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FR: May-June cuts

This post compares cuts NFL teams made during the month of May. For previous cuts, start at the April cuts post and work your way back.

10 – Raiders (cut QB JaMarcus Russell) – The Raiders finally admitted that Russell, a former No. 1 overall pick, that he has become one of the biggest draft busts of all time. Russell has a big arm, and he went through a couple of offensive systems under Lane Kiffin and then Tom Cable. But Russell also showed an inadequate work ethic, and his noticeable belly became a tell about that. Russell’s failure became obvious last year, when journeyman Bruce Gradkowski took over the offense and got much better results. This offseason, the Raiders finally moved on from Russell, chalking up the $39 million they paid him as a sunk cost and trading for Jason Campbell as a replacement. Campbell, a QB who’s at least league average, if not a tick better, represents a huge upgrade over the underachieving and undermotivated Russell. Now Russell must show he wants to resurrect his career by getting in good shape and playing as a backup somewhere. But given Russell’s track record, a team would have to be completely desperate at quarterback to give him a shot, and aside from Buffalo, few teams are that needy. So Russell’s next shot won’t come easily.

9 – none

8 – none

7 – Patriots (cut CB Shawn Springs) – Springs was released after he reportedly failed a physical, although the Patriots indicated they may bring him back later in the offseason. Springs has been a good corner in the league for a lot of years, but his time as a starter is waning. He’s better as a No. 3 corner or even a veteran backup who gets a lot of time off during the regular season but who is available when it counts. Of course, all that assumes he can get healthy, which is no given for someone with 13 seasons of tread already on the tires.

6 – Seahawks (cut RB LenDale White, S Quinton Teal, QB Mike Teel, and WR Reggie Williams) – White had two good years out of four in Tennessee, but the Titans tired of his weight problems and attitude issues and dealt him to Seattle during the draft to move up a few spots in the fourth and sixth rounds. That light price in itself was a sign, but it appeared that White would be able to live up to his potential with his former college coach Pete Carroll. But when White was flagged for violating the league’s substance-abuse policy, which will shelve him for the first four games of the season, the Seahawks decided White wasn’t worth the hassle and released him. White has talent, but if Carroll, under whom White thrived at USC, doesn’t see White as worth a roster spot, then it’s possible that no one else will either. White now faces a huge crossroads, and if he doesn’t dedicate himself to performing on the field, he could end up in the UFL instead of the NFL this fall. Teal came over to Seattle from Carolina earlier this offseason, but after Seattle re-signed Lawyer Milloy and drafted Earl Thomas, Teal become redundant there. Teel, a sixth-round pick last season, got caught up in the Seahawks’ regime change after Seattle brought in Charlie Whitehurst and J.P. Losman to back up Matt Hasselbeck. Teel still may have some developmental potential, but the Patriots cut him after taking a quick look via waivers. Williams, a former first-round pick in Jacksonville, got a second chance in Seattle but wasn’t able to even make it last until training camp.

5 – Saints (cut DE Bobby McCray) – After adding Alex Brown this offseason, the Saints decided McCray was expendable in a move that saved the team over a million dollars. McCray had six sacks as he started eight games and played all 16 for the Saints in 2008 but slipped to just one start and 1.5 sacks in 16 games last year. At this point, he’s not going to provide a ton of pass rush, but he’d be a good minimum-salary gamble for a team looking for a third end who could start in a pinch.

4 – Dolphins (cut LB Reggie Torbor) – Torbor, a six-year vet, has never been a full-time starter in the NFL, and the Dolphins decided to move toward a younger (and cheaper) option at their backup inside ‘backer position. Torbor landed in Buffalo to help the Bills install their new 3-4 defense.

4 (con’t) – Chargers (cut DT Ian Scott and S Kevin Ellison) – Scott played as a backup defensive tackle for the Chargers last year, but he’s been passed on the depth chart and is just a replacement-level player. Ellison started nine games as a rookie for the Chargers last year, but he fell out of favor. Still, Ellison is young enough to be a prospect elsewhere, and that elsewhere is Seattle.

