Tag Archives: jay feely

Crazy Kicker of Week 14

Jay Feely scores, via espn.com

It took most of the season, but we finally had a kicker find the end zone in Week 14. Jay Feely of the Cardinals lined up for a 23-yard field goal attempt late in the first half of Arizona’s game against the Broncos. But instead of placing the ball for Feely to kick it, holder Ben Graham tapped the ball on the ground and then pitched it behind him to Feely, who was motioning right and went around the right side and snuck into the end zone for a five-yard scoring rush. The touchdown gave the Cardinals a 13-3 lead en route to a 43-13 win. Feely added a five field goals, including a 55-yarder, for an extra dose of craziness.

For his scoring scamper, Feely is the Crazy Kicker of the Week.

2010 Crazy Kickers of the Week
CFL: WR Dave Stala, Tiger-Cats
Preseason Week 1: P Brett Kern, Titans
Preseason Week 2: PK Robbie Gould, Bears
Week 2: PK/Kickoff Rob Bironas, Titans
Week 5: Punter/holder Dustin Colquitt, Chiefs
Week 7: Punter Reggie Hodges, Browns
Week 8: Punter Steve Weatherford, Jets
Week 9: DT/PK Ndamukong Suh, Lions
Week 10: PK Phil Dawson, Browns
Week 11: Punter Mike Scifres, Chargers
Week 13: PK/Punter Shaun Suisham, Steelers
Week 14: PK Jay Feely, Cardinals

Leave a comment

Filed under Crazy Kicker of the Week, Football Relativity

FR: April pre-draft signings

In this post, we’re comparing signings between the beginning of April and the NFL draft. For previous signings in free agency, go to the March signings post and work your way back. We’re using a comparison in which 10 marks the team with the most noteworthy moves and 1 indicates the team with barely noteworthy moves.

10 – Jets (added UFA OLB Jason Taylor) – Taylor is a specialty player at this point as a 3-4 outside pass rusher, but he had seven sacks in that role last year and should be able to shine in Rex Ryan’s attacking scheme. He got a two-year deal nominally worth $13 million, but in reality it’s a one-year deal worth up to $3.75 million with a bunch of funny money in the second year. Taylor will help the Jets continue to gear up for a major run at a championship this year. And his Dancing with the Stars-inspired acting career won’t suffer from a year in the Big Apple, either.

9 – none

8 – Saints (added DE Alex Brown and UFA DT Jimmy Wilkerson) – Brown was cut in Chicago after Julius Peppers landed there, and now he makes his way to New Orleans. There, he’ll take the spot of former first-round disappointment Charles Grant. Brown is a pretty good (but not great) defensive end who can rush the passer and stop the run, and he’s better than any other defensive end on the market in April – by a lot. For the Saints to get him was a coup that came at a reasonable two-year, $5.5 million price. That’s fair but not excessive starter money. Wilkerson got a one-year, $2 million deal even though he’s recovering from an ACL injury. If he gets healthy, he’ll be a fine second or third tackle who can help stabilize the interior of the Saints’ defense.

7 – Vikings (added CB Lito Sheppard) – Sheppard has bounced around the last couple of years, after being dissatisfied in Philly and falling out of favor with the Jets. But he’s still a pretty good player who will help a Vikings secondary that’s probably the weak link on an otherwise stacked team. Sheppard can’t play man-on-man coverage all day long, but he can be a dependable cog in a strong defense, and that’s exactly what the Vikings have. So getting Sheppard for $2 million over one year is a coup for the Vikes.

6 – Patriots (added WR Torry Holt, DT Damione Lewis and P David King) – Holt had an OK but not spectacular season in Jacksonville last year, and he’s definitely falling off from his Greatest Show on Turf days. Holt will get up to $1.7 million this year, which is a fair price for a veteran receiver, but you have to wonder if the Holt signing will repeat the failed Joey Galloway experiment of last year. Lewis had plenty of good moments as a rotation tackle for the Panthers, showing that he can get into the backfield on occasion. But the Panthers, in a youth movement, let Lewis walk. Now he goes to New England, where the Pats need a backup who can bring the pass-rush skills that Jarvis Green used to bring. Lewis is a decent bet to fill that role well, and that makes him worth a low-cost shot for the Pats. King is another of the Australian Rules Football players trying to make the move into the NFL punting fraternity.

5 – Giants (added S Deon Grant, kept UFA P Jeff Feagles) – Grant has started every game for the last nine seasons for Seattle, Jacksonville, and Carolina, and his presence at free safety will help protect the Giants against Kenny Phillips’ major 2009 injury. With Grant and Antrel Rolle, the Giants now have a solid safety duo in a spot that was troublesome last year. Feagles returns for a 23rd season, and he remains one of the best directional kickers in the league. Feagles isn’t the boomer he once was, but he gets the job done.

5 (con’t) – Bengals (kept UFA OG Bobbie Williams) – Williams was perhaps the best guard on the market, but the Bengals were able to get a deal to keep him around. He’s been a starter for the last three years, and his physical blocking is one of the reasons the Bengals have strengthened their run game the last two years.

