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Week 9 Transactions

Red Bryant Heads Off the Field

Image by Bernzilla via Flickr

Each week we share insights, analysis, and opinions of the week’s transactions. To see previous posts, click here and start working back. 

For thoughts on the two big transactions of the week – Buffalo’s waiver claim of LB Shawne Merriman and Tennessee’s claim of WR Randy Moss – check out this post from earlier in the week.

Seahawks (put DE Red Bryant and C Ben Hamilton on IR; cut RB Quinton Ganther and S Nate Ness; add DT Frank Okam, DE Jay Richardson, WR Ruvell Martin, and C Chris White) – The Seahawks lost two starters to injury in Bryant, who has a knee injury, and Hamilton, who has a concussion. (Bryant is pictured above.) Both are key losses for a team that’s fighting for the NFC West title. Finding Okam, who played five games for the Texans this year, was a plus, and Richardson has three years experience in Oakland. Both guys should be good enough to plug into the rotation on the front four. Martin has been a Packer and Ram, and he plays special teams as well. Ness was immediately claimed by the Dolphins.

Chargers (put WR Buster Davis on IR, add WR Kelley Washington) – Davis, a former first-round pick, is the latest in a line of Chargers wideouts to be sidelined. Malcom Floyd and Legedu Naanee are currently out, and it appears TE Antonio Gates will miss time as well. San Diego still has several weeks to wait before Vincent Jackson makes it back from his suspension, so Patrick Crayton, Washington (most recently with the Eagles), and Seyi Ajirotutu will have to hold down the fort for now.

Buccaneers (put DT Bryan Price on IR, add DT Al Woods) – Price, the Buccaneers’ second-round pick this season, hadn’t broken into the starting lineup, but he was one of the youngsters who really added play-making ability to a defense that’s coming around. A pelvis injury now sidelines him for the rest of the season. He’s replaced by Woods, whom the Bucs took off the Steelers’ practice squad. Woods could be a nice developmental prospect.

49ers (put C Eric Heitmann on IR) – Heitmann, who has been the 49ers starting center in previous years, had not yet played this year because of a neck injury and a broken fibula. The Niners tried to wait on his return but decided this week to cut the cord for this season.

Texans (cut DE Adewale Ogunleye) – The Texans have brought in several veteran defensive ends this year, but they decided Ogunleye wasn’t performing up to snuff. So they released him and promoted Tim Jamison from the practice squad.

Panthers (claim LB Jason Williams) – Williams, a third-round pick in 2009, lost his job in Dallas, but the Panthers immediately claimed the Western Illinois prospect to see if he can develop there. Even though Williams has played just 10 career games, he’s still a better bet to develop than retread Abdul Hodge, whom the Panthers cut after just one week on the roster.

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FR: Training camp signings

NFL teams see needs surface during training camp, and players who need a job try to capitalize by coming in late to win roster spots. This post comments on training-camp signings through August 19. For signings earlier in the offseason, go to the pre-camp signings post and work your way back. Signings later in the preseason will be covered in a subsequent post.

Jets (add WR Laveranues Coles) – Coles returns for a third tour of duty with the Jets after a single disappointing season in Cincinnati. Coles’ main role with the Jets will be to fill in for Santonio Holmes during his four-game suspension to start the season. Coles won’t produce like Holmes will, but he provides a veteran balance to Braylon Edwards and Jerricho Cotchery in the first month of the season.

Broncos (add RBs LenDale White and Justin Fargas) – White, who had some good years with the Titans, blew his chance with his old college coach Pete Carroll in Seattle, and he faces a four-game suspension to start the season. But the Broncos, who lost Knowshon Moreno and Correll Buckhalter to training-camp injuries and traded away J.J. Arrington, needed a professional running back during camp and turned to White. He may just be a camp body, but if he shows promise, the Broncos might keep him around. Fargas, though, is a better bet to stick around. Although he’s now 30, Fargas still has the ability to be a decent performer if given an opportunity, and he has fewer miles on his tires than other backs his age. It’s entirely possible that Fargas could even usurp Buckhalter as Moreno’s backup. The fact that Fargas won’t miss four games to start the season also gives him an edge over White in terms of making the opening-day roster.

49ers (add RB Brian Westbrook) – The 49ers responded to the retirement of Glen Coffee by signing Westbrook as Frank Gore’s backup. Westbrook had a dynamic eight-year career in Philadelphia, producing big numbers as a runner and receiver and proving to be a team-first, smart guy. The problem with Westbrook was his durability. He missed games in every year of his Eagles career, and that durability is one of the reasons the Eagles moved on. Because San Francisco relies on Gore so heavily, Westbrook will have a limited role, and that may enable him to last throughout the season in San Fran. For a 49ers team trying to move into the playoffs again, Westbrook is a worthwhile investment as a role player.

Titans (add DL Raheem Brock) – Brock is a versatile lineman who can hold up outside or serve as a pass-rusher inside at defensive tackle. Plus, he comes from the Colts, so he’ll bring some insight to town for the division-rival Titans. At age 32, Brock doesn’t have a lot left, but he’s probably still good enough to fill a reserve role for a contender like the Titans.

Saints (add RB Ladell Betts) – The Saints responded to Lynell Hamilton’s season-ending injury by adding ex-Redskin Betts as their No. 3 back. Betts spent his first nine years in Washington, and although he was a lead back in just one year, he proved his value as a versatile back who can block and catch in addition to run. He steps in for Hamilton in the role that Mike Bell had last year for New Orleans as Pierre Thomas’ counterpart and short-yardage specialist. Betts may not be the thumper that Bell was, but he’s good enough to allow the Saints to keep Thomas fresh, and that’s all they could hope for with a mid-August replacement.

Eagles (add UFA WR Kelley Washington) – Washington, who has stuck in the league for seven seasons as a big, rangy special-teams guy, actually showed some skill as a receiver last year with a career-high 34 catches. Now he moves from Baltimore to Philly, where he will be the fourth receiver and fill the role that Hank Baskett dropped last year. That’s an upgrade for the Eagles.

Colts (add UFA CB DeShea Townsend) – Townsend has played 12 years, all with the Steelers, and he remains a solid No. 3 or No. 4 corner. The Steelers didn’t want Townsend back, but he’ll be a nice veteran presence for the Colts’ young corner group.

Seahawks (add DT Quinn Pitcock and LB Tyjuan Hagler) – Pitcock played one year with the Colts after being a third-round pick in 2007, but he retired. He said the reasons were depression and a video-game addiction, both of which made him less than excited to play football. But the former Ohio State player says he’s excited about football again, and the Seahawks hope he can recapture the potential he showed as a collegian and a rookie. It’s worth a low-cost shot for the club. Hagler spent the last five years with the Colts, starting 17 games over the last three years. He adds depth in case Leroy Hill’s off-field problems sideline him for an extender period of time.

Dolphins (add OG Randy Thomas) – Thomas only played two games last year, but he’s been a long-time starter with the Redskins and the Jets before that. He’s near the end of the line, but he’s probably still good enough to start if Miami gets in a pinch inside. He’s a nice depth addition in mid-August.

Chargers (add S Quinton Teal) – Teal, who played the first three years of his career in Carolina, lands in San Diego after an offseason stop in Seattle. Teal is a replacement-level safety who adds depth to the Chargers’ backfield.

Saints (add WR Mark Bradley) – New Orleans has a deep corps of wide receivers, but they still decided to add Bradley, who played for Kansas City and Tampa Bay last year. Bradley has never lived up to his potential as a second-round pick in Chicago, but he’s a professional receiver who could be a No. 5 for someone – though probably not the receiver-rich Saints.

Patriots (add OG Eric Ghiaciuc) – Ghiaciuc, a three-year starter in Cincinnati, has bounced around the past several years, but he could still add depth for the Patriots up front, especially with Logan Mankins holding out.

Bears (add QB Matt Gutierrez) – Gutierrez, the former Patriots third-stringer who was with Kansas City last year, comes on board to try to beat out rookie Dan LeFevour for the backup QB job behind Jay Cutler.

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Colts/Ravens thoughts

In honor of a vacation week spent partly in Baltimore, we share a few thoughts on the Week 11 game between the Colts and Ravens, both from an on-field perspective and a fantasy football perspective. Indianapolis stayed undefeated by scratching out a 17-15 victory in Baltimore. This was the sixth win by four points or less this season for the 10-0 Colts, and their fourth in a row by that kind of margin. Meanwhile, the 5-5 Ravens lost by less than a touchdown for the fourth time this season.

On-field perspective
*Two pregame thoughts. First, Sports Illustrated’s Ross Tucker had a nice historical tweet just before kickoff. He said: Scoreboard here in Baltimore says “Ravens 0 INDY 0”. They still don’t recognize the “Colts” after all these years. Funny.
*Meanwhile, while I was in Baltimore this week, the hand-wringing was all about PK Matt Stover’s return to Baltimore as a Colt after so many years with the Ravens. The fact that Stover returned the same week the Ravens had to cut his replacement Steven Hauschka because of inconsistency only magnified how dependable Stover had been. No wonder the Ravens’ faithful went crazy when replacement Billy Cundiff narrowly made a 46-yard field goal in the first quarter. Cundiff hit 5-of-6 field goal attempts in the game, but the one he missed proved incredibly costly.
*Dallas Clark’s touchdown catch early in the first quarter was an incredible display of concentration and hand strength. Catching the ball by palming it in your right hand with no other support on the ball, and tapping your toes in the end zone in the process, was something that not many other receivers could do. What a play.
*Kelley Washington has been a nice find for the Ravens this year. He’s terrific on special teams, and he’s emerged as a solid No. 3 receiver as well.
*Young Colts DBs Tim Jennings, Melvin Bullitt, and Jacob Lacey all made nice plays on the ball in the first quarter. That’s a good sign for a team trying to overcome injuries to Bob Sanders, Marlin Jackson, and Kelvin Hayden.
*DE Haloti Ngata makes a huge difference for the Ravens’ defense. He busted up a fourth-down play at the end of the first quarter causing a penalty and a punt, and he makes that kind of impact regularly. He may well be the best player on that defense, and I’d argue that the Ravens need Ngata more than Terrell Suggs, who missed this game with an injury.
*The Ravens’ offense is much more intimidating when Ray Rice is in the game than when Willis McGahee is. Rice provides the opportunity for special plays, and McGahee simply can’t. It’s not that McGahee is a bad back, because he’s OK. Rice, meanwhile, is a big-play threat as a runner and a receiver. LeRon McClain, meanwhile, looks slow and tentative – nothing like the power back he was last year.
*The Colts have really restocked their playmaking ability with rookies Austin Collie and Donald Brown, along with first-year player Pierre Garcon and second-year tight end Tom Santi, who stepped up in this game. That shot of youth is vital with Marvin Harrison gone and Joseph Addai getting more banged up by the day.
*The Ravens did a good job of making plays on the ball vs. Peyton Manning after the first drive, and safeties Ed Reed and Dawan Landry both got interceptions. Reed and Landry make for a strong pair up the middle in the secondary.
*Joe Flacco isn’t the machine that Peyton Manning is, but he showed on the two-minute drill at the end of the first half that he’s a big-time quarterback. Flacco is allowing the Ravens to develop offensively as a new kind of team, and the downfield throw out of his own end zone in the third quarter was a beauty. But you could see the difference in Flacco’s inconsistency on third down, which forced the Ravens to settle for four first-half field goals. And the pick Flacco threw in the fourth quarter was more egregious than either of the interceptions Manning threw in this game.
*The Colts’ front 7 isn’t big, and the only way they could generate a ton of pressure was to send a huge blitz against Flacco. That’s something that some team is going to exploit before the end of the season. Dwight Freeney and Robert Mathis weren’t able to generate a ton of pressure on their own against young and huge Ravens OTs Michael Oher and Jared Gaither. For the Colts, Gary Brackett not only had a pick – he had the most impact on that front seven throughout the game. He’s such a solid player for Indy.
*Ravens head coach John Harbaugh did a great job of managing his replay challenges until late in the fourth quarter. He went 2-for-2 on challenges – both of which were ultra-close and therefore worth challenging regarding the outcome – and more importantly avoided a challenge that would have failed in the second quarter. That decision to pick up the red flag saved the Ravens a timeout and probably three points in the first half and 22 yards on a successful challenge in the second half. But when Harbaugh called timeout and then challenged a spot late in the fourth quarter, he cost his team its final timeout and about 40 seconds toward a last-gasp comeback.
*Reggie Wayne is one of the top five receivers in the league. He’s so good catching the ball that you’re surprised when he doesn’t come up with it. His dominance allows youngsters like Garcon and Collie to make plays in spaces much bigger than usual.

Fantasy football perspective
*Dallas Clark isn’t just the best fantasy tight end available; he’s one of the top 15 receivers of any kind in the league. No other tight end comes close to matching his production, because no tight end is as vital a part of his offense as Clark is for Indy.
*Pierre Garcon, who had a 100-yard game, has gone back ahead of Austin Collie as the Colts’ No. 2 wide receiver, mainly because he’s more prone to bust a big play. Garcon is much like Mike Wallace of Pittsburgh in that he’s going to get 2-3 shots at a huge play each week, and if he makes one of those plays, he can help your fantasy team. Garcon isn’t as valuable as some teams’ No. 2 wideouts because of the Dallas Clark factor, but he is a top-35 receiver who can spot start as long as Anthony Gonzalez’s injury continues to linger.
*Colts TE Tom Santi hadn’t had a catch all season, but he had six in this game for the Colts, including a 31-yarder. Santi must have been playing a bigger role in this game because of a matchup the Colts saw that made a two-TE set advantageous. But fantasy owners shouldn’t rely too much on Santi going forward. The Colts don’t use two-TE sets regularly enough to make Santi ownable in any league, despite his 80-yard effort in this game. The fact that Santi fumbled once in the end zone and dropped another possible touchdown won’t add to the young tight end’s chances going forward.
*Joseph Addai scored a rushing touchdown in this game, and he has at least 60 yards per scrimmage in every game but one this season. So while he feels like an unreliable fantasy back, his numbers have been good enough to put him inside the top 20 at the position. He’s a fantasy starter, but he’s not a dominant force.
*Ray Rice is just a yardage machine. He’s so good as a runner and receiver that he’s going to pile up 120-150 yards in just about any game. And if he breaks a big play or scores a touchdown, he puts up elite fantasy numbers. He’s become a dependable top-10 fantasy back.
*Derrick Mason is old for a wide receiver, but he continues to produce solid fantasy numbers as the Ravens’ unquestioned No. 1 wideout. He had more than 100 yards in this game, passing the century mark for just the second time this season. But he has had at least 78 yards in five of 10 games, which makes him a solid top-25 wideout. He’s not cemented as a starter, but he’s a nice option to have around.

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Jersey Numbers: Wide Receivers

Over the next several weeks, we’re going to look at several different positions (I can’t yet promise all) to identify the best players wearing each jersey number at each position. If this goes as planned, we’ll then compile a list of the best player wearing each jersey number in the league.

If you have quibbles, or want to add someone I forgot, leave a comment and we’ll update this post. And please have patience – this is a big job.

We’ll start in this post with the best wide receivers at each jersey number. In general, wideouts are allowed to wear numbers between 10 and 19 as well as between 80 and 89.

10 – Santonio Holmes, Steelers – We’ll go with Holmes, the defending Super Bowl MVP, in this category, but it’s a close decision over DeSean Jackson of the Eagles. Both are significant starters for their teams and emerging stars in the league. Other notable 10: Jabar Gaffney, Broncos

11 – Larry Fitzgerald, Cardinals – Fitzgerald is one of the very best receivers in the league, and so he gets the nod as the premier wideout wearing No. 11. He became a superstar in last year’s playoffs, doing what he had done in relative obscurity earlier in his career in Arizona. Fitzgerald is the real deal. Other notable 11s: Mike Sims-Walker, Jaguars; Mohammed Massaquoi, Browns; Roy Williams, Cowboys; Laveranues Coles, Bengals; Julian Edelman, Patriots; Legedu Naanee, Chargers; Roscoe Parrish, Bills; Stefan Logan, Steelers

12 – Marques Colston, Saints – Colston is the premier receiver on the league’s most potent offense, and now that he’s healthy he’s showing incredible skills for his size. That gives him the nod over Steve Smith of the Giants as the best No. 12 wideout in the league. Both Colston and Smith may have to move over for Minnesota rookie Percy Harvin at some point in the future. Other notable 12s: Michael Jenkins, Falcons; Justin Gage, Titans; Darrius Heyward-Bey, Raiders; Quan Cosby, Bengals

13 – Johnny Knox, Bears – Knox is the only notable receiver wearing No. 13 this year. The rookie out of Abilene Christian has had a nice freshman season in the NFL with three receiving TDs and a return for a score. Maybe he’ll make 13 a trendier, if not luckier, number for wideouts.

14 – Brandon Stokley, Broncos – Like 13, 14 isn’t a popular number for receivers. Stokley, who had good seasons with the Colts and the most memorable touchdown of the season off a tip in the opener against the Bengals, is the best of the bunch over St. Louis prospect Keenan Burton. Other notable 14: Eric Weems, Falcons

15 – Brandon Marshall, Broncos – Marshall’s numbers aren’t quite as good this season as fellow 15 Steve Breaston of Arizona, but Marshall is the more dynamic and more important player than Arizona’s talented third receiver. Marshall has the talent to be one of the league’s top-5 overall receivers. Other notable 15s: Kelley Washington, Ravens; Chris Henry, Bengals; Davone Bess, Dolphins; Michael Crabtree, 49ers; Courtney Roby, Saints

16 – Josh Cribbs, Browns – Lance Moore of the Saints is the only notable pure wide receiver wearing No. 16 right now, but Cribbs, Cleveland’s do-everything guy, plays enough receiver and has a receiver number, so he counts here. Cribbs catches the ball, returns kicks, and plays under center in the wildcat. He may be the league’s best return man, and he’s growing as an offensive force. Moore had a strong season as New Orleans’ slot receiver last year, but injuries have hampered his production this year. Other notable 16: Danny Amendola, Rams

17 – Braylon Edwards, Jets – Edwards had fallen out of favor in Cleveland last year and this season, and his numbers reflected that diminished importance, but he’s now in New York and gaining steam. So we’ll list him as the top 17 over rookies Mike Wallace of Pittsburgh and Austin Collie of Indianapolis. Other notable 17s: Donnie Avery, Rams; Robert Meachem, Saints

18 – Sidney Rice, Vikings – Rice is emerging as the Vikings’ most reliable receiver, and he has become one of Brett Favre’s favorite targets. His good size and exceptional ball skills and leaping ability are finally starting to shine through now that he’s in his third season. He beats a crop of rookies to earn the honor as the best receiver wearing 18. Other notable 18s: Kenny Britt, Titans; Jeremy Maclin, Eagles; Louis Murphy, Raiders; Sammie Stroughter, Buccaneers

19 – Miles Austin, Cowboys – Austin has come out of nowhere over the past three games to establish himself as an explosive threat and the Cowboys’ best receiver. Even with the return heroics of Miami’s Ted Ginn Jr. and Denver’s Eddie Royal this year, Austin is the best 19. Other notable 19: Devery Henderson, Saints

23 – Devin Hester, Bears – Because Hester came into the NFL as a defensive back, he’s been allowed to keep his old DB number of 23 even though he’s now a wide receiver. The fact that he’s Chicago’s No. 1 outside target makes this a legitimate listing for a bit of a funky number for a receiver.

80 – Andre Johnson, Texans – If you made me pick one receiver as the best in the league, this is the guy. He has freakish size, incredible speed, and great production throughout his career. The only pockmark on his resume is the fact that he’s been dinged up from time to time. So he gets an easy decision here over Donald Driver of Green Bay as the best receiver wearing 80. Other notable 80s: Earl Bennett, Bears; Malcom Floyd, Chargers; Bryant Johnson, Lions; Bobby Wade, Chiefs; Marty Booker, Falcons; Mike Thomas, Jaguars

81 – Randy Moss, Patriots – Moss is already an all-time great, and he’s still performing at a premium level for the Pats. This is an easy call, even though  current great Anquan Boldin of Arizona, past greats Torry Holt of the Jaguars and Terrell Owens of the Bills, and future great Calvin Johnson of Detroit also wear 81. This number has great depth of talent. Other notable 81: Nate Burleson, Seahawks

82 – Dwayne Bowe, Chiefs – As deep as 81 is in talent, 82 is thin. We’ll give the nod to Bowe over the Giants’ Mario Manningham because Bowe has had more good seasons, even though Manningham has been more impactful this year. Other notable 82s: Antwaan Randle El, Redskins; Brian Hartline, Dolphins

83 – Wes Welker, Patriots – Welker, who piles up gobs of catches as the jitterbug/security blanket of the Patriots offense, narrowly gets this nod over Vincent Jackson of San Diego, who has joined the list of the league’s 10 best receivers. Lee Evans of Buffalo doesn’t have equivalent numbers because his quarterbacks have stunk for years, but he’s no slouch either. Other notable 83s: Kevin Walter, Texans; Deion Branch, Seahawks; Sinorice Moss, Giants

84 – Roddy White, Falcons – White has emerged as one of the top receivers in the league over the past three years, and he looks like he’ll team with Matt Ryan for a long time as Atlanta’s dynamic duo. We’ll take the ascending White over the descending T.J. Houshmandzadeh, who has had a great career in Cincinnati but is starting to show signs of slippage in his first season in Seattle. Other notable 84s: Patrick Crayton, Cowboys; Josh Morgan, 49ers; Bobby Engram, Chiefs; Javon Walker, Raiders

85 – Chad Ochocinco, Bengals – We have to give this jersey-number to Ochocinco, since he changed his name to be his jersey number in Spanish (kind of). But Ochocinco deserves it given the renaissance year he is having with the Bengals. Derrick Mason of the Ravens contended for the honor based on his long career, while Greg Jennings of the Packers could claim this honor in the future. Other notable 85s: Pierre Garcon, Colts; Jerheme Urban, Cardinals

86 – Hines Ward, Steelers – There aren’t a lot of great receivers wearing 86, but there is one – Ward. The former Super Bowl MVP isn’t just great at catching the ball; he’s a vicious blocker downfield as well. He’s a borderline Hall of Famer who is still building his resume. Other notable 86s: Dennis Northcutt, Lions; Brian Finneran, Falcons

87 – Reggie Wayne, Colts – Wayne has seamlessly taken over for Marvin Harrison as Peyton Manning’s premier target in Indy, and now Wayne is building his own case for the Hall of Fame. There aren’t five receivers in the league who are better or more explosive than Wayne. Other notable 87s: Bernard Berrian, Vikings; Andre Caldwell, Bengals; Muhsin Muhammad, Panthers; Mike Furrey, Browns; David Clowney, Jets; Jordy Nelson, Packers; Domenik Hixon, Giants

88 – Isaac Bruce, 49ers – Bruce is no longer the dynamic force he was for years in St. Louis, but he’s good enough to claim this number as his lifetime achievement award. Rookie Hakeem Nicks of the Giants is the only other significant 88 as a receiver, but he looks as though he will be a good one. Other notable 88: Chansi Stuckey, Browns

89 – Steve Smith, Panthers – Smith hasn’t had the season this year that he’s had in the past, and he’s even felt at times that he wasn’t an asset to his team, but those problems have more to do with the struggles of Carolina QB Jake Delhomme than with Smith’s own shortcomings. Smith is just 5-foot-9, but he’s lightning quick, built like a brick house, tough to bring down, and shockingly good on jump balls. He’s still an elite receiver. Other notable 89s: Santana Moss, Redskins; Jerricho Cotchery, Jets; Mark Clayton, Ravens; Antonio Bryant, Buccaneers; James Jones, Packers

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Ravens/Vikings thoughts

A few thoughts on the Week 6 game between the Baltimore Ravens and the Minnesota Vikings, both from an on-field perspective and a fantasy football perspective. The Vikings survived a last-second field goal attempt to win a 33-31 barnburner.

On-field perspective
*Vikings QB Brett Favre got off to a hot start, but after the first two drives he started to come back to earth. Favre still throws hard, but his receivers helped him out with some nice catches of balls that were a tad off target. He wasn’t always 100 percent sharp, but he was plenty good enough for the Vikings to win. If Favre continues to play like this, the Vikings are going to be tough to beat, because the rest of their team is stout.
*One thing helping Favre is his underrated group of receivers. Sidney Rice is emerging as a dependable threat, and Bernard Berrian and Percy Harvin both bringspeed and surprising toughness. And TE Visanthe Shiancoe is a terrific middle of the field target. Minnesota’s receiving corps doesn’t get a lot of props, but it’s better than you think.
*Meanwhile, Ravens QB Joe Flacco lacks that kind of threats. The fact that RB Ray Rice was the team’s leading receiver entering the game says it all. Derrick Mason is generally dependable, although he offers few breakaway opportunities. The rest of the receiving group is pedestrian. That’s going to hold the Ravens back in games like this one when they’re trying to play from behind.
*While the Ravens showed vulnerability on defense, I liked the offense’s persistence throughout the game. Even though they were down early, they fought back and made a game of it. That heart makes the Ravens dangerous despite their shortcomings.
*Rice is a emerging young player, but Flacco needs to fight his propensity to check down to him is a little too much of a security blanket right now. Rice had six first-half catches, including a line-of-scrimmage check-down on the final offensive snap of the half on a play that Flacco should have thrown into the end zone on. That’s the kind of thing Flacco will learn to do as he becomes more secure in what he can and can’t do. I’m all for using Rice as a weapon, as on his long fourth-quarter catch and run, but the Ravens can’t rely on him to move the offense as a check-down option.
*The Ravens’ defense gets a lot of pub, but it showed some softeness in the secondary, especially early. The best defensive player I saw was Terrell Suggs, who is a great pass rusher but a good player all over the field. He’s as complete a player as a 3-4 outside linebacker can be.
* The Vikings’ defensive line is stout. Jared Allen gets all the attention, but Kevin Williams blows stuff up inside on a regular basis, and Ray Edwards and Pat Williams are assets as well. That’s as good a group of four as there is in the league. Allen made some plays against Ravens rookie OLT Michael Oher, although Oher wasn’t completely embarrassed the way Green Bay’s Daryn Colledge was against Allen.
*You have to wonder, after Steven Hauschka missed a 44-yard field goal that would have won the game, if the Ravens wish they had given stalwart kicker Matt Stover (now with the Colts) another year. That miss was a killer.

Fantasy Football perspective
*Adrian Peterson is really, really good. ‘Nuff said. Even against a good defense, you see his talent pop off the screen, and he unquestionably is a No. 1 fantasy back.
*Sidney Rice is going to emerge as the Vikings’ No. 1 receiver by the end of the season. He’s the guy Favre seems to look to most often, and his size allows him to sit down in zones, while he has excellent hands. Rice may never be a 12-TD receiver, but he can develop into an 80-catch guy, and he can break a big play from time to time, as he showed twice in the second half. Rice should be at least a No. 3 fantasy receiver in larger leagues over the rest of the season.
*Bernard Berrian, meanwhile, has a relatively minor role in the offense, especially given his contract. He did catch a first-quarter touchdown, but he was wide open on that play, which definitely helped. He’s more of a No. 4 fantasy wideout. But his big-play ability, which he showed by drawing a long pass-interference penalty in the fourth quarter, is still an asset to the Vikings and gives him fantasy value as a fill-in.
*Percy Harvin, meanwhile, is faster and tougher than you would think. He’s still learning to be a receiver, but he has a surprising amount of polish for a rookie. He’s a borderline No. 3 fantasy receiver right now who will be much better next year.
*Visanthe Shiancoe is a top-10 fantasy tight end. His seven-TD season in ’08 looked like a fluke, given his past performance, but he’s following up on it in 2009. He caught his fourth and fifth TDs of the year and had several other nice grabs. He’s a big, rangy target who should be a good receiver – it just took him a while to develop. But now, he’s should be an every-week starter at tight end.
*Willis McGahee is probably the biggest fantasy anomaly of the season thus far. He has seven TDs but his role in the offense doesn’t support that kind of production. So don’t fall victim to his numbers and consider McGahee anything more than a No. 3 fantasy back. Meanwhile, Ray Rice is getting the lion’s share of the carries and he’s developing into a huge threat. This was a breakout fantasy game for Rice, who had two rushing touchdowns and 194 total yards from scrimmage. All of us now need to recognize that Rice is an every-week fantasy starter no matter who the Ravens are playing.
*Derrick Mason is the only Ravens’ wideout you want on a fantasy team. Mark Clayton and Kelley Washington don’t get enough looks, even though Clayton did have a touchdown catch in the fourth quarter, and TE Todd Heap had to stay in and block often enough that it will hamper his fantasy value. With OT Jared Gaither hurt, that trend for Heap could continue.
*While Joe Flacco doesn’t have one great target, he moves the ball around enough that he can still be hugely productive. His 385-yard, two-touchdown performance is the kind of thing he has done all season. He’s now a top-12 fantasy quarterback. Likewise, Favre is a top-12 fantasy quarterback. He had 278 yards and three TD passes in this game.

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Fantasy Football Applaud or a Fraud – Week 3

Each week, we dive into the stat sheets to see which weekly performers fantasy owners should applaud and which fantasy owners should write off as frauds. We’ve also included some key injury replacements in this post. You can read past applaud or a fraud analyses in the category listing. And if we’re changing a past recommendation, we’ll include it here as well. On we go…

Quarterbacks

Derek Anderson, Browns – You might have seen that Anderson replaced Brady Quinn via coach’s decision against the Ravens. We want to make sure you also see Anderson’s numbers – 92 yards passing, no touchdowns, three interceptions. At this point, keep each and every Brown as far away from your lineup as you can. Verdict: A fraud

Kyle Boller, Rams – I’ve always had a soft spot for Boller, who seemed to play well every time I saw him in a Ravens uniform. He stepped in for an injured Marc Bulger vs. the Packers and threw for 164 yards and two touchdowns, which aren’t bad numbers. It’s hard to picture a scenario in which Boller is worth starting in your fantasy league, but if Bulger’s shoulder injury is significant, Boller might merit backup-QB consideration in larger leagues (12 teams minimum). Otherwise, just ignore this new starter. Verdict: A fraud

Jason Campbell, Redskins – Campbell had a prototypical garbage-time line against the Lions, throwing for 340 yards and two touchdowns in a failed effort to bring the Redskins back against the Lions. It would be foolish to buy these numbers as something Campbell can do regularly, and that makes this an easy call. Verdict: A fraud

Chad Henne, Dolphins – Henne took over when Chad Pennington had to leave the game with an injury to his throwing shoulder. Now Pennington is out for the year, and that means that Henne isn’t a terrible backup option. He completed 10-of-19 passes for 92 yards with one pick and one sack. Henne won’t put up Kevin Kolb-ish fill-in numbers, but he’s a safe bet to throw for 175 yards or more, probably with a touchdown. So Henne is one of the better options among the fill-in quarterbacks. This is very mild applause, but still… Verdict: Applaud

Josh Johnson, Buccaneers – Johnson took over for Byron Leftwich during the Bucs’ abysmal offensive performance vs. the Giants, and Monday he was named the starter going forward. While Johnson isn’t as slow moving or throwing the ball as Leftwich is, he’s not a long-term answer because first-rounder Josh Freeman is lurking. So note this change – especially if you bought Leftwich’s OK fantasy numbers in blowouts the first two weeks of the season. Then walk away quietly. Verdict: A fraud

Seneca Wallace, Seahawks – Matt Hasselbeck tried to play against the Bears this week, but in the end he couldn’t go with a broken rib. So Seneca Wallace took his place and threw for 261 yards and a touchdown. Wallace started eight games last year and threw for 11 TDs and 1,500 yards, so he can be productive. If he plays next week against the Colts – which is not a sure thing, given how close Hasselbeck was to playing Sunday – Wallace has fantasy value, if for no other reason than the fact that the Seahawks will likely find themselves behind on the scoreboard. Verdict: Applaud

Running backs

Ahmad Bradshaw, Giants – Bradshaw, the Giants’ change-of-pace to bruiser Brandon Jacobs, had a big game against the Buccaneers with 104 yards on 14 carries. We’ll use his century mark to remind you that Bradshaw is a flex option in most yardage leagues most weeks, unless the Giants are playing a big-time defense. He’s a nice guy to have as an option. Verdict: Applaud

Glen Coffee, 49ers – Coffee, a rookie out of Alabama, really hasn’t gotten untracked yet this season, and he averaged less than 3 yards per carry in his 54-yard day taking over for Frank Gore against the Vikings. But with Gore likely to miss two games or more, Coffee is a legitimate starting running back who’s worth a pickup in your league and maybe even a start against the Rams next week depending on your other options. In fact, both his Week 4 matchup against the Rams and his Week 5 game against the Falcons are favorable. Grab Coffee if he’s available, and don’t rule him out of your lineup without some consideration this week. Verdict: Applaud

Jerome Harrison, Browns – With Jamal Lewis inactive, the Browns turned to Harrison instead of rookie James Davis to carry the load. Harrison did post 52 yards, but it took him 16 carries to do so. Our suggestion that you avoid any and all Browns definitely applies here. Verdict: A fraud

Julius Jones, Seahawks – Jones is one of the most overlooked starting running backs in the league, but he has been productive thus far this season. He had 98 rushing yards plus a 39-yard receiving TD this week against Chicago, which makes him worthy of starting in most fantasy leagues. He’s still more of a flex option than a top-2 running back for most teams, but he’s an OK fantasy option. Don’t overlook him completely. Verdict: Applaud

John Kuhn, Packers – A West Coast offense fullback is always a threat to vulture a touchdown away, and Kuhn did it twice this week against St. Louis. (If you had Kuhn and St. Louis’ Daniel Fells as the two-TD producers in that game, you are much better at fantasy football than I am.) Kuhn actually scored five TDs last year, and he will likely approach that number this year. But if he doesn’t score a TD, he has no fantasy value, so we can’t recommend him as a fantasy option, despite his nose for the end zone. Verdict: A fraud

LeSean McCoy, Eagles – The rookie from Pittsburgh got a clear shot at starting for Philly this week with Brian Westbrook inactive, and McCoy responded with 84 yards and a touchdown. When Westbrook is inactive, McCoy is a starting option in all fantasy leagues. But if Westbrook does what he’s done in the past and plays most weeks despite being listed as questionable, McCoy will be a more difficult guy to turn to. Still, McCoy is a necessary insurance policy for Westbrook owners, and he has some fantasy value on his own given Westbrook’s tendency to get dinged. Verdict: Applaud

Wide receivers

Bryant Johnson, Lions – Johnson is kind of a boom or bust player so far this year. He had four catches in the opener, none in Week 2, and then four catches for 73 yards and a score against the Redskins this week. Johnson is a good but not great receiver who has never had fewer than 39 catches in a season over his seven-year career, so we can expect him to put up some numbers. But with the mass of receivers the Lions have to support Calvin Johnson, Bryant will have to beat out Dennis Northcutt to be the No. 2 target. In the end, we expect that mantle to be passed back and forth, which will make it hard to start Bryant Johnson on any particular week. This is a close call, but there are better bench guys for your team. Verdict: A fraud

Pierre Garcon, Colts – Garcon, more than rookie Austin Collie, has stepped up and produced with Anthony Gonzalez injured. He has scored two weeks in a row now, and this week he was a consistent offensive threat with three catches for 64 yards. While Gonzalez is out – which is for several more weeks – Garcon is definitely ownable and even startable if you’re in a bye week pinch. Verdict: Applaud

Santana Moss, Redskins – After two disappointing games to start the season, Moss broke out with a huge game (10 catches for 178 yards and a score) against the Lions. But this production was due to the Redskins’ attempt at a late-game rally. Moss is ownable in most leagues and is a top-35 receiver, but it’s going to be hard to start him most weeks unless you’re missing other options due to bye weeks or injuries. Verdict: A fraud

Greg Lewis, Vikings – You’ll see Lewis all over the TV this week after his game-winning catch against the Vikings. But don’t get carried away and claim him. That 32-yard touchdown was Lewis’ only TD of the game, and he was only in the game because (according to Peter King) Percy Harvin had run seven straight go patterns and needed a breather. Harvin, Sidney Rice, and Bernard Berrian are still above Lewis on the Vikings’ receiver depth chart. Great catch, but Lewis has no fantasy value right now. Verdict: A fraud

Mike Wallace, Steelers – There isn’t a rookie receiver who’s having a better year than Wallace, a third-round pick who has emerged ahead of Limas Sweed as Pittsburgh’s No. 3 receiver. Wallace had a big game against the Bengals with seven catches for 102 yards, and he seems to be stepping into the role Nate Washington had with the team last year. Washington averaged 34 catches for 535 yards and four TDs the past three years with Pittsburgh, and those are reasonable targets for Wallace this year. That makes Wallace a top-50 fantasy receiver who’s worth having on your bench, especially as bye weeks force you to look deeper for roster help. Verdict: Applaud

Kevin Walter, Texans – Walter missed the first two games of the season with a hamstring injury, which may have causd some owners to forget about him or even to waive him. But in his first game back, Walter reminded everyone of his important role in a potent Texans’ offense with seven catches for 96 yards and a touchdown. He’s a starting-caliber receiver in all fantasy leagues now that he’s back on the field. Verdict: Applaud

Kelley Washington, Ravens – Washington, who showed some potential as a receiver with the Bengals five years ago, had become a special-teams specialist in recent years, but he’s getting the chance to catch the ball with Baltimore this year and making the most of it. He has at least three catches for at least 43 yards in each game this season, including a five-catch, 66-yard performance this week against Cleveland. He also has one touchdown. As Joe Flacco grows as a passer, he’s going to need to find depth at wide receiver, and Washington is providing it. Washington is still way under the radar, but he’s worth a pickup in deep leagues (12 teams or more) and worth watching in other leagues right now. Verdict: Applaud

Tight ends

Vernon Davis, 49ers – Davis, who was once a top-10 pick in the NFL draft, finally seems to be getting it under new 49ers head coach Mike Singletary. He also has a good connection with QB Shaun Hill. The results Sunday were a huge game – seven catches for 96 yards with two TDs. This might be the year that Davis finally emerges as a big-time receiving threat at tight end. At the least, he’s a top-12 fantasy tight end going forward. If he’s on the waiver wire in your league, he shouldn’t be after this week. Grab him as a bye-week fill-in or even as a starter if your TE option isn’t great. Verdict: Applaud

Daniel Fells, Rams – Honesty time: I had never heard of Fells before his name popped up in the box score this week. Turns out, he’s an H-back who has been in the league for three years and has 10 career catches. Both of his TDs this week against Green Bay came on the same play call, and you have to believe that won’t happen again. Good for Fells for scoring twice, but it ain’t gonna happen again. Verdict: A fraud

Kickers

Olindo Mare, Seahawks – We don’t normally list kickers here, but we wanted to note that Mare missed 43- and 34-yard tries against the Bears this week and was called out publicly by coach Jim Mora. It would not be a shock if Mare were cut this week and replaced by Brandon Coutu, who has been with Seattle the last two preseasons, or another free agent. Verdict: A fraud

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Free-agency review – post-draft through May

The free agent moves should start slowing down at this point, but there are still enough of them that it’s worth comparing them. This relativity comparison includes moves starting after draft day all the way through the the month of May. If you want to see previous comparisons, check out this post and move back from there.

10 – Seahawks (keep LB Leroy Hill; add CB Ken Lucas, FB Justin Griffith and LS Bryan Pittman) – Hill was Seattle’s franchise player, but the team pulled the tag off of him after drafting Aaron Curry. But the team still wanted to keep Hill, and so they ended up hammering out a long-term deal with him. Instead of a one-year, $8 million deal, Hill gets a six-year pact worth up to $38 million with $15.5 million guaranteed. He’s a solid player who will team with Curry and Lofa Tatupu to give Seattle a terrific (if expensive) linebacker trio. Lucas was a Seahawk for six years before moving to Carolina for big free-agent dollars. He’s a big physical corner who doesn’t have great speed but doesn’t need it for his style of play. It wasn’t that long ago that Lucas was a top-5 corner in the league. In fact, the Seahawks never were able to replace Lucas’ physicality after he left following the ’04 season. He probably shouldn’t be a No. 1 corner anymore, but he’s still a solid No. 2. Griffith is the prototypical fullback for a West Coast offense. Pittman had spent five-plus years as the Texans’ long snapper before being sidelined in the StarCaps case last year. He is a professional long snapper who fills a spot that’s been a void in Seattle the last couple of years.

10 (con’t) – Dolphins (add DE Jason Taylor) – Taylor and the Dolphins had an acrimonious divorce last offseason, as Taylor went Dancing with the Stars while new team grand poobah Bill Parcells laid down the law. The Fins dealt Taylor to Washington, but knee and calf injuries limited Taylor’s effectiveness. He played in 13 games, but managed just 3.5 sacks. After the season, Taylor decided he would rather spend the offseason at home in Florida than in the ‘Skins training program, so he asked for his release (and gave up $8 million in the process). Now, he lands back with Miami on a one-year, $1.1 million deal. Taylor had a great career in Miami (117 sacks in 11 years), and he really wants to be a Dolphin again. The team hopes that he can go opposite of Joey Porter to accelerate the team’s pass rush. Motivation shouldn’t be a question for Taylor, who seems excited to be back. And in a limited role, he should still be a quality contributor. All in all, it’s a good investment for the Dolphins, who get a pass rusher and a fan favorite for a budget-conscious price. In the end, the Dolphins got a second-rounder from Washington but only lost Taylor’s services for a year.

9 – Bengals (add S Roy Williams) – Williams had some good seasons as an in-the-box safety in Dallas, even reaching Pro Bowl level. But over recent years, his performance has plummeted as his coverage inadequacies have been exposed. That, plus a hefty price tag, led the Cowboys to cut the cord. Now he heads to Cincinnati, where he’s reunited with ex-Cowboys defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer. Zimmer knows what Williams does well and what he can’t do, which gives the Bengals a little better than average chance to use Williams well. Plus, his veteran leadership could help a team that’s slowly building a new defensive nucleus around LBs Keith Rivers and Rey Maualuga. On a short-term, incentive-laden deal, it’s easy to see why Cincinnati would take this shot.

9 (con’t) – 49ers (add CB Dre Bly) – The 49ers replaced Walt Harris, who blew out his ACL in minicamp, with Bly, a fellow veteran who has been a long-term starter in Denver, Detroit, and St. Louis and has 40 career interceptions and Pro Bowl nods in ’03 and ’04.. Bly isn’t as big as Harris, and he’s more of a gambler, but he will provide the expertise and veteran play that San Fran needs across from Nate Clements. Bly is also three years younger, and so while he’s not in his prime anymore, he’s not that far past it. It will be interesting to see if Bly’s ball-hawking style fits Mike Singletary’s approach as well as Harris’ more physical play did. But given how late in free agency Harris’ injury happened, Bly is about the best option the 49ers could have come up with. They needed corner help badly, and they got it in this veteran.

8 – Lions (add LB Larry Foote, OTs Jon Jansen and Ephriam Salaam, OG Toniu Fonoti, and DEs Eric Hicks and Jason Hunter) – Foote had been cut in Pittsburgh for salary-cap reasons. Not only is Foote a Michigan native and alum, he’s an extremely solid inside ‘backer on running downs. He has limitations and probably shouldn’t be trying to drop into coverage, but he is a quality NFL starter who definitely upgrades Detroit’s lion-up. (Sorry.) It’s only a one-year deal, but if Foote provides leadership that term could be extended. Regardless, the Lions’ defense is better today because Foote is there. Jansen quickly latched on with the Lions on a one-year, minimum-salary deal. Like ILB Larry Foote, he’s a Michigan alum who comes home to try to help the first steps of Detroit’s rebuilding process. He might not start, but he provides depth at a trouble spot and should help to mentor ‘08 first-rounder Gosder Cherilus. That’s a good deal for the Lions at the vet minimum. Salaam has started 129 games in his 11 NFL seasons, but he became a backup in Houston last year. Still, given the fact that Detroit didn’t draft a tackle this year, Salaam could find a role for a single season, even with Jansen now around. Hicks and Fonoti are veterans who may not have much left but who are worth a look for a team as talent-depleted as Detroit. Hunter lost his spot in Green Bay when the Packers moved to a 3-4 defense, but he can contribute as a 4-3 end in Detroit.

7 – Browns (add CB Rod Hood and WR Mike Furrey) – Hood, who had started the last two years for the Cardinals, was shoved aside after Arizona added Bryant McFadden. Hood is a big, physical corner who is apt to give up the big play but is an asset against the run and is good enough to start. He steps into a weak spot on the depth chart in Cleveland, and he should surpass Corey Ivy, Eric Wright, or Brandon McDonald to continue as a starter there. As long as the Browns don’t count on him for much man coverage, Hood will help. Meanwhile, the Browns are in serious upheaval at wide receiver. They’ve cut the cord on Joe Jurevicius, and we now must expect Donte Stallworth to miss some time with legal matters related to a deadly car accident he was involved in last year. And that doesn’t even address the persistent Braylon Edwards trade rumors. So Cleveland has tried to reload at receiver, by signing David Patten and drafting Brian Robiskie and Mohammed Massaquoi in the second round. Now they add Mike Furrey, who bounced through the XFL and the Arena League before establishing himself as a legit NFL receiver. Furrey’s best success has come in Mike Martz systems in St. Louis and Detroit, and he doesn’t have great size, but it’s still easy to see him as an effective inside receiver. If nothing else, he’ll try hard and give some level of certainty at a very uncertain position for Cleveland.

6 – Colts (kept LB Freddie Keiaho and DT Ed Johnson) – The Colts didn’t tender Keiaho a contract as a restricted free agent even though he was a starter last season. But they’re bringing him back on a one-year deal to help in a problem area. Keiaho’s small, but he makes enough plays to warrant some snaps. Johnson is a talented defensive tackle who the Colts let go last year after a drug-possession arrest. He fits a need, and the Colts are making it clear that Johnson has a supershort leash. But if he takes advantage of another chance, he’ll help.

6 (con’t) – Saints (add DE Anthony Hargrove) – Hargrove sat out the entire ’08 season after his third violation of the league’s substance abuse policy. He has been reinstated, which makes him valuable to the Saints, who need DE depth for the first four games of the season pending the disputed suspensions of DEs Will Smith and Charles Grant. Both of those starters face four-game bans for using performance-enhancing substances, but they are appealing in court, and no final decision has come down. So Hargrove ends up being a talented insurance policy if he can stay clean.

5 – Patriots (add LB Paris Lenon S Brandon McGowan) – Lenon led the Lions in tackles last year with 121, but he figures in more as a backup in New England. He adds depth and probably fills the roster spot that injured third-round pick Tyrone McKenzie would have occupied. McGowan missed all of last season with an injury, but the former Bear is a physical safety who can step in if rookie Patrick Chung isn’t ready to go for the Pats. With Rodney Harrison likely done, the Pats are wise to add some depth at safety.

5 (con’t) – Raiders (add FB Lorenzo Neal, RB Gary Russell, TE J.P. Foschi and S Keith Davis) – Neal has long been the best blocking fullback in the league. He’s still a hammer who can help open holes for Oakland’s talented running backs. Russell is a backup type who had a short-yardage role in Pittsburgh last year. But he’s unlikely to get many carries or even make the opening-game roster with Darren McFadden, Justin Fargas, and Michael Bush ahead of him on the depth chart. Davis played seven years in Dallas and established himself as a special-teams ace, and last year he started half the year at safety. The Raiders probably need someone better to start, but Davis can be a good backup and a very good contributor on specialty units.

4 – Broncos (add LB Nick Griesen and RB Darius Walker) – Griesen was a backup in Baltimore, and so he knows the 3-4 defense and could fit in for Denver, which is implementing the defense but is still looking for players to start, much less fill roles. Walker showed some promise during his two years in Houston, but he’s not of the caliber of Denver’s top running backs Knowshon Moreno, Correll Buckhalter, or even holdover Peyton Hillis.

4 (con’t) – Bears (add LB Pisa Tinoisamoa and TE Michael Gaines) – Tinoisamoa has limitations, but he fits in as a two-down linebacker alongside Brian Urlacher and Lance Briggs in Chicago. The Tower (of Pisa) knows Bears coach Lovie Smith from the St. Louis days, so the defense will be familiar. Tinoisamoa is a clean-up tackler who doesn’t make a ton of big plays, but he won’t need to with superstars Briggs and Urlacher there. He should help to stabilize the defense and allow Briggs and Urlacher a bit more freedom to attack, both of which are advantages for the Bears. This seems to be a good fit for the Tower. Gaines is a bulky blocking tight end who doesn’t figure as a receiving threat behind Greg Olsen and Desmond Clark but could be useful as a jumbo-package role player. It’s a shame the Bears have three legit tight ends but such a paucity of wideouts.

3 – Chiefs (add C Eric Ghiacius) – Ghiacius started all 16 games at center for the Bengals last year, and he’ll compete with Rudy Niswanger for a starting job in K.C. Ghiacius is a marginal NFL starter, but it will help the Chiefs to have another veteran around for the sake of depth and competition.

3 (con’t) – Steelers (add WR Shaun McDonald, P Dirk Johnson and RB Verron Haynes) – McDonald had a big year in ’07 with Detroit, but when Mike Martz left his role in the offense diminished. McDonald is small but quick. He fits in as a third or fourth receiver in Pittsburgh, but having a veteran like him around is smart because the Steelers still don’t know how second-year WR Limas Sweed will develop. Johnson, who punted in 13 games for the Cardinals last season, is a marginal NFL punter, but he will at least provide some competition at a spot that was a problem for Pittsburgh last year. Haynes was a long-time Steeler who didn’t play last year. He could end up as a backup running back in a bit role.

2 – Ravens (add QB John Beck and WR Kelley Washington) – After the emergence of Joe Flacco last year, the Ravens don’t really have a quarterback need. They have a young starter and a young promising backup in Troy Smith. But Ravens offensive coordinator Cam Cameron drafted Beck in the second round when he was the head coach in Miami, and so he obviously sees potential in him. So the Ravens gave Beck a one-year contract that could last longer because Beck, with just two years of service time, will be controlled by the Ravens for at least one additional season. This is a low-risk move that could pay off in terms of a future trade if Cameron can restore the luster Beck once had as a prospect. Washington is a big, rangy receiver who had some success as a receiver in Cincinnati but never lived up to his potential. Then he went to New England and became a standout special-teamer, which speaks well of his character as a teammate. He’ll find a special-teams role in Baltimore and provide needed depth at receiver, but it’s unlikely that he’ll move too far up the depth chart.

2 (con’t) – Redskins (add WR Roydell Williams and OT Jeremy Bridges) – The Redskins won’t have WR depth until second-year players Devin Thomas and Malcolm Kelly develop, so they take a flier on Williams, a former Titan who didn’t play last season. If he provides competition for Thomas and Kelly, he will have done his job. Bridges started 28 games at guard and tackle in Carolina over the past three seasons, but repeated legal troubles led the Panthers to cut the cord. He needs to be on a short leash, but he is good enough to at least provide quality depth.

1 – Jaguars (add QB Todd Bouman) – Bouman, a third-stringer who was let go in Baltimore after the Ravens acquired John Beck, could move up a spot to No. 2 in Jacksonville if he can beat out Cleo Lemon. You don’t want Bouman to start, but he’s a pro who knows the offense and won’t kill you as a short-term fill-in.

1 (con’t) – Cardinals (add OT Oliver Ross and TE Dominique Byrd) – Ross is a 10-year vet who spent the last two seasons on injured reserve after a decent career in Dallas and Arizona. At this point, he’s probably a long shot to contribute, but why not take a shot if you’re the Cardinals? Byrd is a former Rams prospect who didn’t play last year but could figure into a muddle tight-end situation for the Cards.

1 (con’t) – Giants (add G Tutan Reyes and TE George Wrighster) – Reyes is a huge guard who has been around since 2000. He started three games in Jacksonville last year, but he’s probably better off as a backup who provides veteran wile and can fill in in a pinch. Wrighster is another former Jaguar who has 94 career catches but is more of a backup who will fall in line behind Kevin Boss in New York.

1 (con’t) – Jets (keep TE Bubba Franks) – Franks, a former first-round pick, was an adequate blocker with the Jets last year. He should be a solid complement to receiving threat Dustin Keller once again.

1 (con’t) – Panthers (add OG Justin Geisinger) – Geisinger was a reserve for the Redskins last year, but he could find a roster spot in Carolina. The Panthers have lost their top three OL backups this offseason, and they showed last offseason a strategy bring in low-cost vets and let them compete for jobs. Geisinger at least provides such competition. He’s also the first free-agent addition of the offseason for the cap-strapped Panthers.

1 (con’t) – Rams (add WR Tim Carter) – Carter once showed potential with the Giants, but injuries kept him from making an impact. New Rams coach Steve Spagnuolo must have seen enough to remember Carter and give him another shot. Unfortunately for Carter, it’s a long shot.

1 (con’t) – Texans (add LB Boomer Grigsby) – Grigsby is an undersized ‘backer who can play inside and on special teams.

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