3 – Texans (cut RB Ryan Moats) – Moats had one monster game for the Texans last year, but fumble problems cut his playing time short, and with the addition of rookie Ben Tate and the emergence of Arian Foster, plus Steve Slaton in place, Moats faced a fight for a roster spot. Moats is good enough that the Vikings claimed him off waivers to take a look, but he’s not a starting-quality NFL back.

3 (con’t) – Cowboys (cut C Cory Procter) – Procter, who backed up for the Cowboys at guard and center, was released in what appeared to be a cost-cutting move. Instead of paying Procter more than a million bucks, the ‘Pokes can use a first- or second-year guy in a backup role at about a third of the cost. Despite that, though, Procter is good enough that the Dolphins are giving him a look.

2 – Buccaneers (cut LB Angelo Crowell) – Crowell was once a productive linebacker in Buffalo, but he missed the last two years with injury. At this point, it’s uncertain whether Crowell is anywhere close health-wise to a starting-caliber player.

2 (con’t) – Titans (cut WR Mark Jones) – Jones had a couple of good years as a return specialist, but injuries shelved him last season and continue to be a problem.

1 – Browns (cut PK Shaun Suisham) – Cleveland signed Suisham to put pressure on kicker Phil Dawson, who’s a free agent. But Suisham isn’t a long-term option, and Dawson has apparently called Cleveland’s bluff. The contract issue lingers, but Suisham won’t.

1 (con’t) – Broncos (cut QB Tom Brandstater and OT Maurice Williams) – Brandstater, who last year looked like a quarterback prospect, lost his roster spot after the Broncos added Tim Tebow and Brady Quinn in the offseason. He was claimed on waivers by the Colts and will get a shot to make the roster there. Williams, an offseason signee, wasn’t able to provide the OT depth Denver had hoped.

1 (con’t) – Chiefs (cut RB Kolby Smith and QB Matt Gutierrez) – Smith showed some flashes in Kansas City, but he fell behind Jamaal Charles and Thomas Jones and became too expensive to be a third-stringer. He landed in Denver via waiver claim. Gutierrez knows the Patriot-ish system the Chiefs run but has never proved he’s better than a No. 3 quarterback.

1 (con’t) – Bengals (cut CB Keiwan Ratliff) – Ratliff has bounced around in recent years after starting his career with the Bengals, but he’s out of a job – likely because Adam Jones pac-manned up the last CB spot on the roster.

1 (con’t) – Redskins (cut TE Sean Ryan) – Ryan is a block-first tight end who has bounced around but who wasn’t going to pass Chris Cooley or Fred Davis.

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Week 7 moves

We do a weekly update on major NFL transactions. We include signings, releases, and also players who are put on injured reserve, because they are lost for the year. You can check out the Week 6 transactions here and work your way back through the season.

Additions

Broncos (add P Mitch Berger) – The Broncos made their first roster move of the regular season by cutting Brett Kern and replacing him with Berger, a veteran who is better at directional kicking than the strong-legged Kern was. Berger filled in for the Steelers last year and got a Super Bowl ring out of the deal, so he’s trying to cherry-pick again with a contender.

Titans (claim P Brett Kern off waivers from Denver, sign RB Alvin Pearman) – Kern wasn’t out of work long. He landed with the Titans, who dropped Reggie Hodges. Hodges had been brought in to replace the injured Craig Hentrich, but his gross average of 39.5 yards and his net average of 31.8 were both at the bottom of the league. Kern’s strong leg will be an upgrade, even if he’s not great directionally. Pearman’s signing was special-teams related as well. He’ll replace return specialist Mark Jones, who was placed on injured reserve after suffering a hamstring injury that would have sidelined him a month or more. Jones was brought in a few weeks back to stabilize the Titans’ return game after some costly fumbles, and Tennessee must hope Pearman can do the same. The Titans really miss Chris Carr, who left via free agency after last season to sign with Baltimore.

Subtractions

Jets (put RB Leon Washington on injured reserve) – Washington was a key part of the Jets’ attack as a returner, receiver, and runner, although his performance in ’09 didn’t match the standard he set in ’08. But Washington suffered a broken leg that will end his season. Rookie Shonn Greene replaces Washington on offense, and the Jets brought back CB Justin Miller to take Washington’s role as a returner. Miller, most recently with the Raiders, had some good moments in that role with the Jets especially in 2005 and 2006.

Dolphins (put CB Will Allen on injured reserve) – Allen suffered a torn ACL last week, and it will end his season. Now the Dolphins must rely on rookies Vontae Davis and Sean Smith to perform at cornerback if they are to have a solid pass defense.

Seahawks (put OT Walter Jones and LB Lofa Tatupu on injured reserve) – Jones hasn’t played this year because of a lingering knee injury, and the Seahawks finally gave up the ghost and put him on injured reserve. While the 2009 impact of this transaction isn’t significant, it is important because it could mark the end of a Hall of Fame career for Jones. Tatupu’s season-ending pectoral injury is far more important to the ’09 Seahawks. He is the playmaker and signal caller in the middle of the defense, and he’s now falling apart. With Tatupu and Leroy Hill out, the Seahawks LB corps has been gutted to the point that rookie Aaron Curry must become a big-time playmaker. This may speed Curry’s development a bit, but it won’t help the Hawks win this year.

49ers (put OT Tony Pashos on injured reserve) – Pashos joined the 49ers from Jacksonville in the offseason and became the team’s starting right tackle. But he suffered a fractured scapula and will have to miss the rest of the season. The 49ers can use Barry Sims to replace Pashos, or they can shuffle the line to move someone outside. They signed Chris Patrick off the Chiefs’ practice squad to take Pashos’ roster spot. The Niners also cut LB Marques Harris and promoted training-camp phenom Diyral Biggs from the practice squad.

Falcons (put rookie S William Moore on injured reserve) – Moore, the Falcons’ second-round pick, played in only two games before a hamstring injury ended his season. The Falcons’ top two draft picks, Moore and DT Peria Jerry, are now out for the season, limiting their development along with their ability to help a defense that was rebuilding. To replace Moore on the roster, Atlanta signed veteran RB Aaron Stecker, who will help provide depth with Jerious Norwood and Jason Snelling both banged up.

Eagles (put LB Omar Gaither on injured reserve) – Gaither started three games at middle linebacker for the Eagles early this season, but he got hurt two weeks ago vs. Oakland with a listfranc foot injury that will end his season. Will Witherspoon replaced him last week, and this week the Eagles put Gaither on IR. To replace Gaither on the roster, Philly signed RB P.J. Hill off the Saints’ practice squad as insurance against Brian Westbrook’s injury.

Saints (put FB Heath Evans on injured reserve) – Evans was a role player on the Saints’ offense at fullback, and he had three touchdowns in the first six games of the season. But a torn right ACL ends his season. To replace him, the Saints added journeyman fullback Kyle Eckel.

Buccaneers (cut OG Marcus Johnson) – Johnson, a backup guard for the Bucs, was released Tuesday after being arrested on charges of driving under the influence.

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Week 3 moves

We do a weekly update on major NFL transactions. We’ll include signings, releases, and also players who are put on injured reserve, because they are lost for the year. You can check out the Week 2 transactions here.

Additions

Dolphins (trade for QB Tyler Thigpen) – With Chad Pennington out for the year, the Dolphins needed some QB help. They traded for Thigpen, who showed potential last season but fell to the No. 3 spot in Kansas City this year. Thigpen has been running a similar Bill Parcells-inspired system in K.C. that he’ll run in Miami, which will help his transition into the No. 2 QB role. He also provides insurance in case Chad Henne shows he’s not going to be able to start in the league. The trade was for an undisclosed draft pick that may depend on how Thigpen plays or how much he plays.

Eagles (add LB Jeremiah Trotter) – Trotter, who played for the Eagles from 1998 to 2001 and from 2004 to 2006 and made four Pro Bowls in his two tenures, came back to his first team for a third time to try to help bolster a linebacker corps that is still trying to fill in for injured MLB Stewart Bradley. Trotter hasn’t played since 2007, which makes it unlikely that he’ll make much of a contribution, but this endgenders good will with the fan base and puts the other linebackers on notice. Both are minor positives.

Patriots (add DL Terdell Sands) – Sands got a big contract from the Raiders in the offseason, and then promptly got cut before the season. Now he’s nothing more than a rotation guy whom the Patriots hope will help to bolster the middle of their defense with Vince Wilfork hurting. Given the success the Pats have had with ex-Raiders, Sands is worth a shot. He can be a fill-in and could end up being more. To make room for Sands, the Patriots cut LB Prescott Burgess, whom they traded a late-round draft pick to get from Baltimore just last week.

Chiefs (add TE Leonard Pope) – Pope is a huge, physically gifted tight end who never reached his potential with the Cardinals even though he started many games. But his size can help in Kansas City, which has too few elite athletes on its roster. Pope may not make a huge splash, but he is undoubtedly an upgrade.

Panthers (add DT Hollis Thomas) – Thomas, who was cut by the Rams earlier in the week, lands in Carolina to help a team that has put three defensive tackles on IR so far this year. Thomas can make plays when in shape, but he’s not always in shape. Still, he’s a veteran and a body who can help, and Carolina is desperate right now.

Bears (add LB Darrell McClover) – Chicago, which is playing without Brian Urlacher and has injury issues with Hunter Hillenmeyer and Pisa Tinoisamoa (The Tower) right now, needed LB depth, so they brought back McClover, who knows the system and has performed adequately in the past.

Steelers (add RB Carey Davis) – After putting Frank Summers on IR, the Steelers brought back Carey Davis to fill in at the fullback position. A good performance from Davis would help a running game that is not on track right now.

Lions (add DT Chuck Darby) – Darby is a long-time veteran tackle who adds depth for the Lions. Detroit also cut CB Marcus McCauley and WR Yamon Figurs this week as they continue to try to upgrade the back half of their roster, which still is lacking compared to just about every other NFL team.

Subtractions

Dolphins (put QB Chad Pennington on IR) – Pennington hurt his throwing shoulder in Week 3 vs. San Diego and will miss the rest of the season. The injury is considered career-threatening given Pennington’s age and injury history. The Dolphins were already planning to give the keys to the offense to Chad Henne in 2010, so they’re moving that timetable up to try to replace Pennington now. But this injury severely damages the Dolphins’ flagging playoff hopes.

Eagles (cut QB Jeff Garcia) – Now that Michael Vick is eligible to play, Donovan McNabb is getting healthier, and Kevin Kolb has proven he can play at least a little, Garcia is an insurance policy the Eagles no longer need. He may hook on elsewhere as a backup or a fill-in, but his chances of starting are all but gone at this point.

Saints (put OT Jammal Brown on IR) – Brown isn’t well known, but he’s a two-time Pro Bowl left tackle who has protected Drew Brees’ blindside beautifully. But a training-camp hip injury slowed him, and the Saints pulled the plug and sidelined Brown for the season instead of waiting for his return. New Orleans brought back Nick Leckey, who was with the team the first two weeks, for depth, but Jermon Bushrod is the guy on the spot to try to replace Brown for the rest of the year.

Chiefs (cut LB Monty Beisel and Ricardo Colclough) – The Chiefs continue to churn their roster looking for better talent. Beisel and Colclough at this point are marginal veterans who weren’t going to be long-term solutions in K.C., and that made them expendable.

Rams (cut DT Hollis Thomas; put WR Laurent Robinson on IR) – Robinson, who was emerging as one of the Rams’ few positive surprises this season after coming over via trade from Atlanta, now is done for the year. That’s a big blow to St. Louis’ already punchless offense.

Titans (put P Craig Hentrich on IR, cut RB Chris Henry) – Hentrich, a long-time veteran, suffered a hip injury that may end up being career-ending. Henry was a second-round pick who never panned out, but the Titans are OK at running back because their first-round pick the next year – Chris Johnson – is an emerging star. To replace Hentrich and Henry, the Titans added veteran S Kevin Kaesviharn and returner Mark Jones. Jones could immediately replace Ryan Mouton, who had two incredibly costly muffs on return chances last week against the Jets.

Bills (put CB Leodis McKelvin on IR) – McKelvin, Buffalo’s ’08 first-rounder, was an emerging corner and a good returner despite his gaffe at the end of the opener against the Patriots. But his season was ended by a broken fibula.

Raiders (put CB John Bowie on IR) – Normally, a player like Bowie, who has played five games in three seasons, wouldn’t merit a mention. But because Bowie was acquired with the draft pick the Raiders got in exchange for Randy Moss, this transaction seems to be a greater statement on the continued organizational failings of the Raiders.

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Training Camp Moves – Last week

This post is a compilation of additions NFL teams made during the fourth full week of camps. The timetable for this post opens on September 4 and continues through the regular-season opener on September 10. You can read a summary of the first week of training camp moves here; the second week moves here; the third week moves here; the fourth week of moves here; the fifth week of moves here; and the sixth week of moves here. Because moves will be coming fast and furious throughout training camp, we’re going to use quick analysis of moves each week during this time instead of creating a massive Football Relativity comparison.

Additions

Raiders (add DE Richard Seymour) – There are plenty of thoughts on the trade for Seymour in this post.

Broncos (add DE Vonnie Holliday) – Holliday, a 12-year veteran who played for Miami the last four years, signed to provide solid DL play for Denver and its new 3-4 defense. Holliday is a solid player who can anchor against the run but won’t provide much pass rush. Still, he’ll be an asset because he fits the new defense much better than most of the returning personnel in Denver does.

Seahawks (add S Lawyer Milloy) – Milloy, the long-time Patriot who played for Atlanta most recently, returns to his hometown to play for the Seahawks. He has basically been a full-time starter for 13 years in the NFL now, but he’ll have to beat out Jordan Babineaux for the free safety job in Seattle. Still, at the least he’ll provide pressure that makes Babineaux better, and his veteran influence will be an asset as well.

Jaguars (add OG Kynan Forney and S Brian Russell) – Given the massive offensive line injuries that doomed their season last year, it makes sense for them to add a veteran like Forney for insurance. Forney has started before, but he fits better as a backup in Jacksonville. Russell isn’t great, but he can play corner or safety at an average level, which makes him a solid backup.

49ers (add OT Tony Pashos) – Pashos was sent to the bench in Jacksonville by the additions of Tra Thomas, Eben Britton, and Eugene Monroe, and he chose to be released instead of taking a pay cut. He landed in San Francisco, where he’ll have a chance to start at right tackle after Marvel Smith retired during training camp.

Patriots (add OG Kendall Simmons) – Simmons, a long-time Steeler, provides depth for New England’s interior line. He basically replaces Russ Hochstein, who was traded for Denver for a draft pick, on the roster.

Eagles (add TE Alex Smith) – The Eagles let veteran L.J. Smith leave as a free agent in the offseason, so it makes sense that they grabbed Alex Smith after he was cut by the Patriots. Alex Smith is a good pass rusher who provides a nice complement and insurance policy behind new starter Brent Celek.

Falcons (add CB Brian Williams) – Atlanta has spent much of training camp looking for secondary help. They traded for CB Tye Hill and then signed Williams, a veteran who has good size but not great speed. If one of these two shots pays off for the Falcons, they’ll be very happy because they’ve met a real need.

Vikings (add WR Greg Lewis) – Lewis is an inconsistent deep threat who lost out to Joey Galloway for a roster spot in New England after going there in a trade from Philly. But Minnesota thought that Lewis’ deep speed was a better fit for them than the possession game of Bobby Wade, whom the team released. Lewis is ideal as a No. 4 receiver and can be a No. 3, because he’s capable of making huge plays but also capable of dropping his share of balls and then some.

Cardinals (add OG Jeremy Bridges) – Arizona cut Elton Brown and replaced him with Bridges, who is a good interior player who has had trouble staying out of trouble off the field. Still, he provides a nice backup if he behaves.

Jets (add TE Ben Hartsock) – Hartsock, the Falcons’ starting tight end last year, lost his spot in the ATL to Tony Gonzalez. He now moves to New York, where he will be the No. 2 tight end behind Dustin Keller. The Jets have been shuffling tight ends all offseason looking for stability in that spot, so Hartsock is a good find for them.

Subtractions

Raiders (cut QB Jeff Garcia) – Oakland signed Garcia to be its backup QB, which was a bad idea because Garcia has always refused to accept a backup role. That became obvious to Oakland, and Garcia’s performance wasn’t good enough to make them overlook his personality. This release will end up benefiting JaMarcus Russell in the end.

Bills (cut OT Langston Walker and RB Dominic Rhodes) – The Bills have had a lot of offensive upheaval late in training camp, and it continued in making the roster. Walker was starting at right tackle, but he’s not in good shape, and the Bills decided to go with rookie Demetrius Bell instead. Rhodes was slated to be the Bills’ backup running back in the first three weeks with Marshawn Lynch suspended, but he didn’t perform well enough to merit a roster spot.

Rams (cut LB Chris Draft) – Draft was expected to be a starter at outside linebacker for the Rams this year, but the Rams released him right before the season in what looks like a move to keep his salary from becoming guaranteed. Draft is a solid linebacker who is the definition of average. He has proven that he won’t hurt a team, but he won’t make many big plays either. Don’t be surprised if the Rams try to bring him back after Week One, but Draft may choose to move to a better team as a backup or injury fill-in.

Giants (cut WR David Tyree) – Tyree, one of the big heroes of the Giants’ Super Bowl 42 win, was released after he fell behind New York’s cadre of young receivers (like Mario Manningham, Hakeem Nicks, and Ramses Barden). Tyree missed the entire season last year with injury, and so he might not be healthy enough to be a big contributor anywhere else. But he’s a veteran and a good special-teams player, so he could end up being a nice midseason addition somewhere before long.

Vikings (cut WR Bobby Wade) – Wade had 50 catches in each of the last two years in Minnesota, but with Sidney Rice healthy and Bernard Berrian arrived, Wade became too expensive for his production. He was cut just before the season because his salary would have been guaranteed for the year on Sunday. He’s good enough to play elsewhere, but it won’t be for anything near the money he was slated to make in Minny this year.

Packers (cut QB Brian Brohm) – Brohm was a second-round pick just two years ago, but his performance has been so bad that he was beaten out for the backup job by Matt Flynn, just a seventh-round pick that same year, and then was cut. He cleared waivers and landed on the practice squad, which means no other team thought he was worth a flier. That’s a huge fall for a guy once considered a nice prospect.

Patriots (cut QB Andrew Walter) – Walter, the former Raider, came over to New England early in training camp, and it looked as if he would be the No. 2 QB there after the Pats cut ’08 draft pick Kevin O’Connell. But Walter too was beaten out by undrafted rookie Brian Hoyer, who seized the backup job and played well enough that New England will keep just two QBs to start the season.

Eagles (cut QB A.J. Feeley) – The ultimate loser in the Michael Vick experiment in Philly was Feeley, who has proven he can be a solid backup but got caught in a roster crunch. He should land elsewhere as a No. 2 quarterback at some point, because he’s better than many teams’ backups.

Chiefs (cut S Bernard Pollard, C Eric Ghiaciuc, OT Damion McIntosh, and CB Travis Daniels) – Pollard started all year last year, famously hitting Tom Brady’s knee in the first game, but he lost his starting job to Mike Brown and eventually lost his roster spot. Ghiaciuc came over from Cincinnati to compete for the Chiefs’ starting center job, but he obviously didn’t get the job done. McIntosh is a nine-year vet who started 31 games for the Chiefs the last two years, but he too lost not only his starting gig but his job with K.C.’s new regime. Daniels, a former Dolphin who played for Cleveland last year, couldn’t hook on to continue his career.

Titans (cut WR-RS Mark Jones) – Jones had a good year in Carolina as a return specialist last year, and Tennessee gave him a small signing bonus to fill the same role there this year. But Jones can’t really play elsewhere, and the Titans decided to let rookie Kenny Britt contribute on returns, which made Jones expendable. He’ll end up somewhere else, at least for a look, given his ’08 success.

Bears (cut CB Rod Hood) – Hood, cut by Cleveland just days ago, latched on in Chicago but didn’t look good enough there to stick around. He could still get another look during the season, but being released multiple times must be a shock after starting for a Super Bowl team last year.

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FR: Free agency weekly review pt. 3

Another week, and a bunch more moves on the NFL landscape. Here’s a review of the moves from March 14-20 in comparison to each other. The 10 level is reserved for the team that made the most important signings of the week; the 1 level is reserved for a team that’s merely worth mentioning this week. Click on the following links for comparisons of the opening weekend, week 1, and week 2 moves.

10 – Saints (add S Darren Sharper, DE Paul Spicer and C Nick Leckey; kept WR-RS Courtney Roby) – The Saints still have major secondary needs, so Sharper’s leadership and veteran wiles are vital. He’s the NFL’s active leader in interceptions with 54. Spicer, who spent 10 years with the Jaguars, still can be a spot pass rusher and is worth a 1-year deal. Leckey started 10 games in Arizona last year and can fit in on the line. Roby fits in as a return option for New Orleans.

9 – Browns (add OT John St. Clair, LB Eric Barton, OG Floyd Womack, CB Corey Ivy, and RB Noah Herron) – St. Clair is a former first-round bust in St. Louis who emerged as a decent right tackle in Chicago. He got a deal worth $9 million over three years to be the bookend to stud OLT Joe Thomas. Barton has lost not just one but a few steps, but he knows Eric Mangini’s defense and may still be able to play at least on running downs. Womack, who has one of the league’s greatest nicknames — Pork Chop — played both guard and tackle in his nine years in Seattle. He’s an ideal 6th lineman who can also start and do OK. Ivy was Baltimore’s nickel back last year, and he played well in that role. He should fill a similar role in Cleveland.

8 – Ravens (add TE L.J. Smith and CB-RS Chris Carr) – Smith had a bad year in Philadelphia in ’08, largely because of injury, but he’s a dangerous pass catcher when healthy. The Ravens hope having either Todd Heap or Smith healthy will give them a middle-of-the-field threat. At $1.5 million for one year, Smith is kind of a pricy insurance policy. Carr is an underrated player who really emerged in Tennessee last year. He’s a dynamic returner, and he proved he could also contribute as a nickel back for the Titans. Given the overhaul the Ravens are doing at cornerback, Carr could be a very important player for them. He looks to fit in behind Dominique Foxworth (another addition) and Fabian Washington as Baltimore’s No. 3 corner.

7 – Patriots (add WR Joey Galloway and OL Al Johnson; kept DE Mike Wright, OT Wesley Britt and S Tank Williams) – Galloway was ineffective last year because of injury, but he was quietly dangerous in Tampa Bay in the two seasons before that. He’s a veteran who could fit in beautifully as an outside receiver opposite Randy Moss and beside Wes Welker, but Galloway will have to beat out Greg Lewis for that spot. In any case, the Patriots have improved their depth at receiver. Johnson is an interior lineman who was in Miami last year. Wright is a rotation defensive end who got a 4-year, $7.2 million deal to remain in New England.

6 – Raiders (add OT Khalif Barnes; kept C Chris Morris) – Barnes only got a one-year deal to move to the bay from Jacksonville, which is why this move isn’t higher. But he’s a talented player who is still trying to prove he can be an elite left tackle in the NFL. He’ll be a certain starter in Oakland.

5 – Cardinals (add RB Jason Wright, NT Rodney Leslie, TE Anthony Becht, and C Donovan Raiola; kept OLB Clark Haggans, DE Bertrand Berry and OG Elton Brown) – Wright, who got 2 years and $2 million on his new deal, replaces J.J. Arrington as Arizona’s third-down back. That’s the proper role for him. Leslie is a wide load who can play nose tackle as the Cards move to a 3-4 defense. He probably should be a backup and not a starter, but he’s a good option to have around. Becht is a block-first tight end who provides insurance in case Stephen Spach can’t return from his playoff knee injury. Haggans and Berry got one-year deals to stick around. Berry is a good citizen and team leader who can still get to the passer on occasion. Haggans played in Pittsburgh for eight years and should be an asset as the Cardinals seek to move to a 3-4 defense modeled after the Steelers’ D. Brown has started in the past but is more of a backup type.

5 (con’t) – Buccaneers (add LB Angelo Crowell) – Crowell missed the entire ’08 season with injury but was a productive linebacker in Buffalo before then. He’s vital in helping the Bucs replace ousted outside ‘backers Derrick Brooks and Cato June.

5 (con’t) – Chiefs (add LB Monty Beisel and WRs Bobby Engram and Terrance Copper) – Engram fits in as a possession receiver across from Dwayne Bowe, who is emerging as a quality No. 1 receiver. Engram didn’t do much last year because of injury, but he had a great ’07 season. Copper, meanwhile, will probably fit in more on special teams than on offense. Beisel will help new defensive coordinator Clancy Pendergast install his new offense. Beisel was a Chief from ’01 to ’04 but spent last season in Arizona with Pendergast and new head coach Todd Haley. This is another offseason move dedicated to getting a veteran hand who can help install and teach a new system.

4 – Redskins (add DE Renaldo Wynn; kept PK Shaun Suisham) – Wynn, a Redskin from ’02 to ’06, returns from the Giants on a one-year deal to provide defensive line depth.

3 – Titans (add WR-RS Mark Jones) – Jones moves from Carolina to replace Chris Carr as Tennessee’s primary returner. Jones brought more juice to the Panthers’ return game last year than Carolina had seen since Steve Smith was in that role, so he’ll help in Tennessee.

3 (con’t) – Eagles (add FB Leonard Weaver) – Weaver is the prototypical West Coast offense fullback. He can block pretty well, catch the ball a little, and run short-yardage plays in a pinch. He was actually on the field for more than 50 percent of Seattle’s offensive snaps last year, but with Mike Holmgren retiring, the offense was going to change enough to limit Weaver’s touches. He’ll step in and be a solid complement to Brian Westbrook in Philly, and he’ll make a play or two along the way as well. Weaver is a role player well worth a 1-year, $1.75 million deal.

2- Vikings (add CB Karl Paymah and WR-RS Glenn Holt) – Paymah moves from Denver on a one-year, $1.55 million deal to contribute as a backup corner and a special-teams dynamo. Holt will help on special teams too; he’s a quality returner who will keep the Vikings from having to use Bernard Berrian in that position.

2 (con’t) – Jets (add Marques Douglas; kept S Abram Elam and CB Ahmad Carroll) – Douglas is another ex-Raven who can play defensive end in new head coach Rex Ryan’s system. He’ll be a backup who plays in a rotation. The Jets kept Elam by matching a 1-year, $1.5 million offer sheet he had signed with Cleveland. Elam can backup both safety spots, and he played well last year. Carroll is a former first-round pick who might have finally found a home after latching on with the Jets last year.

1 – Bills (add LB Pat Thomas) – With Angelo Crowell leaving, the Bills needed to add a veteran linebacker who could start. Thomas opened nine games last year in Kansas City, so he fits that bill.

1 (con’t) – Packers (kept CB Jarrett Bush and DE Mike Montgomery) – The Packers matched an offer sheet from the Titans to keep Bush, but it’s strange to picture them paying $4.5 million over three years for a backup corner. Bush will need to at least be a nickel back for this contract to make sense for Green Bay. Montgomery was a backup defensive tackle last year, but he’ll likely become an end in the Packers’ new 3-4 scheme.

1 (con’t) – Broncos (add OG Scott Young; kept TE Jeb Putzier) – Young was a backup with Philadelphia and should fill a similar role in Denver. Putzier could be an important retention because the Broncos are shopping pass-catching TE Tony Scheffler. Putzier can catch OK but is more of a blocker, which will be more important in the new offense that rookie head coach Josh McDaniels is installing.

1 (con’t) Lions (add TE Will Heller) – Heller’s a block-first tight end who will help the running game but won’t catch much at all. He comes from Seattle to replace John Owens, who went from Detroit to Seattle.

1 (con’t) – Steelers (kept OG Trai Essex, CB Fernando Bryant and LB Arnold Harrison) – Bryant is an established vet who didn’t play much after signing in Pittsburgh in the middle of last season. The hope is that, with training camp under his belt, he can serve as an effective backup. Essex signed a two-year deal, which is important because so many Steelers linemen are still free agents.

Seahawks (kept LB D.D. Lewis) – backup and special teamer

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