Tag Archives: j.p. foschi

FR: Preseason additions

What additions teams made late in the preseason will make the most difference come the regular season? We try to figure that out in this post, which comments on additions made from the second preseason game until the season opener. For thoughts on earlier additions, check out this training-camp additions post and work your way back.

Giants (add OG Shawn Andrews) – Andrews, who made two Pro Bowls and thrived at guard for the Eagles, lost his job there after playing only two games over the past two years. Last season, the problem was a back injury, while a battle with depression cost Andrews the entire 2008 season. The Eagles said he failed a physical when they cut him in March. If he gets in shape and stays healthy, Andrews can still be an above-average guard who can help address injury issues the Giants are facing with Chris Snee and Rich Seubert. And you’d assume that Andrews would be motivated to play the Eagles twice this season. Maybe this is a gamble that doesn’t pay off, but it makes sense for the Giants to take a low-cost shot on a player who thrived before.

Vikings (add WR Javon Walker) – Walker, who last played in the NFL in 2008, comes to Minnestota to help a receiving corps that faces health issues for Sidney Rice and Percy Harvin (along with Jaymar Johnson). Walker was highly productive in Green Bay and Denver, but he was a high-dollar bust in Oakland, and he hasn’t been healthy in years. Plus, he and Brett Favre are far from chums, after Favre threw Walker under the bus during  a holdout when both were Packers. If Walker still has something left, he could be a find for the Vikings, but adding him at this point – especially after he had such public disputes with Favre – seems like a strange (if not a desperate) move.

Texans (add RB Derrick Ward) – Ward, who was cut by Tampa Bay after being a high-dollar free-agent bust in 2009, landed in Houston as a complimentary back to Arian Foster. Ward is a bigger back who brings a little of the thump that Houston was depending on rookie Ben Tate to provide before Tate’s training-camp injury. It’s a nice landing spot for Ward, who turns 30 this season but is just two years removed from a thousand-yard season.

Saints (kept DT Kendrick Clancy; add RB DeShawn Wynn) – Clancy, who played just two games for New Orleans last year after starting 14 for the team the year before, returns as a run-stuffing specialist. He is still good enough to clog the middle for 10-15 plays a game. And after adding Ladell Betts looking for a No. 3 running back, the Saints are also giving ex-Packer Wynn a shot. Wynn had a few moments in Green Bay, but he’s not a dynamic threat. Wynn ended up beating out Betts for a roster spot.

Chargers (claim CB Fred Bennett) – Bennett, a former fourth-round pick, emerged as a prospect in Houston early on, but his performance slipped over the last couple of years. Still, he’s worth a waiver claim for the Chargers, who gave up Antonio Cromartie in the offseason, which limited their CB depth.

Bills (add TE J.P. Foschi) – Foschi came to Buffalo in late August to address a major tight end depth problem, and with Shawn Nelson facing suspension and Derek Schoumann hurt, Foschi could make the opening-day roster. Foschi is a decent tight end who won’t embarrass the Bills, but he’s not going to change the team’s fate.

Lions (add LB Rocky Boiman) – With standout sophomore DeAndre Levy fighting a groin injury, the Lions added Boiman for insurance at middle linebacker. The eight-year vet has proven to be a solid if unspectacular factor in the middle for Pittsburgh, Indy, K.C., and Tennessee.

Seahawks (add WR Brandon Jones) – Jones was recently released by the 49ers, but he drew significant interest and landed in Seattle. He faces an uphill battle for playing time with the Seahawks, given the presence of veterans Deion Branch and T.J. Houshmandzadeh, youngsters Golden Tate and Deon Butler, and the shocking resurgence of former first-round bust Mike Williams. But perhaps the Seahawks want to pick Jones’ brain leading up to their regular-season opener against the 49ers.

Jets (add OLB Ricky Foley) – After Calvin Pace suffered a foot injury that will sideline him into the regular season, the Jets claimed Foley, a former sack-producer in the CFL who couldn’t win a job in Seattle. The Jets’ 3-4 defense should be a better fit for Foley than Pete Carroll’s 4-3, and if nothing else Foley adds depth at a cheap price while Pace is out.

Bears (add QB Todd Collins) – Collins, who started almost a full season for the Bills way back in 1997, has been a solid backup in Kansas City and Washington over the last decade. Now he goes to Chicago, where he has knocked off Matt Gutierrez and should soon surpass rookie Dan LeFevour to become Jay Cutler’s backup. It’s a worthwhile investment for a Bears team that needs good QB play to keep its offense potent.

Redskins (add FB Carey Davis and S Tyrone Carter) – Davis, who spent the last four seasons with the Steelers, landed with the Redskins to help fill-in for injured FB Mike Sellers. Carter is another former Steeler who will hit despite his smaller size.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency

Jersey Numbers: Tight Ends

Over the next several weeks, we’re going to look at several different positions (I can’t yet promise all) to identify the best players wearing each jersey number at each position. If this goes as planned, we’ll then compile a list of the best player wearing each jersey number in the league.

If you have quibbles, or want to add someone I forgot, leave a comment and we’ll update this post. And please have patience – this is a big job.

We started this project with wide receivers in this post. Now we move to tight ends. In general, tight ends wear numbers between 80 and 89, but several also wear numbers in the 40s.

40 – Jim Kleinsasser, Vikings – It’s hard to tell whether Kleinsasser is a true tight end or more of a fullback/H-back, but he plays on the line enough to earn the nod here. Kleinsasser doesn’t get the ball much, but he remains a solid blocker deep into a solid career.

41 – Spencer Havner, Packers – OK, so Havner is the only tight end wearing 41. But we have to give a few props to a player who was playing linebacker until about three or four weeks ago and now suddenly has three touchdowns in the past two games.

44 – Dallas Clark, Colts – Clark is probably the best receiving tight end in the league at the moment. He’s not just reliable – he’s explosive down the middle of the field. He’s emerged as the complement to Reggie Wayne in the Colts’ prolific passing game, and Clark is just now hitting his prime.

45 – Leonard Pope, Chiefs – The former Cardinals starter landed in K.C. this year with a new jersey number. Pope has never played up to his immense physical gifts, but he is still a threat simply because of his size and speed.

46 – Daniel Fells, Rams – Fells is the only tight end wearing 46, but like Havner he has three touchdowns on the season. Of course, one came on a fake field goal, and the other two came from Kyle Boller in one game on the same play call, but three is three. Other notable 46: Delanie Walker, 49ers

47 – Chris Cooley, Redskins – Cooley is hurt at the moment, but he has proven to be a terrific pass catcher in Washington in recent years despite playing with subpar quarterbacks throughout his tenure. He’s also a serviceable blocker and a fan favorite because of his outsized personality. He’s one of the few home-grown players who has really paid off for the Redskins. Other notable 47s: Jeff King, Panthers, Billy Bajema, Rams; Travis Beckum, Giants; Gijon Robinson, Colts

80 – Bo Scaife, Titans – Scaife is the Titans’ most important receiver because he has great size and provides a great interior target. Tennessee recognized his value when it tagged Scaife as its franchise player this past offseason. That’s enough reason to give Scaife the nod at 80 over Zach Miller of the Raiders, who’s a great young receiver. Other notable 80: Derek Schouman, Bills

81 – Owen Daniels, Texans – Before he suffered a season-ending knee injury last week, Daniels was the most productive tight end in the league. That marked the third straight season he was one of the league’s most dangerous targets. That’s enough to earn him honors for this number over Minnesota’s Visanthe Shiancoe, who has blossomed as a receiving threat the last two seasons. Other notable 81s: Dustin Keller, Jets; Joey Haynos, Dolphins

82 – Jason Witten, Cowboys – Witten isn’t having his most sterling of seasons, but he has long been one of the league’s two or three elite receiving threats from the tight end position. He may be the receiver Cowboys opponents need to concentrate on stopping most. He’s an All-Pro level tight end, which puts him above young studs Kellen Winslow of the Buccaneers and Greg Olsen of the Bears at this number. Other notable 82s: Alex Smith, Eagles; L.J. Smith, Ravens

83 – Heath Miller, Steelers – Miller is a tall target who can really catch the ball, and that makes him a great mid-field target in a Pittsburgh offense where ball control is still important. Miller is also having a bit of a bounce-back year numbers-wise, which makes it even easier to give him the nod at 83 over the declining Alge Crumpler of Tennessee. Other notable 83: Jeff Dugan, Vikings

84 – Benjamin Watson, Patriots – The Patriots have never seemed completely satisfied with Watson, a former first-round pick, at tight end, but Watson continues to put up good touchdown numbers. He also has the longest touchdown reception in Patriots playoff history, a 63-yarder against Jacksonville in the 2005 season. So he gets the nod over Randy McMichael of the Rams, who has had some decent seasons, and rookie first-rounder Brandon Pettigrew of the Lions. Other notable 84: Robert Royal, Browns

85 – Antonio Gates, Chargers – Gates, who didn’t play football but basketball in college, has been one of the preeminent receiving tight ends in the league over the past decade or so. Injuries have slowed him a step or two, but he’s still really good. One day, Vernon Davis of the 49ers will claim this number, but that won’t happen until Gates retires. Other notable 85: David Thomas, Saints

86 – Todd Heap, Ravens – Heap is another tight end having a renaissance year this season, reminding all of us how good of a receiver he has been in his career. Like Heath Miller, his size is his biggest asset as a receiver. Other notable 86s: Donald Lee, Packers; Fred Davis, Redskins; Daniel Coats, Bengals; Chris Baker, Patriots

87 – Brent Celek, Eagles – Celek had a good game or two before this season, but he has seized his opportunity this season and established himself as a better-than-average receiver at tight end already. He brings an explosiveness to the position that the Eagles never got from L.J. Smith. Other notable 87: Kellen Davis, Bears

88 – Tony Gonzalez, Falcons – T-Gon is another of the classic tight ends of this era, and like Gates he had a basketball background. Gonzalez is still a prolific receiver, and his veteran presence has made the Falcons’ offense much more dangerous. He’s clearly the choice here over Jeremy Shockey of New Orleans and many others. Other notable 88s: JerMichael Finley, Packers; Tony Scheffler, Broncos; Dante Rosario, Panthers; J.P. Foschi, Bengals; Desmond Clark, Bears

89 – Daniel Graham, Broncos– This is a close call between Graham, who’s known more for his blocking than for his receiving, and young tight ends like Kevin Boss of the Giants, John Carlson of Seattle, and Marcedes Lewis of the Jaguars. We’ll give Graham the nod based on the longevity of his career and his blocking prowess. Other notable 89s: Will Heller, Lions; Sean Ryan, Chiefs; Matt Spaeth, Steelers; Ben Patrick, Cardinals; Shawn Nelson, Bills

6 Comments

Filed under Football Relativity, Jersey Numbers

Training Camp Moves – Week 4

This post is a compilation of additions NFL teams made during the fourth full week of camps. The timetable for this post opens on August 15 and continues through August 21. You can read a summary of the first week of training camp moves here and the second week moves here and the third week moves here. Because moves will be coming fast and furious throughout training camp, we’re going to use quick analysis of moves each week during this time instead of creating a massive Football Relativity comparison.

Additions

Vikings (add QB Brett Favre) – All the Favre thoughts and links that you could possibly want can be found from in this post.

Saints (add PK John Carney) – With Garrett Hartley getting suspended for four games to open the season, the Saints needed a fill-in. So they brought back Carney, a former Saint who was a fill-in for the injured Lawrence Tynes for the Giants last season and ended up having a stud season and making the Pro Bowl. Carney is in his mid-40s, but if he can deliver like he did last year, he’ll be an upgrade for the Saints.

Raiders (add CB Ricky Manning, LB Morlon Greenwood and S Rashad Baker) – Manning is small but has been an effective nickelback in the past. His Chicago tenure wasn’t good, but he’s still worth a look in the slot to see if he has the skills to play. Greenwood is a veteran ‘backer who has started through most of his eight-year career in Miami and Houston. He should upgrade the Raiders’ depth and has a good shot to become a starter on the strong side. Baker played 10 games and had three picks for the Raiders last year, and then signed with the Eagles in the offseason. When Philly cut him in camp, the Raiders quickly brought Baker back.

49ers (add CB Eric Green) – Green, who was with the Cardinals in their Super Bowl season, signed a two-year, $6 million deal with Miami, but it became apparent in training camp that he wasn’t going to play for the Dolphins. So he was cut, then quickly picked up by the Niners, who are still trying to fill the spot left by Walt Harris’ season-ending injury in minicamp. Green has good size but not good speed or cover skills. Still, though, he’s better than most of what’s out on the market at this point, so he’s worth a look for San Fran.

Broncos (add DE LeKevin Smith) – Smith had played 28 games over the past two years in New England, but he was a bottom-of-the-rotation guy whose roster spot became questionable when the Patriots added Derrick Burgess. So they dealt him to Denver, which now runs a similar defensive system and needs all the DL help and depth it can find. Smith will make the Broncos, which makes the draft pick worth it to Denver.

Chiefs (add WR Ashley Lelie) – Lelie, a former first-round pick, has the speed to get deep but has never been consistent in any of his four NFL stops. He’s another vet receiver, like Bobby Engram and Amani Toomer, whom the Chiefs have brought in for depth. It’s hard to imagine all of those vets making the team, so Lelie will probably have to better Toomer to earn a roster spot.

Bengals (add TE J.P. Foschi) – Foschi, a former Raider, is a veteran who could help to fill in for the injured Reggie Kelly as a block-first tight end.

Ravens (add QB Cleo Lemon) – Lemon was brought in as a camp arm to help the Ravens after third-string QB John Beck hurt his collarbone. Like Beck, Lemon played for offensive coordinator Cam Cameron, so he’s a fill-in who could step in to the No. 3 role comfortably.

Subtractions

Saints (cut CB Jason David) – David got huge money in 2007 to move from Indianapolis to New Orleans, but he couldn’t live up to the bill because he couldn’t make the transition from Indy’s cover-2 scheme and playing off the line to the more man-coverage-oriented scheme the Saints used. After watching him get burned time and time again, the Saints finally cut the cord. David could land somewhere that runs a 4-3 Tampa scheme, but in any other scheme he’s probably not much more than an emergency reserve. This once promising player really faces an uphill climb to rebuild his reputation.

Raiders (cut FB Lorenzo Neal) – Neal has long been one of the elite run-blocking fullbacks in the league, but a hamstring injury limited his ability to continue his career in Oakland this season. He might be done, and if he is, his career (which features two Pro Bowl appearances and blocking for 1,000-yard rushers in nine straight seasons) is one to celebrate.

Cowboys (cut DT Tim Anderson) – Anderson was once a Bills starter, but he’s played very little the last two seasons. It looks like his time as a contributor is now over based on this early training-camp release.

Leave a comment

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency