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Week 4 Transactions

Denver Broncos receiver Brandon Stokley, 14, g...

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Each week we share insights, analysis, and opinions of the week’s transactions. To see previous posts, click here and start working back. 

Jets (signed DT Trevor Pryce, cut DT Howard Green) – We discussed the Pryce move in this post. To make room for him, the Jets cut Green, whom they signed after Kris Jenkins’ injury.

Ravens (cut Pryce, re-sign S Ken Hamlin) – We discussed the price of Pryce (and Hamlin) in this post.

Jaguars (claimed QB Trent Edwards) – The Jaguars, who lost Luke McCown to injury earlier this year, claimed Edwards off waivers after Buffalo released him. Edwards immediately becomes the most solid backup option Jacksonville has, and if David Garrard continues to struggle, Edwards could get a few starts to see if he fits in Jax.

Bills (sign QB Levi Brown) – After cutting Edwards, the Bills brought back Brown, their seventh-round pick out of Troy this season. He’ll become the No. 3 quarterback behind Ryan Fitzpatrick and Brian Brohm.

Seahawks (add WR Brandon Stokley, cut RB Quinton Ganther and OG Chester Pitts) – Stokley (pictured), who played for the Broncos last year, can fill in as a slot-type receiver. The Seahawks are playing a bunch of wideouts now but haven’t developed consistently reliable options, so Stokely could help.

Patriots (add RB Thomas Clayton, cut OG Quinn Ojinnaka) – With Fred Taylor hurting, Kevin Faulk out for the year, and Laurence Maroney in Denver, the Pats added RB depth with Clayton. They cut Ojinnaka, whom they acquired in a training-camp trade with the Falcons.

Texans (add CB Karl Paymah) – Paymah, who has bounced around to Minnesota and Denver in recent years, is a speedy and kind of tall corner who isn’t great but is good enough to be a No. 4. He adds depth to one of Houston’s big problem areas.

Colts (add LB Tyjuan Hagler, cut TE Gijon Robinson) – Hagler returns to Indy to help fill in after injuries to Clint Session and Kavell Connor.

Saints (add PK John Carney) – With Garrett Hartley struggling in two of three games this year, the Saints brought back Carney, who is 46 but should be reliable from 40 yards and in. They kept Hartley, who still has a chance to develop as a top-flight NFL kicker, but it’s clear they don’t have confidence in him right now.

Lions (add CB Dante Wesley, cut S Randy Phillips) – Detroit brought back Wesley, a cornerback who’s a big asset on special teams.

Panthers (add C Chris Morris, cut DT Louis Leonard) – The Panthers cut Leonard, whom they traded for last year, in part because he had been passed by Nick Hayden and Derek Landri. His roster spot went to Morris, who adds depth to an offensive line that had little.

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The Pryce is wrong for Ravens

Pryce

The NFL transaction wire got interesting Thursday when the Jets swooped in and signed DT Trevor Pryce, who had been released by Baltimore early in the week. The Ravens assumed they could bring Pryce back later this season, and he didn’t even bother to pack up his locker anticipating a return. The Ravens actually cut Pryce to bring back S Ken Hamlin in a similar role, and the Steelers (Baltimore’s Week 4 opponent) executed the same strategy with Byron Leftwich earlier this year. But Pryce’s $2 million 2010 contract with Baltimore was guaranteed because he’s a vested veteran, so when the Jets swooped in with an offer, he had the chance to make double money for the rest of the season, and that proved too juicy a proposition to pass up.

 

It’s a blow to the Ravens, who lost backup DEs Justin Bannan and Dwan Edwards via free agency in the offseason. Pryce didn’t start any of the first three games of the season, as Cory Redding came to town and started, but Pryce is still a solid 3-4 defensive end who can hold up against the run and provide some pass-rush punch. Losing him as depth hurts the Ravens, and losing him to the AFC-rival Jets hurts even more. Thet Jets can use Pryce at end so that Sione Pouha can move inside to team with Mike DeVito on the nose to replace the injured Kris Jenkins.

While the Ravens may be irate at what Pryce for choosing to leave (and Michael Lombardi thinks they should be), they’re the ones that took the risk. They’re the ones who put Pryce on the open market. To put it bluntly, they’re the ones that fired him, whether or not they intended to bring him back. You can’t blame Pryce for pursuing double payment for the year, especially when he’s 35 and in the twilight of his career. And the Jets are a natural landing spot for Pryce since he played under Rex Ryan in Baltimore and knows new teammates like Bart Scott and Jim Leonhard. It’s a coup for the Jets, and they deserve credit for swooping in when Pryce hit the market.

As it ends up, the price of the Pryce roster gamble ended up being much higher than the Ravens expected.

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Week 3 Transactions

New England Patriots running back Kevin Faulk

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Each week we share insights, analysis, and opinions of the week’s transactions. To see previous posts, click here and start working back. There are a ton of RB moves this week, so we’ll feature those first and then add other positions below.

RB transactions

Falcons (put RB Jerious Norwood on injured reserve, sign RB Gartrell Johnson) – Norwood, the Falcons’ third-down back, suffered a torn ACL against the Cardinals and will miss the rest of the season. Jason Snelling, Michael Turner’s backup, is a quality second back, so Norwood’s loss isn’t as devastating as it could have been. Johnson, an ex-Giant, provides depth behind Snelling.

Saints (sign RB Ladell Betts, cut RB DeShawn Wynn) – Wynn beat out Betts in training camp for a roster spot with the Saints because Wynn is more useful on special teams. But after Reggie Bush suffered a knee injury that will cost him six weeks or so, the Saints brought back Betts, who’s the better runner. He’ll back up Pierre Thomas.

Redskins (cut RB Larry Johnson, sign RB Chad Simpson) – Johnson, a free agent signee in the offseason, never got up to speed with the Redskins, and so Washington finally cut the declining back. Simpson is a smaller back who adds return skills as a backup.

Patriots (put RB Kevin Faulk on injured reserve) – Faulk (pictured above) suffered a catastrophic knee injury in Week 2 vs. the Jets and will miss the season. The Pats have a deep stable of backs, but none of them has the versatility that Faulk, the ultimate third-down back, brought.

Eagles (add RB Joique Bell) – While cutting Hank Baskett (see below), the Eagles added Bell from the Bills’ practice squad.

Other transactions

Texans (add OT Ephraim Salaam) – After Duane Brown’s suspension, the Texans brought back Salaam for tackle depth. Salaam hasn’t started since 2007, but he knows the Texans’ system and provides veteran depth in case Rashad Butler can’t hold up.

Ravens (cut S Ken Hamlin) – The Ravens brought in Hamlin to help provide depth in Ed Reed’s absence, but Hamlin’s performance has really dropped off from his Seattle and Dallas days. With CB Cary Williams coming back from suspension, the Ravens decided Hamlin wasn’t worth a roster spot anymore.

Vikings (add WR Hank Baskett) – Baskett, cut by Philadelphia earlier in the week, goes to Minnesota as a big, lanky receiver. Baskett doesn’t have great speed, but at least he’s a big target who helps fill in for Sidney Rice and Percy Harvin, who’s again fighting migraines.

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FR: June signings

This post compares free-agent signings during the month of June. For past signings, go to the May signings post and work your way back.

10 – Raiders (add DT John Henderson) – Henderson was a salary-saving cut by the Jaguars, and he’s not the player he was at his Pro Bowl peak. But Henderson can still be a force inside, and at the worst he’s an upgrade over ’09 Raiders starter Gerard Warren. Henderson, like Richard Seymour last year, is an older player who can bring quality to a Raiders defense that isn’t bad. Plus, Henderson will help protect ’10 first-rounder Rolando McClain, which is a wise move as well. This is a nice late signing by the Raiders, who have had a solid offseason.

9 – Ravens (add UFA PK Shayne Graham, S Ken Hamlin, QB Marc Bulger, and UFA CB Walt Harris) – Graham had some great years with the Bengals, but last year wasn’t one of them, and the Bengals looked for a cheaper option. So Graham moves to Baltimore, where he figures to beat out Billy Cundiff at a spot that was a problem for the Ravens last year. Hamlin was a Pro Bowl participant just three seasons ago in Dallas, but his lack of range showed up over the last two years, and his play fell off to a level far below his contract. What Hamlin can still do is hit – he had 74 tackles last year and can still play as an in-the-box safety. But relying on him in coverage at this point will burn a team. In Baltimore, Ed Reed handles the backfield brilliantly, which makes a guy like Hamlin an acceptable safety counterpart. Maybe Hamlin finds the fountain of youth in Baltimore, but if he doesn’t, he can still help in a limited role. He’s still worth a shot for Baltimore on a one-year deal. Bulger was once a franchise quarterback in St. Louis, but years of playing behind a terrible offensive line sapped his effectiveness, led to injuries, and scuttled his starting career. So after posting three consecutive years with a 90-plus passer rating, Bulger has been pretty bad in recent years with his rating staying below 72. That’s a massive drop. The Rams have moved on to Sam Bradford, and now Bulger moves on to Baltimore. The Ravens are a good fit for Bulger because they have a solid offensive line and a top-flight running game, which means that if Bulger has to replace Joe Flacco, he’s set up to succeed. For the Ravens, meanwhile, Bulger provides a professional quarterback who’s just 33 and can be more of a long-term fill-in than Troy Smith at this point. This is a win-now move at $2.3 million that may not have been possible if not for the uncapped year. The signing of Harris is a similar transaction. Harris missed all of last season after an offseason injury, but before that he was a starter for some pretty good San Francisco defenses. Harris will be 36 when the season opens, but his more physical style can work in the right system. For a Ravens team that has really struggled at cornerback in recent years, Harris is the kind of veteran who may help younger players develop and who could even contribute on the field if the system makes up for his age-related shortcomings.

8 – Rams (keep UFA S O.J. Atogwe, add DT Chris Hovan) – Atogwe didn’t have his best season last year, which made restricted free agency a little dicey for the Rams and their former franchise player. But Atogwe is still a plus player for the Rams as he forces plenty of turnovers and makes big plays. Maybe the Rams would prefer Atogwe be more consistent, but his aggressiveness is still a benefit for a team bereft of playmakers. Keeping him once they had to let his restricted free-agent tender lapse was something the Rams needed to do to continue moving forward. Hovan hasn’t been a dominant player since his early days in Minnesota, but he’s still a starting-quality tackle who may be revived under Steve Spagnuolo, who had great success with defensive lines coaching the Giants. Hovan started all but one game over the last six seasons in Tampa, so at the least he’s a guy a rebuilding team can depend on to be there.

7 – none

6 – Chargers (add UFA WR Josh Reed, UFA TE Randy McMichael and OT Tra Thomas) – Both Reed and Thomas are solid pros, but neither is more than a fill-in at this point in his career. Thomas lost playing time to rookie Eugene Monroe in Jacksonville last year, but his years of experience at left tackle in Philadelphia are what San Diego’s looking at. If starting OLT Marcus McNeill holds out, Thomas has the know-how to be a stopgap option. But Thomas, who never was a dancer out on the edge, has lost mobility as he’s gotten older and could be exploited by speed rushers. Reed was a slot receiver in Buffalo, and while he can catch the ball reliably, he won’t break many plays. But if star WR Vincent Jackson holds out, San Diego needed some veterans who could at least run the right patterns, and Reed fills that bill. The more interesting things about both signings is not what these players bring but what it says about the Chargers’ hard-line stance against Jackson and McNeill. McMichael never lived up to his potential as a game-changing pass-catcher, but he’s been somewhat productive, and so he becomes a solid backup to Antonio Gates. He’s the kind of luxury bench signing a contender like the Chargers need to make.

5 – Bills (add LB Reggie Torbor) – Torbor got caught in a numbers game in Miami, but he’s a nice addition at inside linebacker for a Bills defense trying to move to a 3-4 this year. Like previous signee Andra Davis, Torbor does his job and tackles well. Neither Davis nor Torbor is a great player, but they’re good enough to provide stability until the Bills get playmakers in their linebacker corps.

4 – Seahawks (add S Kevin Ellison) – Ellison started nine games as a rookie for San Diego last year, but he was a surpising June cut by the Bolts. Seattle snapped him up quickly, first claiming him on waivers and then cutting him so that they could sign him to a new contract. If Ellison is going to succeed, Seattle’s a great place, since the former USC product is playing for his college head coach Pete Carroll.

3 – Redskins (add UFA Mike Furrey) – Furrey is perhaps the only two-way player in the league right now, as he can contribute at safety or wide receiver. It’s at wideout that the Redskins need help, since Santana Moss could be facing a league suspension stemming from his connection to Dr. Anthony Galea. Furrey has had one huge catch season, but he’s primarily a slot receiver who runs good routes and has good quickness. He can help the Redskins in three- or four-WR sets.

2 – Vikings (add RB Ryan Moats via waivers) – Moats had his moments in Houston last year, and he played for Vikings head man Brad Childress back in Philadelphia. So when Adrian Peterson started sitting out of minicamps, the Vikes didn’t hesitate to take the opportunity to claim Moats. Moats’ pass-catching acumen could mean that he gets some shots over rookie Toby Gerhardt in replacing Chester Taylor.

1 – Saints (add OG Terrence Metcalf) – Metcalf was out of the league last year, but he had a seven-year career with the Bears and could fit in as a backup guard.

1 (con’t) – Steelers (add LB Matt Stewart) – Stewart didn’t play last season, but as a starter in four of his six NFL seasons with Atlanta and Cleveland, he could provide depth at inside linebacker for the Steelers.

1 (con’t) – Broncos (add UFA FB Kyle Eckel and RB Kolby Smith via waivers) – Eckel is a borderline fullback who played for Josh McDaniels in New England. That’s the reason he has a shot to make Denver’s roster as a fullback, especially after Peyton Hillis left via trade. Smith has shown a few flashes in Kansas City, which makes him worth a waiver claim.

1 (con’t) – Colts (add QB Tom Brandstater via waivers) – Brandstater, once a prospect in Denver, got claimed on waivers by the Colts, who need to develop a backup to Peyton Manning now that Jim Sorgi is gone. Brandstater will compete with fellow ’09 rookie Curtis Painter for that spot, and only one of them will likely make the team.

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Baltimore’s bargain bin

A few weeks ago, we posted on the Ravens’ signing of veteran FS Ken Hamlin to a one-year deal. Well, the Ravens have continued the trend of signing veterans as one-year insurance policies by adding QB Marc Bulger and CB Walt Harris. Here are some thoughts on those moves; you can see how they compare to other June signings later this week.

Bulger was once a franchise quarterback in St. Louis, but years of playing behind a terrible offensive line sapped his effectiveness, led to injuries, and scuttled his starting career. So after posting three consecutive years with a 90-plus passer rating, Bulger has been pretty bad in recent years with his rating staying below 72. That’s a massive drop. The Rams have moved on to Sam Bradford, and now Bulger moves on to Baltimore. The Ravens are a good fit for Bulger because they have a solid offensive line and a top-flight running game, which means that if Bulger has to replace Joe Flacco, he’s set up to succeed. For the Ravens, meanwhile, Bulger provides a professional quarterback who’s just 33 and can be more of a long-term fill-in than Troy Smith at this point. This is a win-now move at $2.3 million that may not have been possible if not for the uncapped year.

The signing of Harris is a similar transaction. Harris missed all of last season after an offseason injury, but before that he was a starter for some pretty good San Francisco defenses. Harris will be 36 when the season opens, but his more physical style can work in the right system. For a Ravens team that has really struggled at cornerback in recent years, Harris is the kind of veteran who may help younger players develop and who could even contribute on the field if the system makes up for his age-related shortcomings.

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Hamlin’s new home

The Baltimore Ravens added a former Pro Bowler Thursday by signing S Ken Hamlin. Below are some thoughts on the move; you can see how the addition compares to others in the month of June in an upcoming post.

Hamlin was a Pro Bowl participant just three seasons ago in Dallas, but his lack of range showed up over the last two years, and his play fell off to a level far below his contract. What Hamlin can still do is hit – he had 74 tackles last year and can still play as an in-the-box safety. But relying on him in coverage at this point will burn a team. In Baltimore, Ed Reed handles the backfield brilliantly, which makes a guy like Hamlin an acceptable safety counterpart. Maybe Hamlin finds the fountain of youth in Baltimore, but if he doesn’t, he can still help in a limited role. He’s still worth a shot for Baltimore on a one-year deal.

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Who’s rebuilding, who’s reloading? NFC edition

As the NFL draft wound down, and I tried to get Mel Kiper’s voice out of my head, I had an idea – let’s evaluate which NFL teams are rebuilding and which are reloading, and whether each team is taking the right approach. Here’s the NFC edition; click here for the AFC edition.

NFC East

Dallas is reloading – After their first playoff win in nearly 15 years, the Cowboys kept the band together for the most part. They cut OT Flozell Adams and S Ken Hamlin, but both players had hit steep declines. The draft class starred Dez Bryant, who will add a receiving weapon for an offense that emerged last year, and ILB Sean Lee, who could plug in if Keith Brooking starts to struggle. The Cowboys believe their time is now, and last year’s results were good enough that such a strategy is sound. Verdict: Right approach

New York Giants are reloading – The Giants started to fall off the table last year, both on defense and on the offensive line. But instead of starting a major overhaul, the Giants are trying a patchwork approach. The biggest changes are at safety, where C.C. Brown is out, and Antrel Rolle and Deon Grant are in. First-round DE Jason Pierre-Paul is a developmental prospect who should spice up a pass rush that struggled last year, and second-round DT Linval Joseph shores up the interior. It seems like the Giants’ team that won the Super Bowl is getting old, though, and we have to wonder if more aggressive changes were in order. Verdict: Wrong approach

Philadelphia is rebuilding – The Eagles, despite making the playoffs again last year, went on a major rebuilding effort in the offseason in an effort to set themselves up not just for 2010 but for the first half of the new decade. So Kevin Kolb replaces Donovan McNabb, LeSean McCoy and Mike Bell replace Brian Westbrook, and LB Ernie Sims and DE Darryl Tapp add to a defense that gave up CB Sheldon Brown and LB Will Witherspoon. Then the draft added a ton of players like DE Brandon Graham and S Nate Allen who could develop into building blocks. This is rebuidling on the fly, and the Eagles seem to be doing it well. While it may lead to a slight step back this season, it sets them up to continue being a model franchise. Verdict: Right approach

Washington is rebuilding – Now that the Mike Shanahan era has begun, the Redskins are doing a full overhaul on the roster. QB Donovan McNabb is the marquee signing, but guys like DT Maake Kemeoatu and OG Artis Hicks are significant as well. Washington didn’t have a ton of draft picks, but OT Trent Williams should become a building block. The Redskins added a bunch of veterans to try to speed the rebuilding process, especially on offense, and time will tell if that’s the right approach, but Washington needed change on offense badly. Verdict: Right approach 

NFC North

Chicago is reloading – The Bears were hamstrung into their reloading strategy by a couple of factors. First, Lovie Smith is on the hot seat, and so he needs to win now. Also, last year’s Jay Cutler and Gaines Adams trades took Chicago’s first two draft picks and forced them into the free-agent market for most of their help. Drafted S Major Wright could help immediately, but the big help will come from imports DE Julius Peppers and RB Chester Taylor. Given the situation the Bears had entering the season, they took the only tack they could. Verdict: Right approach

Detroit is rebuilding – The Lions continued to tinker with the back end of the roster and strategically add key pieces. In free agency, they brought in Kyle Vanden Bosch and Nate Burleson to help Ndamukong Suh and Matthew Stafford thrive. That strategy is no coincidence. Jahvid Best and Tony Scheffler also become offensive weapons who should make life easier for Stafford. Detroit has really upgraded its roster over the past few years, and while they’re still behind, respectability is on the horizon. Verdict: Right approach

Green Bay is reloading – The Packers continued their build-through-the-draft strategy, which means that they’re always adding players around the edges and keeping the core intact. The Packers again this year don’t have any significant free-agent additions, so it’s up to draftees Bryan Bulaga, Mike Neal, and Morgan Burnett to provide a talent infusion. But because the Packers have built so well through the draft for so long, this strategy can now sustain itself. Verdict: Right approach

Minnesota is reloading – The Vikings haven’t gotten much help through free agency, aside from CB Lito Sheppard, but this final-four team was close enough that a few tweaks could be enough. The Vikes had better hope this is true, because a draft class headlined by Chris Cook isn’t exciting, although Toby Gerhart and Everson Griffen could find roles. Verdict: Right approach

NFC South

Atlanta is reloading – The Falcons made one of the big strikes of free agency by adding CB Dunta Robinson, who addresses a position of need for a team coming off back-to-back winning seasons for the first time. First-round LB Sean Witherspoon adds a jolt to the defense as well. Those additions, combined with the fact that Atlanta hasn’t lost any significant players, will keep the Falcons in the hunt. Verdict: Right approach

Carolina is rebuilding – While the Falcons haven’t lost that much, Carolina purged a ton of veterans – losing Julius Peppers in free agency, trading Chris Harris, and cutting longtime stalwarts Jake Delhomme, Maake Kemeoatu, Na’il Diggs, Damione Lewis, and Brad Hoover. Carolina is going young, which also means going cheap. So Matt Moore and Jimmy Clausen will battle at quarterback, and the defensive line will look completely different. The Panthers played well after a slow start, and so this step back hurts fans, but it’s better to rebuild a year early than a year late. Verdict: Right approach

New Orleans is reloading – The Super Bowl champs are trying to get back, and so they added Alex Brown to replace the disappointing Charles Grant and re-signed Darren Sharper to another one-year deal. They lose some important players like Mike Bell, Jamar Nesbit, and Scott Fujita, but none of those were core players, and that means the Saints should be in the mix yet again. Verdict: Right approach

Tampa Bay is rebuilding – The Buccaneers need a ton of help, and they’re aware of those needs. The draft brought DT help in Gerald McCoy and Bryan Price and WR help in Arrelious Benn and Mike Williams. That’s not all the help the Bucs needed, but those two positions are now in development, as is quarterback with ’09 first-rounder Josh Freeman. The Bucs still have several more trouble spots to address, but at least they’re checking a few spots off the to-do-list. Verdict: Right approach

NFC West

Arizona is rebuilding – The Cardinals are coming off back-to-back playoff appearances, but they’ve undergone a pretty significant roster change this offseason. Gone are stars Kurt Warner, Anquan Boldin, Karlos Dansby, and Antrel Rolle. In are QB Derek Anderson, who will compete with Matt Leinart, and OGs Alan Faneca and Rex Hadnot, who will help the Cards move toward more of a run-first approach. On defense, rookies Dan Williams and Daryl Washington provide reinforcements. Arizona is trying to remake its image further, and it’s necessary with Warner’s quick release now in retirement. Verdict: Right approach

St. Louis is rebuilding – The Rams are in the midst of serious roster overhaul, and first overall pick Sam Bradford is at the center of it. To help Bradford, fellow rookies Rodger Saffold and Mardy Gilyard come aboard as well. In free agency, the Rams mainly played around the margins with guys like Na’il Diggs, Hank Fraley, and Fred Robbins, hoping these vets can keep them competitive as they develop younger talent. As bad as the roster was in St. Louis, rebuilding wasn’t a choice – it was a necessity. Verdict: Right approach

San Francisco is reloading – Mike Singletary has kept the Niners on the fringe of contention lately, and now the Niners are going for the jugular. First-round OTs Anthony Davis and Mike Iupati add the kind of physical nastiness that Singletary wants from his line, while Taylor Mays and Navarro Bowman add speed to the defense. Free-agent signee Travis LaBoy and trade acquisition Ted Ginn Jr. are the kinds of role players a team on the verge likes to add to keep moving forward. Alex Smith will have to come through for this to be the right approach for San Francisco, but we can understand why the Niners are making their bets this way. Verdict: Right approach

Seattle is rebuilding The Seahawks seemed to get old suddenly over the past two years, and new head coach Pete Carroll has been incredibly proactive in trying to reverse that trend. Rookies Golden Tate, Earl Thomas, and Russell Okung could all start immediately, as the Seahawks try to replace the departed Nate Burleson, Deon Grant, and the retired Walter Jones. Most of all, the Seahawks tried to set up their future at quarterback by paying handsomely for Chargers third-stringer Charlie Whitehurst. It remains to be seen whether the Seahawks have picked the right guys in their rebuilding project, but for now we can at least give them credit for having a clear picture of just how bad the roster was. Verdict: Right approach

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