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Week 4 Transactions

Denver Broncos receiver Brandon Stokley, 14, g...

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Each week we share insights, analysis, and opinions of the week’s transactions. To see previous posts, click here and start working back. 

Jets (signed DT Trevor Pryce, cut DT Howard Green) – We discussed the Pryce move in this post. To make room for him, the Jets cut Green, whom they signed after Kris Jenkins’ injury.

Ravens (cut Pryce, re-sign S Ken Hamlin) – We discussed the price of Pryce (and Hamlin) in this post.

Jaguars (claimed QB Trent Edwards) – The Jaguars, who lost Luke McCown to injury earlier this year, claimed Edwards off waivers after Buffalo released him. Edwards immediately becomes the most solid backup option Jacksonville has, and if David Garrard continues to struggle, Edwards could get a few starts to see if he fits in Jax.

Bills (sign QB Levi Brown) – After cutting Edwards, the Bills brought back Brown, their seventh-round pick out of Troy this season. He’ll become the No. 3 quarterback behind Ryan Fitzpatrick and Brian Brohm.

Seahawks (add WR Brandon Stokley, cut RB Quinton Ganther and OG Chester Pitts) – Stokley (pictured), who played for the Broncos last year, can fill in as a slot-type receiver. The Seahawks are playing a bunch of wideouts now but haven’t developed consistently reliable options, so Stokely could help.

Patriots (add RB Thomas Clayton, cut OG Quinn Ojinnaka) – With Fred Taylor hurting, Kevin Faulk out for the year, and Laurence Maroney in Denver, the Pats added RB depth with Clayton. They cut Ojinnaka, whom they acquired in a training-camp trade with the Falcons.

Texans (add CB Karl Paymah) – Paymah, who has bounced around to Minnesota and Denver in recent years, is a speedy and kind of tall corner who isn’t great but is good enough to be a No. 4. He adds depth to one of Houston’s big problem areas.

Colts (add LB Tyjuan Hagler, cut TE Gijon Robinson) – Hagler returns to Indy to help fill in after injuries to Clint Session and Kavell Connor.

Saints (add PK John Carney) – With Garrett Hartley struggling in two of three games this year, the Saints brought back Carney, who is 46 but should be reliable from 40 yards and in. They kept Hartley, who still has a chance to develop as a top-flight NFL kicker, but it’s clear they don’t have confidence in him right now.

Lions (add CB Dante Wesley, cut S Randy Phillips) – Detroit brought back Wesley, a cornerback who’s a big asset on special teams.

Panthers (add C Chris Morris, cut DT Louis Leonard) – The Panthers cut Leonard, whom they traded for last year, in part because he had been passed by Nick Hayden and Derek Landri. His roster spot went to Morris, who adds depth to an offensive line that had little.

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FR: March signings

As we continue our coverage of free agency, we’ll compare signings from March using Football Relativity. This post includes signings beginning March 11; for signings from the first week of free agency, check out this elongated post.

10 – Jets (added RB LaDainian Tomlinson, S Brodney Pool, and LB Lance Laury; kept FB Tony Richardson) – Tomlinson had a great career in San Diego, but he showed serious signs of slowing down in recent years, with his yards-per-carry average dropping to 3.3 in ’09. So the Chargers eventually had little choice but to release him and move on. With the Jets, Tomlinson should know that he’s taking a subservient role to emerging youngster Shonn Greene, and with Leon Washington returning from an ACL injury, Tomlinson could find carries hard to come by. The positive of that is that Tomlinson will stay fresher, but he’ll have to show a little more patience than he did in San Diego. If Tomlinson knows what he’s signing up for and is willing to be a 10-touch-a-game back, he could help because he provides more contrast to Greene than the departed Thomas Jones would have given. If not, Tomlinson will fade away in a strange-looking uniform, and the two-year, $5.1 million deal the Jets gave him will be wasted. Unfortunately, our hunch points toward the latter scenario. Meanwhile, Pool is a promising player who wasn’t tendered as a restricted free agent in Cleveland. He’ll get $1.3 million in a one-year deal with the Jets, where he’ll have a chance to replace the traded Kerry Rhodes in the starting lineup. Richardson is a solid blocking fullback who knows his role and plays it well. Laury, who was not tendered by the Seahawks, is a backup linebacker and special-teams ace.

10 (con’t) – Cardinals (added OLB Joey Porter, QB Derek Anderson, UFA OG Rex Hadnot and UFA LB Paris Lenon; kept UFA OT Jeremy Bridges, UFA LB Monty Biesel, and C Ben Claxton) – Porter, who was released by the Dolphins, is still a quality pass rusher who can make an impact in a  3-4 defense. At age 33, Porter has a lot of miles on his tires, but with 26.5 sacks in the last two years he hasn’t shown signs of major slippage. He helps to replace Bertrand Berry, who said he is retiring, for an Arizona defense that needs playmakers badly after losing Karlos Dansby and Antrel Rolle in the offseason. Porter isn’t the athlete the departed are, but he can help. While $17.5 million over three years (with a potential $7 million more in incentives) seems rich for a 33-year-old, Arizona was in a spot where it needed a defensive jolt. Porter can still provide that. Anderson, who had one good year out of four in Cleveland, got a two-year, $7.25 million contract in Arizona to back up or even challenge Matt Leinart. Anderson is not consistent, but he has a strong arm, and he’s fearless enought to go for the big play. That has too often led to interceptions, but in the run-first, big-play offense Arizona is moving toward, he could actually be a fit. The fact that Arizona has such a talented corps of receivers makes Anderson a better chance. At the least, he’ll challenge Leinart and force the former first-rounder to step up in order to seize the starting job, and if Anderson does that he’ll be worth the freight the Cards are paying. Hadnot got a three-year, $9 million deal to move over from Cleveland. He’s a physical guard who can also play center and figures to become a starter for Arizona. Bridges, who started several games last year, is a talented tackle who has gotten into trouble off the field. Lenon started for the Rams last year and now moves over to provide a veteran to help fill the gaping hole left by Karlos Dansby. Biesel provides depth but will help more on special teams.

9 – none

8 – Bills (added UFA DE Dwan Edwards and ILB Andra Davis; kept UFA TE Joe Klopfenstein) – As they move to a 3-4 defense, the Bills brought in reinforcements. Davis had a pretty good year as an inside ‘backer for Denver last year and was a nice addition on a two-year deal. Edwards, who got a four-year, $18 million deal to move over from the Ravens, is a sturdy end who can shine in the 3-4. Both are quality additions for a team that desperately needs them.

7 – Browns (added UFA TE Benjamin Watson and QB Jake Delhomme; kept UFA OL Billy Yates) – Watson was an inconsistent talent in New England, but he had some production, and he’s a better tight end than what the Browns had. Tight end is a crucial receiver in the West Coast offense, which is what Cleveland is moving toward, and so making an addition at that position is sensible. Watson got a three-year deal worth $12 million with $6.35 million guaranteed. Delhomme got $7 million over two years while still getting $19 million guaranteed from the Panthers deal he was released from. Delhomme is a terrific locker-room leader, and he has shown a knack for performing well under pressure earlier in his career. But his interception and fumble problems have been stark since his meltdown in a playoff game against Arizona in the 2008 season, and at this point it’s hard to see him breaking that year-long trend soon. Still, Delhomme may be a better answer than Seneca Wallace, who doesn’t have the pedigree of performance Delhomme has over his career. The Browns are getting a little bit of a discount on Delhomme because of his sweetheart Carolina deal, and at those numbers he’s worth a shot. We just don’t expect that shot to come in. Yates is a backup lineman who helps add depth now that Rex Hadnot and Hank Fraley are gone.

6 – Redskins (added UFA RB Larry Johnson, UFA QB Rex Grossman, P Josh Bidwill, and CB Philip Buchanon) – Johnson was released in Kansas City midseason last year as his production waned and his complaints persisted.  Johnson landed in Cincinnati as a backup to Cedric Benson, and he looked a little better, averaging 4.4 yards per carry in Cincy versus 2.9 in K.C. Now Johnson moves to Washington, where he will either work with Clinton Portis or replace him, depending on what the ‘Skins decide to do with their incumbent veteran back. Since Portis’ contract is basically guaranteed, we figure he’ll be back. That’s just as well, because Johnson is no longer a starting-caliber NFL back. He’s better in the role he had in Cincinnati at the end of last year, and spot duty will allow him to keep the limited pop he has left in his legs. The three-year, $3.5 million deal Johnson got indicates that’s the role he’ll have – but the potential of making up to $12 million in incentives indicates that more malcontent behavior could be in the offing if Johnson doesn’t get the ball as much as he wants. Grossman, a former Bears starter, was solid as a Texans backup last year and now moves with ex-Houston offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan to Washington. Chances are that Grossman, who got a one-year deal, will back up Jason Campbell. Bidwill was released by the Buccaneers in a cost-saving move after missing the ’09 season, but if healthy he is solid. Incumbent Hunter the Punter Smith is a free-agent, so the Redskins need a fallback option. Buchanon got a one-year, $1.5 million deal to provide help at corner. Buchanon’s a marginal starter but he’s worth that price for depth purposes if nothing else.

5 – none

4 – Chiefs (added OG Ryan Lilja; kept C Casey Wiegmann) – Wiegmann made a Pro Bowl with the Chiefs two years ago and now returns after being cut earlier this offseason. His veteran wiles help a young offensive line. Lilja, who started for the Colts over the past few years before being released this offseason, got a three-year, $7.5 million deal to come to K.C. and help to stabilize the offensive line as well. He’s not an elite guard, but Lilja will be a big upgrade for a Chiefs team that needs solid starters up front.

3 – Packers (kept UFA OT Mark Tauscher, franchise NT Ryan Pickett, and RFA S Nick Collins; added P Chris Bryan) – The Packers rarely get too involved in the free-agent market, instead preferring to develop through the draft. So it’s no surprise that their big strategy has been to re-sign their players. Tauscher, who the Packers brought back at midseason last year to help a horrible offensive line, got a two-year deal to remain at right tackle. He’s a veteran who provides stability until T.J. Lang is ready to seize a starting job. Pickett, the Pack’s franchise player, went from a $7 million tender to a four-year, $28 million deal. He’s done a great job for the Pack after bombing as a first-rounder in St. Louis, and he became even more valuable when he moved to the nose when Green Bay implemented the 3-4 defense last year. Collins, who had been angling for a new contract for two years, got a four-year, $23.4 million deal. He’s a playmaking safety who really adds to the Packers’ defense. Bryan is an Australian Rules Football player whom the Pack hopes can become a solid NFL punter a la Sav Rocca, Mat McBriar, or Darren Bennett. That strategy has actually been pretty successful for NFL teams.

3 (con’t) – Rams (added C Hank Fraley, CB Kevin Dockery, and TE Darcy Johnson; kept LS Chris Massey) – Fraley, who was released by the Browns, isn’t physically gifted, but he’s a rugged center who can help an offensive line that really struggled last year. Dockery and Johnson are former Giants who know now-Rams head coach Steve Spagnuolo from days in the Meadowlands. Neither is more than a role player, but they could help a roster bereft of talent. Massey got a four-year deal for being a dependable long snapper.

3 (con’t) – Steelers (added UFA ILB Larry Foote; kept UFA QB Charlie Batch) – Foote was a long-time Steeler who was cut before last season and went to Detroit, where he played well. Now he returns to Pittsburgh on a decent deal that’s worth $3.9 million in year one and potentially worth $9.3 million over three years. He should return to the starting lineup for Pittsburgh. Batch provides stability at quarterback, which is vital given Ben Roethlisberger’s legal problems and Dennis Dixon’s inexperience.

2 – Titans (kept UFA CB Rod Hood; added UFA DE Jason Babin and CB Tye Hill) – Hood started for the Cardinals in the Super Bowl two years ago and then went on an odyssey through Cleveland and Chicago before he found a home in Tennessee at midseason. The Titans brought him back because he fit their defense and can provide depth at a position that has been troublesome for them. Babin was an unrestricted free agent who had given the Eagles right to match any contract offer he got, but Philly opted to let Babin leave on a one-year, $1 million deal. Babin has never realized his potential as a first-round pass-rusher, but Tennessee’s defensive line coach Jim Washburn is one of the best, which makes taking a shot on a talented player reasonable, especially at the price Tennessee is paying. Hill, a bust with the Rams, never found a role with the Falcons last year and was released. But he’s fast, and given the Titans’ struggles last year in the secondary he’s worth a shot to see if he can help.

