, but the former 2,000-yard rusher has had a terrific career. He’s the clear choice at this number over rookie Donald Brown of the Colts. Other notable 31s: Rock Cartwright, Redskins; Jason Wright, Cardinals

32 – Maurice Jones-Drew, Jaguars – Jones-Drew has moved seamlessly from being a part-time back to a full-time guy this year while still producing big numbers in terms of yardage and touchdowns. That gives him the nod over Cedric Benson, who is having a terrific season with the Bengals. Other notable 32: Jerious Norwood, Falcons

33 – Michael Turner, Falcons – The Burner has been incredibly productive since joining the Falcons in 2008, and that makes him the best back wearing 33 over pass-catching specialist Kevin Faulk of New England and short-yardage specialist LeRon McClain of Baltimore. Other notable 33: Justin Griffith, Seahawks

34 – Ricky Williams, Dolphins – Ricky wins the battle of the Williamses over DeAngelo Williams of Carolina based on Ricky’s longer career track record of production. Both are outstandingly talented backs. Other notable 34s: Rashard Mendenhall, Steelers; Kevin Smith, Lions; Tim Hightower, Cardinals; Ovie Mughelli, Falcons; Sammy Morris, Patriots

35 – Jerome Harrison, Browns – It’s slim pickings at this number, so we have to give the nod to Harrison, who has had a moment or two as Jamal Lewis’ backup. Other notable 35s: Owen Schmitt, Seahawks; Dan Kreider, Cardinals; Chad Simpson, Colts

36 – Brian Westbrook, Eagles – Westbrook, who has been a terrific multipurpose back for many years now, is the easy choice at this number. He’s a truly great player. Other notable 36: LaRod Stephens-Howling, Cardinals

37 – Jason McKie, Bears – McKie, the Bears’ fullback, gets the nod here over recent Bengals signee Fui Vakapuna, another fullback. Neither will make fans forget a great fullback wearing 37 – Larry Centers of the Cardinals.

38 – Samkon Gado, Rams – Gado has had a few moments in the league, so although he’s just a backup in St. Louis now, we opt for him over Vikings fullback Naufahu Tahi and injured Dolphins back Patrick Cobbs.

39 – Steven Jackson, Rams – Jackson plays for a terrible team, but he remains a terrific bellweather back for St. Louis. He gets the nod over the declining Willie Parker of Pittsburgh and the inconsistent Laurence Maroney of the Patriots. Other notable 39: Madison Hedgecock, Giants

40 – Brian Leonard, Bengals – As we get into the 40s, we’ll have a harder time finding backs wearing these numbers. Leonard, the Bengals’ do-everything back is the only notable runner wearing 40.

41 – Lorenzo Neal, Raiders – Neal has long been one of the league’s best blocking fullbacks, but his career is winding to a conclusion, which is why he’s bounced around in recent years.

42 – BenJarvus Green-Ellis, Patriots – The law firm, as Green-Ellis is called, has done a good job when called on by the Patriots. Other notable 42s: Tony Fiametta, Panthers; Mike Cox, Chiefs; DeShawn Wynn, Packers

43 – Darren Sproles, Chargers – Sproles, the mite-sized, dynamite-powered Chargers back, gets the nod here over underrated Eagles fullback Leonard Weaver.

44 – Ahmad Bradshaw, Giants – Bradshaw, once the speedy portion of the Giants’ RB trio, has emerged as the team’s best runner this season. He gets the nod over a batch of fullbacks here. Other notable 44s: Heath Evans, Saints; Luke Lawton, Raiders; Vonta Leach, Texans; Moran Norris, 49ers, Jason Snelling, Falcons; Mike Karney, Rams

45 – Mike Sellers, Redskins – In a batch of fullbacks, Washginton’s Sellers gets the nod because of his short-yardage acumen and special-teams impact. Other notable 45s: Ahmard Hall, Titans; Brad Hoover, Panthers; Jerome Felton, Lions

46 – Ladell Betts, Redskins – Betts is the only notable back wearing 46. Thankfully, he’s a solid player who has produced when he has gotten the chance to fill in for Clinton Portis.

47 – Lawrence Vickers, Browns – Vickers, a fullback, is the only notable NFL back wearing 47 right now.

48 – None – Poor Stephen Davis. (We went to the same high school.) No current back is making his former number 48 proud.

49 – Tony Richardson, Jets – Richardson has long been one of the league’s better fullbacks, and he now plies his trade with the Jets after stints in K.C. and Minnesota. He’s the only back currently wearing 49.

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Fantasy Football: Old running backs

As we continue our fantasy football coverage, we wanted to put the microscope on some of the older running backs available. Several long-time fantasy stalwarts either turned 30 before the season or will do so during the season. We’re going to compare these 30-plus backs via a Football Relativity poll, with 10 being the best of these backs and 1 being the fantasy irrelevants. We’ll make notes throughout the poll of how these levels compare on a full fantasy draft board.

One other note: We’ve covered some of these backs in former posts. For those backs, we have compared them on the scale and linked to what we’ve written about them previously. You can read all of our fantasy football coverage by going through the category listing for the blog.

10 – LaDanian Tomlinson, Chargers (age 30) – We discussed Tomlinson in this post on potential first-round running backs.

9 – Brian Westbrook, Eagles (age 30) – We discussed Westbrook in this post on potential first-round running backs.

*The players above this level are potential first-round picks and No. 1 running backs

8 – Thomas Jones, Jets (age 31) – Jones didn’t have more than 627 yards rushing in any of his first four seasons of the league, but he has been over 900 years since, including four straight years of at least 1,100 yards. Last year, he was a huge fantasy factor, rushing for 1,300 yards and scoring 15 total touchdowns. Jones did this even with Leon Washington around as a triple threat who took away some carries. The Jets will likely rely on Jones heavily again this season, given the fact that the Jets appear to be going with rookie Mark Sanchez as their starting quarterback. New York also drafted Shonn Greene, but the rookie from Iowa will likely be more of a factor in 2010 and beyond than this year. Washington and Jones both had some contractual issues this year, so Greene might have been an insurance policy against a holdout. Regardless, that leaves Jones as a tremendously reliable No. 2 running back in most leagues whom you can count on for 1,100 yards and at least 7 touchdowns as well. He’s just getting better with age.

7 – Larry Johnson, Chiefs (turns 30 in November) – I was down on Johnson last year, and he’s still a guy I’m a little hesitant on. But Johnson, despite missing four games last year, had 874 rushing yards and five touchdowns, which projects out to quality numbers for a No. 2 running back. Johnson is no longer a fantasy stud, but he’s still a factor. He’s worth a look around pick 40 in most drafts. (We also dealt with Johnson in this post.)

7 (con’t) – Jamal Lewis, Browns (age 30) – Lewis just barely broke the 1,000-yard barrier last year, and he only scored four touchdowns. But he seems to be holding up OK given his age and the pounding he has taken. Last year’s numbers are probably predictive of what he is now – he has averaged about 3.5 yards per carry in three of the past four years, but in those years he still has accumulated at least 900 yards. Moreover, the Browns still don’t have a replacement who can really challenge Lewis for carries. So while Lewis isn’t exciting, he’s still a borderline No. 2 fantasy back who is worth starter consideration in most leagues.

*The players above this line are every-week starters in most league formats

6 – none

– Sammy Morris, Patriots (age 32) – If you weren’t a Morris owner last year, you probably don’t realize that he had 700 yards and seven touchdowns. That’s great production for a No. 3 running back. This year, with Fred Taylor now around, you have to figure Morris’ numbers will go down. But we’d still take Morris ahead of Taylor or Laurence Maroney, and that makes Morris a solid backup option with starter potential in most fantasy leagues.

5 (con’t) – Chester Taylor, Vikings (turns 30 in September) – Taylor won’t get all that many carries with Adrian Peterson in town, but he is a quality back who makes the most of the carries and catches he does get. Last year he had 798 yards in 146 touches and tallied six total touchdowns. That makes Taylor a solid backup, and if Peterson ever gets hurt, Taylor immediately becomes a big-time fantasy starter.

4 – Correll Buckhalter, Broncos (age 30) – We discussed Buckhalter in this post on players on the move.

4 (con’t) – Fred Taylor, Patriots (age 33) – We discussed Taylor in this post on players on the move.

3 – Ricky Williams, Dolphins (age 32) – After two years with only one NFL game, Williams returned last year and proved that he can still play. He totalled 878 total yards and five touchdowns sharing time with Ronnie Brown. Some of those numbers will decrease this year, because the addition of rookie Pat White will take away some carries. But Williams will still do enough to be draftable in most fantasy leagues. A projection of 600 yards and four touchdowns is reasonable, and that’s not bad. Plus, if Ronnie Brown gets dinged up, Williams becomes a legitimate starting option. He’s still someone who needs to be in the top-100 on your draft board.

*The players above this line are draftable in most 10-to-12-team leagues. The players below this line are generally not draftable but are worth monitoring during the season.

2 – Maurice Morris, Lions (turns 30 in December) – We discussed Morris in this post on players on the move.

2 (con’t) – Dominic Rhodes, Bills (age 30) – We discussed Rhodes in this post on players on the move.

1 – Edgerrin James, free agent (age 31) – James got cut by the Cardinals and doesn’t currently have a job. If he does land a gig, the way he ran in the postseason shows he has some juice left. Watch the transactions list and be ready to add James to your draft board if he signs.

1 – Warrick Dunn, free agent (age 34) – Like James, Dunn was released in the offseason. But his numbers last year – 786 rushing yards with a 4.2 yards-per-carry average, along with 47 catches – show that he still has the legs to be relevant. So he’s a guy to remember if he signs somewhere before or even during the season.

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