4 – Redskins (added UFA RB Willie Parker, UFA DT Howard Green, WR Roydell Williams, and RB Ryan Torain) – Parker becomes the latest import into the Redskins’ aged backfield, as the Redskins are paying him up to $3.1 million on a one-year deal. This is an uncapped-year special by Washington, which is giving Parker a chance to vie for carries against fellow vets Clinton Portis and Larry Johnson. Parker doesn’t have the speed he did in his Fast Willie days, but he probably still has more pop than Portis or Johnson does at this point. Perhaps a five- to eight-carry role will allow Parker to showcase what speed he has left. But our suspicion is that the Redskins just wasted a couple million dollars on a bet that won’t come in. Green is a sturdy 3-4 nose tackle who should probably be a backup but who can fit the role as the Redskins move to that defensive system. Williams once was a prospect for the Titans, but he hasn’t played an NFL game since 2007. Torain was a Shanahan favorite two seasons ago in Denver before injuries shortened his rookie campaign. It’s hard to see him getting a shot behind Parker, Portis, and Johnson, but Torain probably landed with the coach most likely to give him a fair shot.

4 (con’t) – Rams (added LB Na’il Diggs) – Diggs, part of the Panthers’ purge of experienced players this year, lands in St. Louis, where his former LB coach Ken Flajole is the defensive coordinator. Diggs can take over the veteran role Will Witherspoon had in St. Louis before being traded last year. Diggs is consistent, but he doesn’t make many plays from the outside linebacker spot.

4 (con’t) – Seahawks (added OG Ben Hamilton and WRs Mike Williams and Reggie Williams) – The Seahawks’ receiving corps is pretty sorry, and so Pete Carroll is taking a shot on a couple of reclamation projects. Mike Williams, who played for Carroll at USC, hasn’t panned out anywhere as a top-10 draft pick. Reggie Williams showed some flashes of ability in Jacksonville, most recently in 2008, but he sat out last year after repeated legal problems. Reggie is more likely than Mike to make the 2010 roster, but both of these guys look like longshots at this point. Hamilton started eight games for the Broncos last year, but as a holdover from Alex Gibbs’ days as the line guru in Denver, he no longer fit the Broncos. But Gibbs is now in Seattle, and Hamilton’s knowledge of and fit in the system makes him a natural to replace the traded Rob Sims at left guard, at least in the short term.

3 – Lions (kept DE Jared DeVries) – DeVries, who Detroit had released in the offseason, returns to the only team he has played for on a one-year, $1.7 million deal. He’s probably better off as a backup at this point in his career, but DeVries is a veteran who can still be an asset.

3 (con’t) – Jaguars (kept UFA DE Reggie Hayward) – Hayward returns for his sixth season in Jacksonville after coming off an injury that limited him to a single game in ’09. He’s little more than a rotation pass-rusher at this point, but he could provide depth behind youngsters Quentin Groves and Derrick Harvey and offseason acquisition Aaron Kampman.

2 – Cardinals (added UFA PK Jay Feely) – Feely, whom the Jets didn’t make a big push to retain, moves to Arizona, where he’ll replace Neil Rackers. Feely has been a reliable kicker in past years, and moving out of the Meadowlands into the Arizona dome at age 34 could help prolong his effectiveness.

2 (con’t) – Texans (added UFA Neil Rackers) – Rackers lost his gig to Feely in Arizona, and so he moves to Houston to compete with Kris Brown. Neither Rackers nor Brown was at his best last year, and the Texans’ prolific offense needs a consistent kicker to produce maximum points. If Rackers makes good and wins the job from Brown, he’ll earn $4.1 million over two years. But with only $350,000 guaranteed, Rackers will have to go out and take the job from Brown.

2 (con’t) – 49ers (added UFA OLB Travis LaBoy) – LaBoy missed the entire 2009 season with torn tendons in his foot, but before that injury he had 23.5 sacks in five years with the Cardinals and Titans. At age 28, he’s worth a one-year, $1.6 million risk to see if he can recapture his pass-rush skills.

2 (con’t) – Bears (kept UFA LB Pisa Tinoisamoa) – The linebacker we affectionately call The Tower missed most of his first Chicago season with injury, but he knows Lovie Smith’s defense well from St. Louis days and can be an effective fill-in starter.

2 (con’t) – Steelers (kept UFA DE Nick Eason) – Eason started five games last year, but he’s best as a fourth defensive end who can hold up in the 3-4 defense. He’s also one of the all-time good guys and the subject of one of the most telling stories I picked up covering Clemson football back in 2001. Just for personal reasons, I’m glad to see Eason stay in the league as long as possible.

1 – Browns (added C Eric Ghiaciuc) – Ghiaciuc started at center for the Bengals for several years, but he bounced around last year. Now he lands in Cleveland as Alex Mack’s backup.

1 (con’t) – Titans (added QB Chris Simms) – The Titans brought back Simms, who spent last year with Denver, to serve as the No. 3 quarterback behind Vince Young and Kerry Collins.

1 (con’t) – Raiders (added QB Kyle Boller) – Boller, who started a few games as the Rams’ backup last year, moves to Oakland to serve as the No. 3 quarterback behind JaMarcus Russell and Bruce Gradkowski. Gradkowski’s offseason pectoral muscle injury makes having Boller, a veteran who knows new offensive coordinator Hue Jackson, a nice insurance policy.

1 (con’t) – Panthers (added PK Todd Carter and S Aaron Francisco; claimed DB Brian Witherspoon on waivers) – Carter, a small-school kicker, comes in to serve as the kickoff guy in Carolina. The Panthers had Rhys Lloyd in that role last year, but finding a first-year player to fill that role saves them $800,000. And right now, every penny seems to count in Carolina. Francisco is a special-teams ace who has played on the last two Super Bowl losers. He won’t make much of a defensive impact, but he could help replace the departed Dante Wesley. Witherspoon brings some kick return skills.

1 Comment

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency

Crazy Kicker of the wild-card round

We didn’t plan on awarding the Crazy Kicker of the Week crown in the playoffs, but in the wild card round one kicker’s crazy day must be mentioned. Not only did Jay Feely serve his normal role as placekicker; he also had to fill in at punter after Steve Weatherford was sidelined by an irregular heartbeat. Feely got mad props for filling in – from this New York Times column to the bajillion camera shots NBC’s backup crew took of him – to the point that the response to Feely’s filling in was, well, crazy. Hence his award this week.

Crazy Kickers of the Week
Preseason Week 0/1 – P A.J. Trapasso, Titans
Preseason Week 2 – WR/PK Chad Ochocinco, Bengals
Week 1 – P/holder Hunter Smith, Redskins
Week 3 – P/holder Brian Moorman, Bills
Week 5 – P Steve Weatherford, Jets
Week 6 – P Jon Ryan, Seahawks
Week 8 – PK Josh Brown, Rams
Week 10 – P/holder Hunter Smith, Redskins
Week 13 – PK/onside kicker Rob Bironas, Titans
Week 15 – P/holder Hunter Smith, Redskins
Wild-card round – PK/P Jay Feely, Jets

1 Comment

Filed under Crazy Kicker of the Week

Jersey Numbers: Punters and Kickers

Over the next several weeks, we’re going to look at several different positions (I can’t yet promise all) to identify the best players wearing each jersey number at each position. If this goes as planned, we’ll then compile a list of the best player wearing each jersey number in the league.

If you have quibbles, or want to add someone I forgot, leave a comment and we’ll update this post. And please have patience – this is a big job.

We started this project with wide receivers in this post and then with tight ends in this post and quarterbacks in this post and running backs in this post and offensive linemen in this post. Now we move to kickers and punters, who wear numbers between 1 and 19, although the vast majority sport single numbers.

1 – PK Neil Rackers, Cardinals – Rackers hasn’t shown off the big leg he featured earlier in his career, but he has developed into a consistent threat on field goals. He gets the nod over Dallas’ Mat McBriar, a supersolid punter. Other notable 1s: Pat McAfee, Colts; Matt Turk, Texans

2 – P Dustin Colquitt, Chiefs – He doesn’t get much credit, but Colquitt may be the NFL’s best punter not named Shane Lechler. With 31 punts inside the 20 vs. just four touchbacks, and with an incredibly low average return rate of just 5.2 yards, it’s no wonder that Colquitt is second in the NFL in net punting with a 41.9-yard average. We give him the nod over good placekickers like David Akers of Philly, Mason Crosby of Green Bay, and Rob Bironas of Tennessee. Other notable 2s: Brandon Fields, Dolphins; Nick Harris, Lions; Reggie Hodges, Browns

3 – PK Stephen Gostkowski, Patriots – Gostkowski has developed into a solid clutch field goal kicker as well as a strong kickoff specialist. It’s rare to find a single kicker who does both jobs so well. Other notable 3s: Kris Brown, Texans; Josh Brown, Rams; John Carney, Saints; Jeff Reed, Steelers; Jay Feely, Jets; Matt Stover, Colts; Adam Podlesh, Jaguars; Hunter Smith, Redskins; Matt Bryant, Falcons

4 – P Andy Lee, 49ers – Lee is another underrated punter with terrific averages both gross and net. He gets the nod over long-time placekickers Jason Hanson of Detroit, John Kasay of Carolina, and Adam Vinatieri of Indianapolis, who has missed much of the season. Other notable 4s: Sam Koch, Ravens; Brad Maynard, Bears; Phil Dawson, Browns

5 – P Mike Scifres, Chargers – Scifres’ numbers don’t completely reflect it, but he can be a game-changing punter, as he showed in San Diego’s playoff win over Indianapolis last season. Other notable 5s: Dan Carpenter, Dolphins; Garrett Hartley, Saints; Rhys Lloyd, Panthers; Matt Prater, Broncos; Ben Graham, Cardinals; Donnie Jones, Rams; Chris Kluwe, Vikings

6 – PK Joe Nedney, 49ers – There aren’t dominant kickers or punters at this number, so we’ll give the nod to Nedney, who has long been a solid kicker with a big leg. The fact that he’s about the funniest kicker I ever interviewed doesn’t hurt either. Other notable 6s: Nick Folk, Cowboys; Ryan Succop, Chiefs; Shaun Suisham, Redskins; Chris Hanson, Patriots; Brett Kern, Titans; Thomas Morstead, Saints; Sav Rocca, Eagles

7 – P Jason Baker, Panthers – Few kickers wear this number, so Baker, who isn’t having his best season but has been solid in his time in Carolina, gets the nod. Other notable 7s: Jeremy Kapinos, Packers; Billy Cundiff, Ravens

8 – PK Ryan Longwell, Vikings – Longwell has long been one of the NFL’s most reliable kickers, and he’s 18-for-19 on field goals this year, including 2-of-2 from 50-plus. That gives him a slight nod over Buffalo P Brian Moorman. Other notable 8: Dirk Johnson, Buccaneers

9 – P Shane Lechler, Raiders – Lechler is on his way to a record-setting season. As Bill Simmons pointed out on Friday, Lechler has a chance to break the single-season record of 51.4 yards per punt (held by Hall of Fame QB Slingin’ Sammy Baugh). Lechler is currently averaging 51.7, and his net average of 44.7 yards is nearly three yards better than the single-season record, which Lechler already holds. He’s the best punter in the league and might be the best punter ever. Other notable 9s: Josh Bidwell, Buccaneers; Michael Koenen, Falcons; Jon Ryan, Seahawks; Daniel Sepulveda, Steelers; Steven Weatherford, Jets; Robbie Gould, Bears; Rian Lindell, Bills; Lawrence Tynes, Giants

10 – PK Nate Kaeding, Chargers – Kaeding has had his playoff problems, but he’s been a reliable regular-season producer. That gives him the nod over Seattle’s Olindo Mare, who is having a good season but has been inconsistent in recent years. Other notable 10s: Connor Barth, Buccaneers; Josh Scobee, Jaguars; Kevin Huber, Bengals

11 – PK Sebastian Janikowski, Raiders – The kicker also known as Sea Bass (think Dumb and Dumber) has a powerful leg and has the distinction of being one of the very few kickers to be a first-round pick in the NFL draft.

15 – P Craig Hentrich, Titans – Hentrich hasn’t played this season, but we’ll recognize his strong career as a punter in Green Bay and Tennessee here. Other notable 15: Dave Zastudil, Browns

17 – PK Shayne Graham, Bengals – Graham has developed into one of the most solid kickers around. Although his consistency this season has been lacking, Graham remains a good threat for Cincy. Other notable 17: Mitch Berger, Broncos

18 – P Jeff Feagles, Giants – Feagles has been punting in the NFL forever, but he still has a roster spot. He’s one of the few practicioners of the art of directional punting left in the league as well. Other notable 18: David Buehler, Cowboys

3 Comments

Filed under Jersey Numbers, Local Knowledge

FR: Clutch kickers

If you’re paying attention to Football Relativity, you know that we have a bit of an obsession with kickers. From our Crazy Kicker of the Week award to the songs of kickers that are constantly running through our head, we spend way too much time considering the status of these soccer-stylers. (I blame my days writing the kicker reports for Pro Football Weekly‘s fantasy football preview mag.) Since we’re thinking about them, we thought we’d use a Football Relativity comparison to assess the most clutch and least dependable placekickers in the league. The 10 level is for the kicker you’d want taking the game-winning kick in the Super bowl; the 1 level is for a kicker you wouldn’t trust to keep you out of overtime in the preseason.

10 – Adam Vinatieri, Colts – Vinatieri is the gold standard of clutch in the league, since he’s made not one but two Super Bowl-winning kicks. From the time he made a 45-yarder in the snow to advance the Patriots in the 2001 playoffs, he’s been almost automatic in the biggest moments. In fact, he didn’t miss a potential game-winning fourth-quarter kick between 1999 and 2007, an amazing string of clutchness. He’s still the best.

9 – Ryan Longwell, Vikings – Longwell has long been well above average as an NFL kicker. (I have long been well intentioned but susceptible to bad puns.) But he’s still at the top of his game, as he proved by kicking three game-winners and hitting all 6 of his attempts from 50-yards plus. The career 82 percent kicker is still one of the best.

9 (con’t) – Robbie Gould, Bears – Gould’s most famous kick was a 49-yarder in overtime that won a playoff game against the Seahawks three seasons ago. That’s an impressive achievement in the wintry, windy conditions of Soldier Field. He has an 86 percent success rate in his four-year career, which speaks even more about his ability. The fact that Gould made the one big money kick he’s tried so far indicates that his clutch ability is pretty strong.

9 (con’t) – Josh Brown, Rams – Brown was incredibly clutch when he was in Seattle, making two famous game-winners from 50-yards-plus. He’s still as clutch as he ever was – his 49-yard game-winner against Washington last year proves it – but he doesn’t have as many clutch chances as he once did. But kicking indoors will allow Brown to keep his range, and his 19-of-30 success rate on 50-plus yarders shows that Brown is an elite kicker in the league.

9 (con’t) – Shayne Graham, Bengals – Graham bounced around the league before finding a home with Cincinnati in 2003, but since then he has been one of the most accurate kickers in the league. He’s made 87.5 percent of his tries as a Bengal, which is a remarkable rate of consistency. He has three career game-winners and is 7-for-14 from 50-yards plus. And he’s done this in a city where the winter weather creates adverse kicking conditions. If Graham played on a better team, more of us would know how clutch he is, but the one-time Pro Bowler and current Bengals franchise player is among the very best in the league.

8 – Jeff Reed, Steelers – Reed hit the first game-winner of the 2009 season in overtime against the Titans, and he has proven to be a solid kicker in his eight years in Pittsburgh. He’s hit nearly 83 percent of his career field goals and has one playoff game-winner as well. He doesn’t have a howitzer for a leg, but in maybe the NFL’s toughest stadium to kick in, Reed continually makes the big ones.

8 (con’t) – Jason Hanson, Lions – Hanson has spent his entire 18-year career with the Lions, and as such he’s been a forgotten kicker in recent years. But he’s an 82 percent career kicker who still has a big leg, as he proved by making 8-of-8 tries from 50-plus-yards last year. Hanson hasn’t had a lot of pressure kicks recently, but his performance elsewhere shows that he still has the chops to make those big kicks.

8 (con’t) – Jason Elam, Falcons – Elam has long had one of the league’s biggest legs, as he proved by tying the NFL record with a 63-yarder in 1998, and he had a streak of 30 straight field goals into last season. Elam got off to a rough start this season, but his career 81 percent average and 60-plus percent rate from 50-yards-plus shows that he’s still a great security blanket in the clutch.

8 (con’t) – John Carney, Saints – Carney is 45 years old, but he’s still a quality kicker, as his Pro Bowl campaign last year showed. The fact that he’s connected on 83 percent of his kicks in his now 20-year career shows his reliability. He no longer has eye-popping range, but if you have a pressure 40-yarder, there are few kickers you would want more than Carney.

8 (con’t) – Rob Bironas, Titans – In his five years in Tennessee, Bironas has hit 83 percent of his field goal tries, and he’s also shown late-game chops. He famously had four game-winning kicks in 2005, including a 60-yarder to beat the Colts. He also had eight field goals in a single game against the Texans. Bironas is one of the best young kickers in the league.

7 – Nick Folk, Cowboys – Folk, a third-year kicker, has been extremely consistent for the Cowboys. Last year he hit on 20-of-22 field goal tries, and for his career he’s over 87 percent on kicks. He’s also 5-for-8 career on tries of 50 yards or longer. He’s also made some long game-winning or game-tying kicks, including a 52-yarder that forced overtime against Arizona last year and a 53-yarder to beat Buffalo in a 2007 Monday-night game.

7 (con’t) – Stephen Gostkowski, Patriots – Gostkowski faced the unenviable task of replacing Adam Vinatieri in New England, but he has performed well, going to the Pro Bowl last season. He’s connected on about 85 percent of his career field goals and has a strong leg both on kickoffs and on field goals, and his playoff performance has been solid as well. Gostkowski hasn’t had the moments Vinatieri had so far, but his performance indicates that he’s ready to handle them.

6 – Joe Nedney, 49ers – Of all the kickers I’ve ever interviewed, Nedney was one of my favorites. He’s a huge guy – 6-foot-5 – who has always had leg strength but who took a while to gain consistency. But he has made 88 percent of his field goals since coming to San Fran in ’05, which goes to show that he’s become a dependable guy.

6 (con’t) – Lawrence Tynes, Giants – Tynes is an 80 percent career kicker, and he also made a big-time 47-yard kick in overtime against Green Bay in the NFC championship to put the Giants into the Super Bowl, even though he had missed two shorter field goals earlier in the game. He doesn’t have a huge leg – he hasn’t made a 50-yard-plus field goal since 2006 in Kansas City – and the fact that the Giants chose John Carney over Tynes throughout the 2008 season is a red flag too. But Tynes has established himself as a trustworthy option.

6 (con’t) – John Kasay, Panthers – Kasay has been with Carolina since the franchise took the field in 1995, and by and large he has been a consistent force. He’s shown the ability to make long field goals in the clutch, but he famously failed in a couple of big spots in the Panthers’ lone Super Bowl appearance. He has 12 game-winners in his career, and even approaching age 40 he’s still a good if not great clutch option.

5 – David Akers, Eagles – Akers hit 19 straight postseason field goals before finally missing one in last year’s NFC championship game, which goes to show that he’s ultra-dependable in big spots. He’s a career 80 percent kicker, but last year was his first season in four where he surpassed the 80 percent mark for the year. Akers has a good pedigree, but his numbers are starting to leak, which makes that miss vs. the Cardinals last year loom a little larger. Still, most teams would be happy to ride on Akers’ leg.

5 (con’t) – Phil Dawson, Browns – Dawson is in his 11th season as the Browns’ kicker, and he’s made nearly 83 percent of his kicks in weather that can often be the opposite of kicker-friendly. He also has 11 game-winning kicks in that time. He’s a solid 10-of-15 on tries of 50-yards-plus, which shows he can make those kicks but doesn’t often take them. He’s provided a good comfort level for the Browns over the years.

5 (con’t)- Kris Brown, Texans – Brown, who started his career with the Steelers, has been in Houston since the Texans were born, has 11 career game-winning field goals, including eight with Houston. One of those was a 57-yarder to beat the Dolphins in 2007. His career percentage is just under 80 percent, but he has made 55 percent of his 50-yard-plus attempts. Brown has the chops to make a long field goal in the clutch, but he’s not the sure-fire three-point producer that some other kickers are.

4 – Neil Rackers, Cardinals – Rackers’ career percentage of 77.4 percent isn’t great, but he has a strong leg (19 career 50-plus field goals), and he has one Pro Bowl season in ’05. He made an NFL record 40 field goals that year. In recent years, he’s been a very solid option for the Cards, but he’s never been the ultraconsistent option other kickers are.

4 (con’t) – Mason Crosby, Packers – In his three years in Green Bay, Crosby has shown a big leg that is a little wild at times. He’s completed just under 79 percent of his kicks, which is a percentage lower than most teams would prefer. He does have the ability to hit from deep, making 7-of-12 from 50-yards-plus. He’s a great touchback guy and a long-range threat, but for a clutch 42-yarder there are better options in the league.

4 (con’t) – Dan Carpenter, Dolphins – In his first season last year, Carpenter hit 21-of-25 field goals, including a last-minute game winner vs. Oakland and one 50-yarder. His only misses were from 40 yards and further, which means he was automatic on short-to-midrange tries. His career is off to a good start, but we have a long way to go before we can truly call him clutch. But like Vinatieri, Carpenter was an undrafted free agent found by Bill Parcells, so at least the pedigree is there.

3 – Josh Scobee, Jaguars – Scobee is in his sixth year in Jacksonville, but his success rate on field goals is less than 80 percent, which is not ideal. He did make four 50-yarders last year, which along with his touchback percentage shows his value, and he made back-to-back game-winners early last season. Scobee is the ultimate good but not great NFL kicker who you think can make the big one but who will always leave a shadow of doubt.

3 (con’t) – Sebastian Janikowski, Raiders – The former first-round pick (you read that right) has always had one of the league’s biggest legs, as he showed by making a 57-yard game-winner last year vs. the Jets. But his consistency level has been spotty, as shown by his 77 percent career success rate. Sea-Bass is a great option for long clutch kicks of 55 yards or more, but at more reasonable distances there are many other guys you’d rather have.

3 (con’t) – Jay Feely, Jets – Feely has bounced around a little, but his career accuracy rate is 81.5 percent, and he has five career game-winners. He doesn’t have a big leg, which shows in his scattershot rate on field goals of 40 yards or more (65 percent). So Feely is a dependable guy on the short field goals but not the guy you want taking a long attempt in the clutch.

3 (con’t) – Mike Nugent, Buccaneers – Nugent has three career game-winners, but his career percentage of 79.8 is only average among NFL kickers. Now that he’s in Tampa Bay where the environment is more kicker-friendly, he could up his percentage. But he needs to take advantage of his strong leg by making more of his long attempts before he can be considered a real clutch threat.

3 (con’t) – Olindo Mare, Seahawks – Mare landed in Seattle last year and beat out Brandon Coutu in the race to replace Josh Brown. Mare had a solid season, making 24-of-27 field goals including a game-winner against the Rams. But last year was only the second time since 2002 that Mare made more than 78 percent of his field-goal tries. He has a strong leg for kickoffs but has been scattershot on his longer attempts, making just 18-0f-39 from 50-yards-plus in his career. Mare deserves credit for holding off Coutu two years in a row, but he’s no longer an elite clutch kicker in the NFL.

2 – Nate Kaeding, Chargers – Kaeding has a big leg and great regular-season results (86 percent success rate), but his playoff results are lacking. He missed game-tying tries that eliminated the Chargers in the ’04 and ’05 seasons, and missed in four straight postseason games. So despite the fact that his stats look good, Kaeding isn’t the guy you want taking a clutch kick.

2 (con’t) – Rian Lindell, Bills – Lindell has made his chops as a bad-weather kicker in Buffalo, and he has made 80 percent of his career field-goal tries along with every extra-point he has ever tried. But Lindell’s clutch performance has been less than ideal, which means that there are better options out there.

1 – Matt Prater, Broncos – Since replacing Jason Elam in Denver last year, Prater has showed a big leg with good range, but his consistency is lacking (only 70 percent success rate). He has hit 6-of-7 from 50-plus, which helps, but he’s still someone who needs to prove his clutch chops.

1 (con’t) – Shaun Suisham, Redskins – Suisham struggled last season after performing consistently in his first two years in Washington. His career percentage is just 78 percent, and he missed a 30-yarder in his long playoff game. Suisham could still grow into a consistent kicker, but that consistency has been lacking so far.

1 (con’t) – Steven Hauschka, Ravens – Hauschka replaces long-time Ravens kicker Matt Stover this year because he’s got a longer leg both on kickoffs and field goals. The former N.C. State kicker had two long attempts last year as the kickoff specialist, hitting from 54 and missing from 52, and he’s 1-of-2 thus far this season. But he has a long way to go before he provides a comfort level.

1 (con’t) – Ryan Succop, Chiefs – Succop, who was Mr. Irrelevant in the NFL draft this year, made his first career field goal, a 53-yarder against Baltimore. It remains to be seen how clutch Succop will be, but he is one of the most intriguing to watch because his kicking leg is about three times as muscular as his plant leg. Believe me – it’s hard to stop staring at the difference.

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

FR: Free agency weekly review

Here are some thoughts on this week’s free-agent moves. (You can read about the opening weekend moves relative to each other here.) Once the market slows down and the draft approaches, we’ll put everything together in a massive offseason moves relativity post that compares the entire movement of the market team-by-team. (And if this post is 2000-plus words, then that post really will be massive.)

The following moves are compared relative to each other, with 10 as the most significant and 1 as mere drops in the bucket. Only the moves listed below are considered in this particular ranking.

10 – Cardinals (kept QB Kurt Warner and P Ben Graham; added FS Keith Lewis) – After some tense and contentious moments, the Cardinals were able to come to terms on a two-year deal with Warner (with $19 million of the $23 million guaranteed). The Cardinals simply had to get this deal done to have any shot of maintaining their momentum from their Super Bowl appearance, especially considering all of the coaching-staff changes they’ve had. Warner is a tone-setter in the locker room and still a very good player to boot. Now he has the chance to conclude his career in an ideal situation for his talents.

9 – Ravens (kept LB Ray Lewis; added C Matt Birk) – After losing Bart Scott, the Ravens needed to keep Lewis to maintain continuity on their defense. The fact that Lewis gets to retire as the greatest Raven ever is icing on the cake. Lewis had a great season last year after struggling for a couple of campaigns. He doesn’t have to be at the all-time-great level anymore, but the Ravens still need him to play at a high level to help the other defensive stars (Terrell Suggs, Ed Reed, and Haloti Ngata) do what they do best. Birk replaces Jason Brown. Brown is younger and more physical, but Birk is a solid pro who will do his job effectively.

8 – Seahawks (added WR T.J. Houshmandzadeh and TE John Owens) – Houshmandzadeh, who got $40 million total and $15 million guaranteed in a five-year contract, was the best wide receiver to become a free agent. He’s been productive despite being across from the more highly touted Chad Johnson/Ocho Cinco. Even with below-mediocre quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick playing most of last year, Houshmandzadeh still posted decent numbers. Now he moves to Seattle, where he and Deion Branch will try to reinvigorate an offense that sputtered last year. Neither is a great deep threat, but the West Coast scheme that the Seahawks continue to run doesn’t really require that. We’ll discover if Houshmandzadeh is a true No. 1 as this move plays out; I tend to believe that he’s not quite at that dominant level but will still be very good. Owens is a block-first tight end who will help in short-yardage situations.

7 – Eagles (added S Sean Jones) – After losing Brian Dawkins (as well as Sean Considine), the Eagles needed some safety help, and they got an impact player in Jones. Jones has 14 interceptions since 2006 and is thought of in some circles as a borderline Pro Bowl player. The deal is only for one year, so it’s a make good for Jones, which should encourage strong performance even more. If Jones reaches his potential and gels in the Philly defense, he’ll be a standout, and this deal will go down as one of the underrated steals of this year’s free agent market.

6 – Titans (added WR Nate Washington and DT Jovan Haye; kept P Craig Hentrich) – These two moves are designed to replace losses (WR Brandon Jones and DT Albert Haynesworth). Washington may be better than Jones. He can get deep consistently, but the question is whether he is consistent enough to be a top receiver. The Titans need him to be at least a 60-catch guy, and that might be asking too much. But of all the receivers on the open market, Washington (6 years, $27M)  is the best bet to take a step up. Haye (4 years, $16M) isn’t anywhere close to Haynesworth, but he will fit comfortably into the Titans’ DT rotation. Tennessee will need several players to step up to replace Haynesworth, and Haye can be part of that – but only part. It’ll be interesting to see if the Titans can retain their scary factor on defense without their best player from ’08.

6 (con’t) – Buccaneers (added RB Derrick Ward, LB Niko Koutouvides, and PK Mike Nugent; kept safeties Will Allen and Jermaine Phillips, TE Jerramy Stevens, and WR Cortez Hankton) – This offseason, the Bucs have added TE Kellen Winslow and re-signed WRs Antonio Bryant and Michael Clayton. Now they add Ward, a solid running back who had his best success in a rotation with the Giants. Ward, who gets a 4-year deal worth $17 million, moves from partnering with Brandon Jacobs and Ahmad Bradshaw to teaming with Earnest Graham and Cadillac Williams. Those are 3 talented backs, so the question will be finding the right way to divide carries. It’s clear from the moves so far that the Bucs are trying to upgrade their offensive skill positions, which were never eye-popping under Jon Gruden despite Gruden’s play-calling prowess. Meanwhile, Nugent could replace Matt Bryant as the Bucs’ placekicker. Allen and Phillips should be starters at safety – Phillips was sought after elsewhere but opted to stay. Stevens is a curious retention given Winslow’s arrival, but Stevens is a talented pass catcher as well.

5 – Bengals (added WR Laveranues Coles and QB J.T. O’Sullivan; kept RB Cedric Benson and OLB Darryl Blackstock) – Coles worked his way out of New York even though the Jets owed him $6 million guaranteed, and the gambit worked. He moves to Cincinnati to replace T.J. Houshmandzadeh (and perhaps even WR Chad Johnson/Ocho Cinco) as a primary target. Coles isn’t as big as Houshmandzadeh, but he has a little more speed, and he’s still a legitimate starting receiver. This is a pretty good fallback option for the Bengals. On the retention side, Benson isn’t great, but he was better than the other options Cincinnati had last year. If he starts and produces a 1,000-yard season, which isn’t asking a ton, this deal (2 years, $7 million) is probably at a fair market price. And if Benson can like up to his talent, this deal has a chance of being a steal. (A small chance, admittedly, but still worth noting.)

4 – Dolphins (added C Jake Grove) – The Dolphins have spent big to keep their own good players, but Grove (5 years, $30 million) is one of the first big outside additions. Grove, who was in Oakland, will replace Samson Satele and try to help control the massive 3-4 nose tackles like Vince Wilfork, Kris Jenkins, and Marcus Stroud in the AFC East.

3 – Broncos (added RB Lamont Jordan, QB Chris Simms, and DT Ronald Fields; kept DE Kenny Peterson) – More moves from the Broncos as they add seemingly every other mid-level free agent on the market. Jordan is the third running back Denver has signed this offseason. He’s most likely to take on a short-yardage role, with Correll Buckhalter carrying the load regularly and J.J. Arrington serving as a third-down receiver out of the backfield as well as a returner. Fields got a minor deal (2 years, $5 million), but he should start at defensive tackle. He’s a solid part of a 4-man DT rotation. Simms is at least a quality backup, and if the Jay Cutler situation ultimately blows up, Simms is a decent fallback option as a starter. His addition means the Cutler situation still bears watching.

3 (con’t) – Saints (added CB Jabari Greer and FB Heath Evans; kept WR Devery Henderson) – The Saints are constantly looking for secondary help, and Greer should provide at least some. But Greer is not a No. 1 cornerback, and if the Saints put him in that role, he could suffer a similar collapse to what Jason David endured in the Big Easy. Despite that risk, though, this is a move the Saints had to make, and Greer was the best of what was left on the market at corner. Henderson is a speedy wide receiver who isn’t consistent enough to be a starter but is dangerous in short bursts. With Marques Colston and Lance Moore on hand, the Saints don’t need to rely on Henderson consistently. That allows them to put him in the best possible positions for his talents. he’s a highly paid No. 3 receiver now, but he fits the Saints’ roster and scheme well. Evans replaces Mike Karney as a blocking fullback and is an upgrade because he’s better with the ball in his hands.

2 – Jets (added S Jim Leonhard; kept PK Jay Feely) – Feely beat out Mike Nugent last year, and so the Jets kept him and let the former second-round pick leave as a free agent. Feely has bounced around a bit, but he’s a quality kicker.) – After taking LB Bart Scott from the Ravens, the Jets raided Baltimore again to get Leonhard. While Leonhard isn’t the most physically gifted player, he’s always fought his way into the lineup and been productive. When Dawan Landry went down last year, Leonhard played really well. He’s a heady player who will help new head coach Rex Ryan install his defense. With Kerry Rhodes in place, Leonhard doesn’t have to be the play-making safety, but Leonhard’s dependability will allow Rhodes more freedom to do what he does best. This is a solid addition for the Jets. Meanwhile, Feely beat out Mike Nugent last year, and so the Jets kept him and let the former second-round pick leave as a free agent. Feely has bounced around a bit, but he’s a quality kicker.

2 (con’t) – Bills (added CB Drayton Florence; kept OT Kirk Chambers) – Florence busted out after signing a big contract in Jacksonville last season, but his new deal with Buffalo (2 years, $6.6 million) befits his talents much better. With Jabari Greer likely leaving, the Bills had to add cornerback help, but they have ’08 first-rounder Leodis McKelvin and Terrence McGee in primary roles there. Florence is paid like a nickelback, and he can probably fill that role sufficiently.

2 (con’t) – Lions (added DT Grady Jackson and CB Philip Buchanon; kept OG Damion Cook) – Jackson is a run-stuffer personified at 375 pounds (or more, depending on the year). He’s a two-down player at most, but when he’s in the game the middle is completely clogged up. It’s hard to say whether he’ll play all three years on his new $8 million contract, but if he stays in somewhat reasonable shape, he’s an asset to any roster. Buchanon busted out as a first-round pick in Oakland but resuscitated his career in Tampa. He’s not a shut-down corner, but as a starter he’s a little above average.

2 (con’t) – Patriots (added CB Shawn Springs; kept OL Russ Hochstein, P Chris Hanson, and LB Eric Alexander) – Springs was cut in Washington after an injury-plagued year, but he’s still a useful guy. He might end up at safety instead of cornerback, but the Patriots more than most teams seem willing to use a veteran who may have lost a step on the outside. This, like the addition of RB Fred Taylor, just feels like a natural Patriots type of move.

2 (con’t) – Browns (added TE Robert Royal; kept S Mike Adams) – After trading Kellen Winslow, the Browns needed tight end help. Royal (who got a 4-year, $10 million contract)  is starting caliber, so he’s a good worst-case scenario for the Browns. They also have Steve Heiden, like Royal a solid NFL starter at the position. But my guess is that Cleveland wants second-year TE Martin Rucker to emerge as the pass-catching threat at the position. If he develops, Rucker could end up replacing a lot of what Winslow contributed in the passing game. Adams chose to stay in Cleveland instead of moving to Green Bay. With fellow safety Sean Jones still sans contract, it was important for the Browns to keep Adams for continuity’s sake.

2 (con’t) – Vikings (kept LB Heath Farwell) – Several teams wanted Farwell, a solid linebacker and special-teams contributor, but the Vikings were able to fight them off and keep him.

1 – Falcons (kept DE Chauncey Davis) – Davis isn’t a starter, but he’s an important player because Atlanta knows that sackmeister John Abraham is better in shorter bursts. Davis can rotate with Abraham and plays well when he’s in there. So while a 4-year, $14 million deal with $8 million guaranteed looks too rich, it makes some sense.

1 (con’t) – Raiders (kept OL Cooper Carlisle and TE Tony Stewart) – Carlisle is important to Oakland because of his versatility. He can start effectively but can also move inside if necessary.

1 (con’t) – Giants (added S C.C. Brown) – Brown is the fourth veteran the Giants have brought in to supplement their defense. He’ll help to take over for James Butler, who left via free agency. Brown isn’t special, but he’s solid, which is all the Giants need given their other playmakers defensively.

1 (con’t) – Texans (kept WR David Anderson) – Anderson had signed a contract tender with Denver, but the Texans chose to match it and keep the former seventh-round pick. Anderson emerged as a No. 3 receiver last year behind Andre Johnson and Kevin Walter, and he’s the perfect size to make plays out of the slot position.

1 (con’t) – 49ers (added DE Demetric Evans and QB Damon Huard) – Evans got a decent deal (2 years, $8.5 million) to come from Washington and serve as a starter. Huard is a professional backup who can help to mentor Shaun Hill and Alex Smith as they compete for the starting quarterback job.

1 (con’t) Chiefs – (kept S Jon McGraw; added LB Darrell Robertson) – McGraw is a backup safety and special-teams player who is used to the Patriot way because he played for the Jets and former Pats aide Eric Mangini. Robertson was cut by New England Thursday and immediately snapped up by the Chiefs, who are fast becoming New England Midwest.

2 Comments

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency