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Moss tossed

Randy Moss

Someone finally found a way to upstage Brett Favre’s drama. Instead of focusing on the same old will-he-or-won’t-he drama about Favre playing this week, Vikings fans will instead focus on WR Randy Moss, whose ballyhooed return to Minnesota ended after four games with him being left in Boston after a loss to the Patriots and subsequently released. His four-game return to the Vikings was hardly a renaissance, resulting in just 13 catches for 174 yards and two touchdowns. Moss had just one catch for eight yards Sunday against the Patriots, and after the game he went off on a bizarre rant that blamed Vikings leadership for, well, everything.

So what does this mean for the Vikings now ? (Besides the fact that they flushed a third-round pick on four games of Moss, of course.) It means that the offense needs Sidney Rice back, for one thing. Rice can be a downfield threat who will open things up for interior targets Visanthe Shiancoe and Percy Harvin, who is far better out of the slot than on the outside. It means that Brett Favre’s dream of playing with Randy Moss, which was one of the fissures between Favre and the Packers.

Most of all, it completely destroys head coach Brad Childress’ credibility. Childress has been Favre’s chauffer/caddy over the past two seasons, but the moment Moss spoke out, Childress cut him as “the kind of guy we don’t want here.” What has Moss done that’s so different from Favre’s diva tantrums? The two players are cut from the same cloth – both supremely talented, both with impressive resumes, and both with egos commensurate with their fame. How can Childress coddle Favre (and that is what he has done, largely) and cut Moss? Or, if last week’s comments about Favre’s performance are Childress’ way of trying to retake control of his team, how will players respond to their soft touch of a coach suddenly trying to be heavy handed? I’m not surprised that players told Jay Glazer that “Guys just shook their heads” when Childress announced Moss’ release in a meeting.

It’s over in Minnesota. Favre is hurt, and whether he keeps playing or not bears little on what success the Vikings will have the rest of the season. And our hunch is that it’s over for Childress too, who will lose the locker room with the divergence of his approach to Favre and Moss.

As for Moss, it’ll be fascinating to see where he ends up via waivers. We’ll discuss his future once we know where he ends up, likely on Tuesday.

And in New England, Bill Belichick is chuckling, knowing he comes out the big winner in this whole episode, with the prize of a third-round draft pick in his pocket.

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FR: New and moved announcers for 2010

Last year we started a tradition of comparing the new announcers added to the roster of major national outlets for the NFL season. (Here’s last year’s post.) In this comparison, we’ll compare the importance of new hires, major movers, and some guys who added side jobs this season. The 10 level indicates the announcers with the best chance of making a national splash; the 1 level is for announcers who you probably won’t even notice in 2010.

10 – Jim Mora, Fox – The younger of the coaches named Mora, who was the Seahawks’ head coach last year, will move onto Fox’s No. 3 announcing team with Dick Stockton and Charles Davis. That’s a soft landing spot for Mora, because Davis is a pro who will allow Mora to feel comfortable finding things to say instead of forcing out comments after every play. But Mora will face the challenge that all former coaches have – especially those who have dreams of coaching once again. Can he be critical? Can he be honest? Or will he pull punches in an effort to avoid making enemies? Mora has the gumption to be honest, and if he does he could develop a la Brian Billick. But if Mora doesn’t do so, it’ll be incredibly easy for Fox to move him down the roster – or off it entirely. Still, Mora has the privilege of one of the higher profile new announcing gigs.

9 – none

8 – Kurt Warner, Fox – The recently retired Warner, who has done some Arena League games for NFL network this summer, takes the route of many high-profile quarterbacks and lands in announcing. But unlike many of those QBs, instead of starting in a high-profile studio role or top game-announcer, he’s starting at the bottom of the national totem pole. He takes over for Trent Green on Fox’s No. 7 team, which means he’ll only work selected weeks when Fox has a full game slate. That may actually be a blessing for Warner as he seeks to develop as an announcer. This role will give him room to grow and make mistakes without being in the national glare, and if he emerges he certainly has the street cred to move up the charts quickly. But Warner is also close enough to the bottom of Fox’s roster that, if he struggles, he can be cut without much notice. So Warner must show signs of ability quickly, or else he’ll be looking for a new post-retirement career.

7 – none

6 – none

5 – Joe Theismann, NFL Network – Theismann, who for years irritated viewers with his verbose and grandiose declarations of the most obvious things on Sunday Night Football, joins the NFL Network’s booth for Thurdsay-night and Saturday-night games. It’s an annoying addition, not just because Theismann is terrible, but because the Bob Papa/Matt Millen team ended up being pretty good last year. Millen actually has insight about what’s happening on the field, while Theismann doesn’t seem to see inside the game. His performance in an NBC wild-card playoff game last year was awful, yet it somehow got him another gig. If NFL Network wanted a third man in the booth, they had much better options on their roster – Marshall Faulk, Steve Mariucci, Warren Sapp, Tom Waddle, just to name a few. This move makes no sense, and we can only hope it’s short-lived.

4 – Antonio Pierce, ESPN – After a nine-year career with the Redskins and Giants that included a Super Bowl win and a Pro Bowl bid, Pierce hung up his cleats to join ESPN’s roster of analysts. He’ll appear on NFL Live, SportsCenter, and ESPNEWS and also contribute to ESPN’s web and radio platforms in New York. It’ll be hard for Pierce to establish a role nationally on ESPN’s crowded roster, but his years under the New York media spotlight have polished him to the point that he’ll look good on camera. As always, having a player who’s competed against most guys he’s analyzing is also a plus – if the player can be honest. Only time will tell if Pierce clears that hurdle, but if he does he could have a bright future in the business.

3 – Brad Nessler and Trent Dilfer, Monday Night Football – For the fourth straight year, ESPN will open its Monday Night Football schedule with a doubleheader. For the past three years, the late game has been called by Mike Greenberg and Mike Golic, along with either Mike Ditka or Steve Young. But Greenberg isn’t the smoothest play-by-play guy, and the radio duo’s penchant for going topical irritated fans. So this year, ESPN will go to veteran play-by-play man Brad Nessler, who spends most of the fall on college football, for the game. He’ll pair with Trent Dilfer, an NFL Live analyst who has shown a penchant for incisive, insightful, and strong commentary. We’re excited to see Dilfer in the role, because we admire his talents and wish he had an even more high-profile role. This is his chance to show he can be a top-flight game analyst.

2 – Spero Dedes, CBS – Dedes has moved into CBS’s play-by-play roster for the NFL this year, working on a No. 6 team. Dedes also worked the NCAA Tournament for CBS, and he’s best known as a Lakers announcer. In recent years, he has hosted NFL Network’s Gameday Morning, but Rich Eisen moves from postgame to take over those pregame duties.

1 – Jay Glazer and Daryl Johnston, NFL Network – Glazer and Johnston, both Fox staples, are adding NFL Total Access duties to their repretoire. Both will be studio analysts for the NFL Network show. We include them here just for the sake of the record.

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