2 (con’t) – Chargers (added CBs Donald Strickland and Nathan Vasher; kept UFA DT Ian Scott) – Scott did a solid job as a fill-in starter at nose tackle for the Chargers last year, and he fits in as at least a backup this season. Strickland, who was released by the Jets, now gets a chance to replace Antonio Cromartie, who was traded to the Jets. Strickland isn’t great, but he’s good enough to be a third corner on a good team or maybe even a starter, so he’s a nice addition for the Bolts. Vasher hasn’t played well in recent years, in large part because of injury, but he performed admirably for Bolts defensive coordinator Ron Rivera back in Chicago, and that led to this chance in San Diego. Vasher, a cover-two specialist, got a two-year, $4.5 million deal

2 (con’t) – Patriots (added UFA TE Alge Crumpler) – After cutting Chris Baker and letting Ben Watson leave via free agency, the Patriots had no experience at tight end. They now have some in Crumpler, who proved in Tennessee that he is no longer the receiving threat he was in Atlanta. But Crumpler is big, and he’s a good blocker, which could make him a fit in the Patriots’ offense. New England should still look for a young tight end, but Crumpler will fit in at least some sets.

2 (con’t) – Dolphins (added C Richie Incognito) – Incognito is a talent who is tempermental on the field and off, and that act wore thin on the Rams, who cut him. But his talent, physical play, and aggressiveness merits a second chance if he can get with the program in Miami. He’s good enough to start if everything falls in line.

1 – Seahawks (added UFA TE Chris Baker, UFA WR Sean Morey, LB Matt McCoy, WR Ruvell Martin, and RB Quinton Ganther) – Baker is a versatile tight end who isn’t great but who fits well as a backup to John Carlson for the Seahawks. Baker got a two-year, $4.75 million deal. Morey is a special-teams dynamo who will make a big difference in that area moving over from Arizona. McCoy played for new Seahawks defensive coordinator Gus Bradley in Tampa Bay the last two seasons. Martin and Ganther were non-tendered as restricted free agents by the Rams and Redskins, respectively.

1 (con’t) – Buccaneers (added UFA S Sean Jones and LB Jon Alston; kept UFA LB Angelo Crowell and WR Mark Bradley) – Jones was once a great prospect for the Browns, but he left Cleveland and then spent one mediocre year in Philly. Jones has talent to help the Bucs at a problem position, but it remains to be seen whether he’ll actually live up to the promise. Still, he’s worth a look for a Bucs team that needs a ton of help. Alston was not tendered by the Raiders in the offseason despite starting eight games over the past two years. He adds depth to the Bucs’ linebacking corps. Crowell missed last season with an injury, but if he can return to his Buffalo form, he could help the Bucs. Bradley showed some potential in Kansas City, and that led the Bucs to bring him back even though he wasn’t tendered a restricted free-agent offer.

1 (con’t) – Vikings (kept UFA DT Jimmy Kennedy) – Kennedy, like Ryan Pickett a former Rams first-round bust, found a home as the third defensive tackle in Minnesota, and he opted for a two-year, $6 million contract to stay with the Vikings. He’s a key player for the Vikes who may be even more key if the StarCaps case goes against starting DTs Kevin and Pat Williams.

1 (con’t) – Panthers (kept UFA DE Tyler Brayton and OT Rob Pettiti; added CB Marcus Hudson) – Brayton, a former Raider first-round pick, became a sturdy run-stopping end for the Panthers, and they brought him back on a three-year deal to add experience to a defensive line that averaged 23.8 years of age before he was re-signed, according to Darin Gantt. Brayton doesn’t produce a huge pass rush, but he is a legitimate presence who keeps opponents from cheating in their blocking assignments. The Panthers didn’t tender Pettiti, whom they signed out of the UFL, as a restricted free agent, but they brought him back anyway. They signed Hudson, who was not tendered by the 49ers, to add depth at corner.

1 (con’t) – 49ers (added UFA CB Karl Paymah; kept UFA OT Barry Sims) – Sims is a good swing tackle who’s acceptable as a starter in a pinch, and that made him worth $2.1 million in 2010 to the Niners. Paymah is a fourth corner who can plug into the third spot in a pinch. He has good size, but his cover skills are spotty.

1 (con’t) – Bengals (kept UFA S Roy Williams; added WR Chris Davis) – Williams started for the Bengals last year before an injury sidelined him. He no longer has great range or coverage skills, but he’s still an asset against the run.

1 (con’t) – Colts (added OT Adam Terry) – The Colts, who added OG Andy Alleman previously, brought in Terry to continue the project of adding size to their offensive line. Terry, a five-year veteran who was not tendered a contract by the Ravens, missed the ’09 season with injury. He’s more of a third tackle who can fill in on both sides than a starting candidate, but he’ll help provide depth.

1 (con’t) – Eagles (added WRs Hank Baskett and Chad Hall) – Baskett (aka Mr. Kendra) comes back to Philly after a year in Indy marred by his gaffe on the onsides kick in the Super Bowl that proved devastating for the Colts. He’s a big receiver who won’t play much on offense but could help on special teams. Hall, a former Air Force player, is eligible to play now after completing his service requirement. He could end up being an under-the-radar prospect.

1 (con’t)- Lions (added LB Landon Johnson; kept DE Copeland Bryan and UFA S Marquand Manuel) – Manuel and Bryan (who was non-tendered as a restricted free agent) are depth players for Detroit. Johnson was released as a backup in Carolina, but he’s versatile and can provide depth at all three linebacker positions.

1 (con’t) – Bears (added CB Tim Jennings) – Jennings, a former second-round pick, never became a rotation corner in Indianapolis, and he wasn’t tendered a restricted-free-agent offer. But he could find a role as a third or fourth corner in the Bears’ cover-2 system, especially now that Nathan Vasher is out of Chicago.

1 (con’t) – Falcons (added S Matt Giordano) – Giordano was released by the Packers in the offseason, but he could find a home and a role with Atlanta, given the Falcons’ lack of depth in the secondary. Giordano is also an asset on special teams.

1 (con’t) – Saints (kept UFA LS Jason Kyle) – Kyle, a long-time Seahawk and Panther, got a Super Bowl ring as the Saints’ long-snapper last year. Now he gets a return engagement for another year. You don’t notice him, which is the ultimate compliment for a snapper.

1 (con’t) – Giants (added P Jy Bond) – Bond is another Australian Rules Football player trying to make the move to the NFL as a punter. He’s insurance in case the Giants can’t agree to a deal with long-time punter Jeff Feagles.

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Jersey Numbers: Defensive Backs

This is our final post in picking the best players at each position by jersey number. If you have quibbles, or want to add someone I forgot, leave a comment and we’ll update this post. Next, we’ll combine all of our posts to create our all-jersey number 2009 team.

We started this project with wide receivers in this post and then with tight ends in this post and quarterbacks in this post and running backs in this post and offensive linemen in this post and kickers/punters in this post and defensive linemen in this post and linebackers in this post. Now we move to defensive backs, who wear numbers between 20 and 49.

20 – Ed Reed, Ravens – This hasn’t been Reed’s best year because of injury, but he still has three interceptions and three forced fumbles in 11 games. No safety in the league has had more impact this decade than Reed, and the fact that he won the league’s defensive player of the year award in a year that his team didn’t make the playoffs speaks to his greatness. So he gets the nod over long-time standouts S Brian Dawkins of Denver and CB Ronde Barber of Tampa Bay. Other notable 20s: Mike Adams, Browns; Alan Ball, Cowboys; Atari Bigby, Packers; Ralph Brown, Cardinals; Antoine Cason, Chargers; Chris Gamble, Panthers; Randall Gay, Saints; Brent Grimes, Falcons; Nick Harper, Titans; Michael Johnson, Giants; David Jones, Bengals; Keenan Lewis, Steelers; T.J. Rushing, Colts; Anthony Smith, Jaguars; Keith Smith, 49ers; Craig Steltz, Bears; Justin Tryon, Redskins; Jonathan Wade, Rams; Donald Washington, Chiefs; Donte Whitner, Bills; Madieu Williams, Vikings

21 – Nnamdi Asomugha, Raiders – It’s an incredibly difficult call to go with Asomugha over Green Bay’s Charles Woodson, who is having an epic renaissance year in Green Bay. But while Woodson has eight interceptions, Asomugha has one pick and just four passes defensed because teams refuse to throw his way. That ultimate sign of respect ultimately gives Nnamdi the nod. Injured Colts S Bob Sanders, a former defensive player of the year, would be in this discussion were he able to stay healthy. Other notable 21s: Asher Allen, Vikings; O.J. Atogwe, Rams; Derek Cox, Jaguars; Vontae Davis, Dolphins; Andre’ Goodman, Broncos; Corey Graham, Bears; Joselio Hanson, Eagles; Mike Jenkins, Cowboys; Kelly Jennings, Seahawks; Dwight Lowery, Jets; Chris Owens, Falcons; Kenny Phillips, Giants; Sabby Piscitelli, Buccaneers; Brodney Pool, Browns; Antrel Rolle, Cardinals; Lardarius Webb, Ravens; John Wendling, Bills; Dante Wesley, Panthers

22 – Asante Samuel, Eagles – First in New England and now in Philadephia, Samuel has been and still is a top-level cornerback. His eight interceptions this year is the second-best total in his career, and he now has 34 in his career. Other notable 22s: Nate Clements, 49ers; Vincent Fuller, Titans; William Gay, Steelers; Chevis Jackson, Falcons; Johnathan Joseph, Bengals; Pat Lee, Packers; Brandon McDonald, Browns; Tracy Porter, Saints; Carlos Rogers, Redskins; Samari Rolle, Ravens; Benny Sapp, Vikings; Matt Ware, Cardinals; Terrence Wheatley, Patriots

23 – DeAngelo Hall, Redskins – It pains me to honor Hall, but he’s the best of the lot at a thinner number. Hall was OK in Atlanta and then awful in Oakland, but in D.C. he’s been pretty good. So he gets the nod over New England’s Leigh Bodden, a solid but unspectacular corner, declining CB Marcus Trufant of Seattle, and CB Dunta Robinson of Houston. Other notable 23s: Tyrone Carter, Steelers; Cedric Griffin, Vikings; Renaldo Hill, Broncos; Kevin Hobbs, Lions; Chris Houston, Falcons; Marcus Hudson, 49ers; Quentin Jammer, Chargers; Tim Jennings, Colts; Sherrod Martin, Panthers; Donnie Nickey, Titans; Dimitri Patterson, Eagles; Jermaine Phillips, Buccaneers; Hank Poteat, Browns; Mike Richardson, Chiefs; Corey Webster, Giants

24 – Darrelle Revis, Jets – Revis has had a breakout season as the preeminent lockdown corner in the league. So even though he wears the same number as all-time great CB Champ Bailey of Denver, stud safety Adrian Wilson of Arizona, and former Pro Bowl S Chris Hope of Tennessee, Revis is the obvious choice. Other notable 24s: Al Afalava, Bears; Ron Bartell, Rams; Sheldon Brown, Eagles; Jarrett Bush, Packers; Brandon Flowers, Chiefs; Dominique Foxworth, Ravens; Deon Grant, Seahawks; Tye Hill, Falcons; Michael Huff, Raiders; Dante Hughes, Chargers; Terrence McGee, Bills; Kalvin Pearson, Lions; Sean Smith, Dolphins; Ike Taylor, Steelers; Terrell Thomas, Giants; Leigh Torrance, Saints; Jonathan Wilhite, Patriots; Eric Wright, Browns

25 – Ryan Clark, Steelers – In a battle of former teammates, we’ll go with hard-hitting strong safety Clark over CB Bryant McFadden, who left Pittsburgh to play corner for Arizona in the offseason. Clark doesn’t get the hype that his teammate Troy Polamalu does, but he’s a good player who really fits into the attitude of the Pittsburgh defense. Other notable 25s: Will Allen, Dolphins; Kevin Barnes, Redskins; Tarell Brown, 49ers; Chris Carr, Ravens; Pat Chung, Patriots; Kevin Ellison, Chargers; Nick Ferguson, Texans; Coye Francies, Browns; Danny Gorrer, Rams; Bruce Johnson, Giants; Tyrell Johnson, Vikings; Ellis Lankster, Bills; William Moore, Falcons; Reggie Nelson, Jaguars; Jerraud Powers, Colts; Kerry Rhodes, Jets; Aqib Talib, Buccaneers; Morgan Trent, Bengals; Pat Watkins, Cowboys; Marvin White, Lions

26 – Antoine Winfield, Vikings – Winfield is not just a great cover corner; he also hits with the tenacity of a safety. Even though he’s missed several games this season, we’ll give him the nod. So he gets the nod over fine Lions rookie S Louis Delmas. Other notable 26s: Will Allen, Buccaneers; Josh Bell, Packers; Michael Coe, Jaguars; Erik Coleman, Falcons; Abram Elam, Browns; Ken Hamlin, Cowboys; Kelvin Hayden, Colts; Sean Jones, Eagles; Kevin Kaesviharn, Titans; Dawan Landry, Ravens; Ty Law, Broncos; Mark Roman, 49ers; Stanford Routt, Raiders; Lito Sheppard, Eagles; Quinton Teal, Panthers; DeShea Townsend, Steelers; Eugene Wilson, Texans; Josh Wilson, Seahawks; Ashton Youboty, Bills

27 – Rashean Mathis, Jaguars – He doesn’t get a lot of attention because he plays in front of empty seats, but Mathis is a terrific cover corner. He gets the nod over two safeties, Jordan Babineaux of the Seahawks and Philadelphia’s Quintin Mikell. Other notable 27s: Michael Adams, Cardinals; Kyle Arrington, Patriots; Will Blackmon, Packers; Daniel Bullocks, Lions; Joe Burnett, Steelers; Reggie Corner, Bills; Torrie Cox, Buccaneers; Jamaal Fudge, Falcons; Cletis Gordon, Cowboys; Walt Harris, 49ers; Malcolm Jenkins, Saints; Jacob Lacey, Colts; Paul Oliver, Chargers; David Roach, Rams; Fred Smoot, Redskins; Nick Sorensen, Browns; Donald Strickland, Jets; C.J. Wilson, Panthers

28 – Gibril Wilson, Dolphins – Wilson was a safety on the Giants’ Super Bowl champion team, and then got a contract that was too big from the Raiders. But the Raiders cut him after the season, and Wilson found a great home in Miami. Other notable 28s: Darius Butler, Patriots; Thomas DeCoud, Falcons; Steve Gregory, Chargers; Marlin Jackson, Colts; Leodis McKelvin, Bills; Antwuan Molden, Texans; Curtis Taylor, 49ers; Greg Toler, Cardinals; Usama Young, Saints; Tom Zbikowski, Ravens

29 – Leon Hall, Bengals – Hall has been the breakout corner of the season, as he and Johnathan Joseph have given the Bengals a terrific pair of corners. Hall has five picks and 20 passes defensed this season. He gets the nod over Arizona’s Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, another good young corner. Other notable 29s: Tyrone Culver, Dolphins; Drayton Florence, Bills; Lendy Holmes, Redskins; D.J. Johnson, Giants; Eric King, Lions; Derrick Martin, Packers; Marcus McCauley, Saints; William Middleton, Jaguars; Ryan Mouton, Texans; Ryan Mundy, Steelers; Glover Quin, Texans; Derrick Roberson, Buccaneers; Shawn Springs, Patriots; Brian Williams, Falcons; Cary Williams, Ravens

30 – Mike Brown, Chiefs – At a popular safety number, Brown gets the nod with his renaissance season in Kansas City. He has stayed healthy all season after injury problems plagued him in three of his last five years in Chicago. So he earns the choice over Charles Godfrey of Carolina, LaRon Landry of Washington, and Brandon McGowan of the Patriots. Other notable 30s: David Bruton, Broncos; Chris Clemons, Dolphins; Drew Coleman, Jets; Gerard Lawson, Browns; Jason McCourty, Titans; D.J. Moore, Bears; Geoffrey Pope, Eagles; Ko Simpson, Lions; Reggie Smith, 49ers

31 – Cortland Finnegan, Titans – If Antoine Winfield isn’t the most physical corner in the league, Finnegan is. He’s vital to the Titans’ defense and their strong second half of the season. So he gets the nod over rookie sensation Jarius Byrd of Buffalo and corners Antonio Cromartie of San Diego and Al Harris of Green Bay. Other notable 31s: Dre’ Bly, 49ers; Phillip Buchanon, Lions; Hiram Eugene, Raiders; Ellis Hobbs, Eagles; Justin King, Rams; Maurice Leggett, Chiefs; Ken Lucas, Seahawks; Richard Marshall, Panthers; Darcel McBath, Broncos; Brandon Meriweather, Patriots; Bernard Pollard, Texans; Pierson Prioleau, Saints; Aaron Ross, Giants; Scott Starks, Jaguars; Nathan Vasher, Bears; Fabian Washington, Redskins; Roy Williams, Bengals

32 – Eric Weddle, Chargers – At a tough number to call, we’ll give Weddle, a key player in the Chargers’ defense, a nod over CB Jabari Greer of New Orleans and big-money safety Michael Lewis of San Francisco. Other notable 32s: Jason Allen, Dolphins; Fred Bennett, Texans; Anthony Henry, Lions; Orlando Scandrick, Cowboys

33 – Charles Tillman, Bears – Tillman isn’t a premier cover corner, but he’s pretty good in coverage. He’s also a good tackler and great a punching the ball out, as his six forced fumbles attest. He gets the nod over Raiders SS Tyvon Branch, who has a ridiculous 110 tackles this season. Other notable 33s: Melvin Bullitt, Colts; Michael Griffin, Titans; Nate Jones, Dolphins; Elbert Mack, Buccaneers; Jamarca Sanford, Vikings; Alphonso Smith, Broncos; Eric Smith, Jets; Brandon Underwood, Packers

34 – Dominique Barber, Texans – At a thin number, Barber, a part-time starter at safety for the Texans, gets the nod over Mike McKenzie, a long-time solid pro who recently re-signed with the Saints. Other notable 34s: Marquice Cole, Jets; Travis Daniels, Chiefs; Kyries Hebert, Bengals; Roy Lewis, Seahawks; Mike Mitchell, Raiders; Byron Westbrook, Redskins

35 – Zack Bowman, Bears – Bowman took over as a starting cornerback in Chicago, replacing Nathan Vasher. He gets the nod over rookie safety Macho Harris of the Eagles. Other notable 35s: Kevin Dockery, Giants; Todd Johnson, Bills; Jacques Reeves, Texans

36 – Nick Collins, Packers – Collins is a terrific safety for the Packers, and he gets the edge over another safety, Tanard Jackson of Tampa Bay, because Jackson missed four games due to suspension earlier this year. Collins has six picks this year, while Jackson has four. Other notable 36s: Jamar Adams, Seahawks; Josh Barrett, Broncos; Josh Bullocks, Bears; Quincy Butler, Rams; Courtney Greene, Jaguars; Mike Hamlin, Cowboys; Brandon Hughes, Chargers; Jim Leonhard, Jets; Lawyer Milloy, Seahawks; James Sanders, Patriots; Shawntae Spencer, 49ers

37 – Yeremiah Bell, Dolphins – Bell is a solid starting safety for the Dolphins, and his tackle total (103) is among the tops for defensive backs across the NFL. So we opt for Bell over George Wilson, another tackling machine playing safety for Buffalo, and Raiders CB Chris Johnson. Other notable 37s: James Butler, Rams; Sean Considine, Jaguars; Reed Doughty, Redskins; Eric Frampton, Vikings; Roderick Hood, Titans; Anthony Madison, Steelers; Chip Vaughn, Saints

38 – Dashon Goldson, 49ers – Goldson is emerging as not just a starter at free safety but as an impact player for the Niners. He gets the nod over Packers CB Tramon Williams and Bears S-CB Danieal Manning. Other notable 38s: Brandon Anderson, Buccaneers; DeMarcus Faggans, Texans; Bret Lockett, Patriots; DaJuan Morgan, Chiefs; Mark Parson, Texans; Charlie Peprah, Falcons; Ramzee Robinson, Browns

39 – Brandon Carr, Chiefs – Carr has started all 30 games at cornerback for the Chiefs since he entered in the NFL as a 2008 fifth-round pick. He gets picked on a bit because Brandon Flowers is emerging as a good corner on the opposite side, but Carr has broken up 16 passes this year. Other notable 39s: Husain Abdullah, Vikings; Quintin Demps, Eagles; Trevor Ford, Packers; Chris Reis, Saints; DeAngelo Smith, Lions

40 – Marquand Manuel, Lions – Manuel has bounced around a lot, but he has been a starter in all but one of his six NFL stops. This year in Detroit, he started six of the nine games he played before going on injured reserve. Other notable 40s: John Busing, Texans; K.J. Gerard, Ravens; Jamie Silva, Colts

41 – Antoine Bethea, Colts – Bethea, the Colts’ starting free safety, has had to be the one constant in the secondary for the Colts this year, and he’s played his role well with 90 tackles and four interception. He gets the nod over Cowboys CB Terrence Newman, Saints S Roman Harper, and Bengals S Chinedum Ndukwe. Other notable 41s: Tyron Brackenridge, Jaguars; C.C. Brown, Giants; Antoine Harris, Falcons; William James, Lions; Corey Lynch, Buccaneers; Brice McCain, Texans; Kareem Moore, Redskins; Captain Munnerlyn, Panthers; Evan Oglesby, Dolphins; Karl Paymah, Vikings; C.J. Spillman, Chargers; Raymond Ventrone, Browns; Frank Walker, Ravens

42 –Darren Sharper, Saints – Sharper’s veteran leadership has helped the Saints stabilized their secondary, and the veteran continues to make plenty of plays. He has eight picks this year, three of which he’s returned for touchdowns, and now 62 career interceptions. Other notable 42s: Gerald Alexander, Jaguars; Chris Crocker, Bengals; Brian Russell, Texans; Jack Williams, Lions

43 – Troy Polamalu, Steelers -Polamalu has been hurt much of the year this year, but his ability to range and make plays is what takes the Steelers defense from good to great. He may miss the Pro Bowl for the first time since his rookie season, but he still gets the nod here in a walk. Other notable 43s: Craig Dahl, Rams; Aaron Francisco, Colts; Chris Harris, Panthers; Hakuri Nakamura, Ravens; Tom Nelson, Bengals; Bryan Scott, Bills; Gerald Sensabaugh, Cowboys

44 – Jarrad Page, Chiefs – Page was in his third season as a starting safety in K.C. before going on injured reserve after playing five games this season. Still, that’s a better resume than that of Kevin Payne, who has lost his starting safety job with the Bears. Other notable 44s: James Ihedigbo, Jets; Rico Murray, Bengals

45 – De’von Hall, Colts – Hall, an undrafted rookie out of Utah State, has seen action in four games in his rookie season, notching three tackles. He is the only active defensive back wearing 45.

46 – none

47 – Jon McGraw, Chiefs – McGraw is in his eighth season, and he has started seven games for Kansas City this season, which is a career high. He also recorded his first career sack this season. His long career of contributing gives him the nod over rookie Cary Harris of Buffalo and fourth-year man Matt Giordano of Green Bay.

48 – Chris Horton, Redskins – Horton, a second-year player out of UCLA, emerged as a starter in his rookie season but fell out of the lineup before a midseason injury stopped his sophomore campaign. He is the only notable DB wearing 48.

49 – Rashad Johnson, Cardinals – Johnson, a third-round pick out of Arizona, is the only active defensive back wearing 49. He has not seen action this year.

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Vikings/Steelers thoughts

A few thoughts on the Week 7 game between the Minnesota Vikings and the Pittsburgh Steelers, both from an on-field perspective and a fantasy football perspective. The Steelers took advantage of two defensive touchdowns to hand the Vikings their first loss 27-17.

On-field perspective
*Playing without CB Antoine Winfield will really hurt the Vikings. They looked really vulnerable late in last week’s game against the Ravens, and this week the Steelers were able to find some holes in the secondary, especially to rookie Mike Wallace. Winfield’s absence is especially noticeable because the depth with Benny Sapp, Karl Paymah, and rookie Asher Allen is less than ideal.
*The Steelers are now a pass-first team, not a run-first team. They showed as much on a third-quarter possession where they got first-and-goal at the 8-yard line and tried two passes (along with a busted play). The next time the Steelers got an and-goal situation, Rashard Mendenhall fumbled on first down after diving to get over the 5-yard line, not the goal line. Ben Roethlisberger is having a great year, and that’s not just a benefit for the Steelers – it’s a necessity. They can’t win without him moving the ball via the air.
*Mendenhall has taken over as the Steelers’ running back, and that’s not really a good thing. Mendenhall’s straight-up running style isn’t ideal for inside runs, and he’s lacking as a blocker and a receiver. He’s just not a special back. He looked good on off-tackle runs and tosses against the Vikes but not so great on inside runs. His total of 69 yards on 10 carries shows that lack of consistency. The difference between Mendenhall and an elite back like Adrian Peterson is staggering. Even the old-school Steelers combo of Fast Willie Parker and the Bus Jerome Bettis offered much more than Mendenhall can at this point.
*While the Steelers are a pass-first team, the most special thing Vikings is Peterson. When he gets going, he can carry the team. Plus, he can run over guys, like he did with William Gay in the two-minute drill at the end of the game. He’s the X-factor that takes the Vikings from good to great. Brett Favre (aka Spanx) can’t carry the team, although he can help. But Favre needs to be the spice, not the entree. The fact that the Vikings threw twice on and-goal plays from the 1-yard-line in the third quarter (and had to settle for a field goal) is almost criminal. Then Favre’s fumble in the red zone in the fourth quarter led to Lamarr Woodley’s defensive touchdown. The Steelers’ second defensive TD by Keyaron Fox wasn’t Favre’s fault, but the first was.
*One of the most fascinating things about the game was Favre’s propensity to look for rookie Percy Harvin on third-down plays. He targeted Harvin on at least six third-down throws in the first half, and it paid off with a 28-yard gain that sparked the Vikes’ first scoring drive. That’s a vital role for a guy with just seven games of pro experience, but it speaks to how dangerous and prepared Harvin truly is. Harvin isn’t just a dangerous kickoff returner, as he showed with his second return TD of the season, he’s also an effective receiver.
*Wide receiver Bernard Berrian was a big-money signee by the Vikings just two offseasons ago, but he’s becoming less and less relevant in the offense. He had fallen behind Harvin and Sidney Rice in the receiving pecking order even before he suffered a first-half hamstring injury. The Vikings look to Berrian scheme-wise to try to get a big play out of him, and he’s capable of doing that, but they don’t appear to rely on him on conversion plays. That’s the role of a speciality player, not a stalwart. It’s not a coincidence that Rice had 11 catches for 136 yards, not to mention a touchdown that was called back, because Rice is the Vikings’ No. 1 wideout.
*Vikings DT Kevin Williams might be the most underrated defensive tackle in the league. We hear a lot about DE Jared Allen, who is a force, while we lump Kevin in with Pat as the Williams wall. Pat Williams is a big run-stuffer, but Kevin Williams is more than that. He’s a penetrator inside who can also make plays in space. Don’t sleep on him.
*On the other side of the ledger, it’s clear that S Troy Polamalu is what makes the Steelers’ secondary special. When he was out, Pittsburgh looked vulnerable. But with Polamalu back in there, there’s suddenly fewer holes and more danger for opposing passing games. That’s the sign of an impact player.
*One young player who adds a lot to the Pittsburgh offense is rookie wideout Wallace, who had 91 total yards and a touchdown. Wallace has speed and he’s already proving to be dependable in big spots. It seems like he makes big plays every week, as he did twice in the two-minute drill at the end of the first half. He’s an outstanding third receiver for Pittsburgh.
*Minnesota has two rookies playing prominent roles in Harvin and ORT Phil Loadholt, who is very appropriately named. Loadholt and Bryant McKinnie, his fellow tackle, take gigantic to another level. But the best player on the line is OLG Steve Hutchinson, whose false-start penalty in the fourth quarter was his first flag in 27 games. That’s consistency from a guy who’s also a great blocker for the run and the pass. No wonder the Vikings made him the highest-paid guard in the league.

Fantasy Football perspective
*While we don’t like Mendenhall’s running style, as long as he’s the starter he’s still a top-25 running back. He’s going to compile enough numbers to be a solid fantasy starter, but you can’t count on him to carry your team.
*Roethlisberger is a top-10 fantasy quarterback, while Favre is outside of that tier. Favre threw for 334 yards in this game, but that total was padded by two late drives in comeback mode. Meanwhile, Roethlisberger’s solid day was probably about as bad a fantasy day as he can have, and if that’s the case he’s a solid starter.
*What we’re seeing about Berrian’s role should be a big red flag to fantasy owners, even bigger than his injury in this game. At this point, I’d take both Rice and Harvin over Berrian in fantasy leagues – and that would be the case even if Berrian were healthy.
*For Pittsburgh, Hines Ward and Santonio Holmes remain above Wallace in the fantasy pecking order, but Wallace is a top-40 wideout going forward. He’s a nice sleeper play, especially against a bad passing D or a defense who is missing a major player like the Vikings’ was. Ward didn’t have a big game in this one, while Holmes had 59 yards.
*We raved about TEs Heath Miller of Pittsburgh and Visanthe Shiancoe of Minnesota in this post last week. Even though neither had a huge game in this one, we stick by our recommendations of both to fantasy owners.

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FR: Free agency weekly review pt. 3

Another week, and a bunch more moves on the NFL landscape. Here’s a review of the moves from March 14-20 in comparison to each other. The 10 level is reserved for the team that made the most important signings of the week; the 1 level is reserved for a team that’s merely worth mentioning this week. Click on the following links for comparisons of the opening weekend, week 1, and week 2 moves.

10 – Saints (add S Darren Sharper, DE Paul Spicer and C Nick Leckey; kept WR-RS Courtney Roby) – The Saints still have major secondary needs, so Sharper’s leadership and veteran wiles are vital. He’s the NFL’s active leader in interceptions with 54. Spicer, who spent 10 years with the Jaguars, still can be a spot pass rusher and is worth a 1-year deal. Leckey started 10 games in Arizona last year and can fit in on the line. Roby fits in as a return option for New Orleans.

9 – Browns (add OT John St. Clair, LB Eric Barton, OG Floyd Womack, CB Corey Ivy, and RB Noah Herron) – St. Clair is a former first-round bust in St. Louis who emerged as a decent right tackle in Chicago. He got a deal worth $9 million over three years to be the bookend to stud OLT Joe Thomas. Barton has lost not just one but a few steps, but he knows Eric Mangini’s defense and may still be able to play at least on running downs. Womack, who has one of the league’s greatest nicknames — Pork Chop — played both guard and tackle in his nine years in Seattle. He’s an ideal 6th lineman who can also start and do OK. Ivy was Baltimore’s nickel back last year, and he played well in that role. He should fill a similar role in Cleveland.

8 – Ravens (add TE L.J. Smith and CB-RS Chris Carr) – Smith had a bad year in Philadelphia in ’08, largely because of injury, but he’s a dangerous pass catcher when healthy. The Ravens hope having either Todd Heap or Smith healthy will give them a middle-of-the-field threat. At $1.5 million for one year, Smith is kind of a pricy insurance policy. Carr is an underrated player who really emerged in Tennessee last year. He’s a dynamic returner, and he proved he could also contribute as a nickel back for the Titans. Given the overhaul the Ravens are doing at cornerback, Carr could be a very important player for them. He looks to fit in behind Dominique Foxworth (another addition) and Fabian Washington as Baltimore’s No. 3 corner.

7 – Patriots (add WR Joey Galloway and OL Al Johnson; kept DE Mike Wright, OT Wesley Britt and S Tank Williams) – Galloway was ineffective last year because of injury, but he was quietly dangerous in Tampa Bay in the two seasons before that. He’s a veteran who could fit in beautifully as an outside receiver opposite Randy Moss and beside Wes Welker, but Galloway will have to beat out Greg Lewis for that spot. In any case, the Patriots have improved their depth at receiver. Johnson is an interior lineman who was in Miami last year. Wright is a rotation defensive end who got a 4-year, $7.2 million deal to remain in New England.

6 – Raiders (add OT Khalif Barnes; kept C Chris Morris) – Barnes only got a one-year deal to move to the bay from Jacksonville, which is why this move isn’t higher. But he’s a talented player who is still trying to prove he can be an elite left tackle in the NFL. He’ll be a certain starter in Oakland.

5 – Cardinals (add RB Jason Wright, NT Rodney Leslie, TE Anthony Becht, and C Donovan Raiola; kept OLB Clark Haggans, DE Bertrand Berry and OG Elton Brown) – Wright, who got 2 years and $2 million on his new deal, replaces J.J. Arrington as Arizona’s third-down back. That’s the proper role for him. Leslie is a wide load who can play nose tackle as the Cards move to a 3-4 defense. He probably should be a backup and not a starter, but he’s a good option to have around. Becht is a block-first tight end who provides insurance in case Stephen Spach can’t return from his playoff knee injury. Haggans and Berry got one-year deals to stick around. Berry is a good citizen and team leader who can still get to the passer on occasion. Haggans played in Pittsburgh for eight years and should be an asset as the Cardinals seek to move to a 3-4 defense modeled after the Steelers’ D. Brown has started in the past but is more of a backup type.

5 (con’t) – Buccaneers (add LB Angelo Crowell) – Crowell missed the entire ’08 season with injury but was a productive linebacker in Buffalo before then. He’s vital in helping the Bucs replace ousted outside ‘backers Derrick Brooks and Cato June.

5 (con’t) – Chiefs (add LB Monty Beisel and WRs Bobby Engram and Terrance Copper) – Engram fits in as a possession receiver across from Dwayne Bowe, who is emerging as a quality No. 1 receiver. Engram didn’t do much last year because of injury, but he had a great ’07 season. Copper, meanwhile, will probably fit in more on special teams than on offense. Beisel will help new defensive coordinator Clancy Pendergast install his new offense. Beisel was a Chief from ’01 to ’04 but spent last season in Arizona with Pendergast and new head coach Todd Haley. This is another offseason move dedicated to getting a veteran hand who can help install and teach a new system.

4 – Redskins (add DE Renaldo Wynn; kept PK Shaun Suisham) – Wynn, a Redskin from ’02 to ’06, returns from the Giants on a one-year deal to provide defensive line depth.

3 – Titans (add WR-RS Mark Jones) – Jones moves from Carolina to replace Chris Carr as Tennessee’s primary returner. Jones brought more juice to the Panthers’ return game last year than Carolina had seen since Steve Smith was in that role, so he’ll help in Tennessee.

3 (con’t) – Eagles (add FB Leonard Weaver) – Weaver is the prototypical West Coast offense fullback. He can block pretty well, catch the ball a little, and run short-yardage plays in a pinch. He was actually on the field for more than 50 percent of Seattle’s offensive snaps last year, but with Mike Holmgren retiring, the offense was going to change enough to limit Weaver’s touches. He’ll step in and be a solid complement to Brian Westbrook in Philly, and he’ll make a play or two along the way as well. Weaver is a role player well worth a 1-year, $1.75 million deal.

2- Vikings (add CB Karl Paymah and WR-RS Glenn Holt) – Paymah moves from Denver on a one-year, $1.55 million deal to contribute as a backup corner and a special-teams dynamo. Holt will help on special teams too; he’s a quality returner who will keep the Vikings from having to use Bernard Berrian in that position.

2 (con’t) – Jets (add Marques Douglas; kept S Abram Elam and CB Ahmad Carroll) – Douglas is another ex-Raven who can play defensive end in new head coach Rex Ryan’s system. He’ll be a backup who plays in a rotation. The Jets kept Elam by matching a 1-year, $1.5 million offer sheet he had signed with Cleveland. Elam can backup both safety spots, and he played well last year. Carroll is a former first-round pick who might have finally found a home after latching on with the Jets last year.

1 – Bills (add LB Pat Thomas) – With Angelo Crowell leaving, the Bills needed to add a veteran linebacker who could start. Thomas opened nine games last year in Kansas City, so he fits that bill.

1 (con’t) – Packers (kept CB Jarrett Bush and DE Mike Montgomery) – The Packers matched an offer sheet from the Titans to keep Bush, but it’s strange to picture them paying $4.5 million over three years for a backup corner. Bush will need to at least be a nickel back for this contract to make sense for Green Bay. Montgomery was a backup defensive tackle last year, but he’ll likely become an end in the Packers’ new 3-4 scheme.

1 (con’t) – Broncos (add OG Scott Young; kept TE Jeb Putzier) – Young was a backup with Philadelphia and should fill a similar role in Denver. Putzier could be an important retention because the Broncos are shopping pass-catching TE Tony Scheffler. Putzier can catch OK but is more of a blocker, which will be more important in the new offense that rookie head coach Josh McDaniels is installing.

1 (con’t) Lions (add TE Will Heller) – Heller’s a block-first tight end who will help the running game but won’t catch much at all. He comes from Seattle to replace John Owens, who went from Detroit to Seattle.

1 (con’t) – Steelers (kept OG Trai Essex, CB Fernando Bryant and LB Arnold Harrison) – Bryant is an established vet who didn’t play much after signing in Pittsburgh in the middle of last season. The hope is that, with training camp under his belt, he can serve as an effective backup. Essex signed a two-year deal, which is important because so many Steelers linemen are still free agents.

Seahawks (kept LB D.D. Lewis) – backup and special teamer

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