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FR: Preseason injuries

Each year, the preseason is full of injuries big and small. In this post, we seek to compare the importance of injuries that will sideline players for the entire season. We’re focusing only on injuries that happened in the preseason and in training camps. We will update this post through the fourth preseason game, both with new injuries and with official news that hurt players will miss the season.

Ryan Williams, via revengeofthebirds.com

10 – CB Terrell Thomas, Giants – Thomas had a breakout season last year, his second as a starter. He had five interceptions, a whopping 21 passes defensed, and four forced fumbles. He had emerged as a top-tier starting cornerback, and was preparing to cash in on the free agent market after the season. But then he suffered a torn ACL in the second preseason game against the Bears. Losing Thomas is a huge blow to the Giants – especially since rookie corner Prince Amakamura has missed most of camp because of injury. The Giants are now thin at a key position, and they’ll be playing without the best playmaker in their defensive back seven.

10 (con’t) – Browns OLG Eric Steinbach – Steinbach, a long-time starter for both Ohio teams, suffered a back injury that he couldn’t come back from. That’s a blow for the Browns, who don’t have a ton of veteran leadership anywhere – or a solid option to replace Steinbach.

10 (con’t) – TE Tony Moeaki, Chiefs -Moeaki, who had a strong rookie season for the Chiefs, suffered a knee injury in the preseason finale and landed on injured reserve. It’s a huge loss for the Chiefs, who relied on Moeaki as a consistent receiving threat last season. There’s no one on the roster with anywhere near the level of skill Moeaki had.

9 – Redskins DE Jarvis Jenkins – Jenkins, a second-round pick this year, had earned a starting job on Washington’s rebuilt defensive line at left end. But his strong rookie push ended in the third preseason game against the Ravens when he tore his ACL. Jenkins will miss the season. It’s a huge blow to Washington, which doesn’t have a ton of depth at defensive end and certainly doesn’t have a player to step in and make the impact Jenkins was starting to make.

9 (con’t) – TE John Carlson, Seahawks – Carlson is a solid starter at tight end, but a shoulder injury will shelve him for the season. It’s a blow for the Seahawks, but they signed Zach Miller in the offseason, who is an upgrade over Carlson. Still, it’s a blow for a productive youngster approaching free agency to miss an entire season.

9 (con’t) – MLB Jonathan Goff, Giants – Goff emerged as a starter at middle linebacker in his third season in 2010 and had a solid year. That led some observers to expect a breakout contract year in 2011. Instead, like fellow free-agent-to-be Terrell Thomas, Goff will miss the entire season after an ACL injury suffered in practice leading up to Week 1. It’s a another body blow to a Giants defense that has sustained too many this offseason.

8 – Cardinals RB Ryan Williams – Williams, the Cardinals’ second-round pick, looked to be a challenger to Beanie Wells’ starting job. But in the second preseason game against the Packers, Williams ruptured his patella tendon. He will miss the season.

8 (con’t) – Lions RB Mikel Leshoure – Leshoure, the Lions’ second-round pick, was expected to be the inside threat to pair with Jahvid Best. But Leshoure tore his Achilles in training camp and will miss the season. That’s a huge blow for the Lions, who have playoff aspirations after years of struggles but who don’t have a ton of depth – especially at running back.

7 – Panthers DT Ron Edwards – A couple of days after we discussed how important Edwards was to the Panthers, he suffered a torn triceps that will cost him the season. It’s a big blow to the Panthers, who were counting on Edwards to upgrade a thin position.

7 (con’t) – Panthers OG Geoff Schwartz – Schwartz, expected to be a starter this year at right guard, has a hip problem that will cost him the season. That’s a blow for a Panthers team that looked to have some offensive line continuity this year after missing Jeff Otah all last season.

7 (con’t) – Chiefs ILB Brandon Siler – Siler tore his Achilles in practice after the second preseason game, and will miss the season. He was signed from San Diego to be a starter and key player against the run, so his injury is a big blow to the Chiefs.

6 – Panthers WR David Gettis – Gettis, a second-year player who was on pace to start across from Steve Smith for the Panthers, tore his ACL and will miss the season. Gettis had a surprising rookie season with 37 catches for 508 yards and three TDs, so he will be missed. Now the Panthers need signee Legedu Naanee to emerge as a starter.

6 (con’t) – Cardinals CB Greg Toler – Toler, a third-year player, started 13 games for Arizona last year and was holding off Patrick Peterson for a starting job this year. But a torn left ACL suffered in the third preseason game will take Toler off the field this season. Now Peterson must be ready to start from Day 1, and the Cardinals also need to find some cornerback depth.

6 (con’t) – Jaguars RB Rashad Jennings – Jennings has proven to be a solid backup for Maurice Jones-Drew in Jacksonville, and Jones-Drew’s injury problems last year gave Jennings more of a role. But a knee injury will sideline Jennings for the year, leaving Deji Karim as the backup in Jacksonville.

5- Browns P Reggie Hodges – Hodges, who finally seized a full-time job in Cleveland last year (anda  former Crazy Kicker of the Week), suffered a torn Achilles during camp and will miss the season. The Browns brought in Richard McGee to fill in, but they’ll undoubtedly be checking the waiver wire to see if a veteran punter they like shakes free.

5 (con’t) – Giants DT Marvin Austin – Austin, a first-round level talent whom the Giants took in the second round after he missed the 2010 season due to NCAA rule violations, suffered a torn left pec and will miss the season. It’s a blow to the Giants, and now Austin will try to return from two years off the field – which won’t be an easy task.

5 (con’t) – Bills ILB Reggie Torbor – Torbor, who started seven games for the Bills last year, suffered a shoulder injury that will cost him the season. As a result, he’ll miss the season. The Bills signed Kirk Morrison to replace Torbor, which should be an upgrade, at least on running downs.

5 (con’t) – Browns RB Brandon Jackson – Jackson was one of Cleveland’s few free-agent signings this offseason. He was going to be a third-down back with receiving skills to supplement Peyton Hillis and Montario Hardesty. But a toe injury will cost the former Packer the season.

4 – Titans CB Ryan Mouton – Mouton, who has played cornerback and been a key special teams player, suffered a torn Achilles early in camp and will be out for the year. The 2009 third-round pick lost his returner job after several fumbles in 2009, but he was growing into a solid extra corner.

4 (con’t) – Steelers QB Byron Leftwich – Leftwich was in the running for the Steelers’ backup QB job, but he broke his left arm against the Falcons in the third preseason game and will miss the season. It’s not a huge blow for the Steelers, who still have Dennis Dixon and Charlie Batch in reserve.

4 (con’t) – Panthers OG Garry Williams – Williams had a chance to emerge as a starter at right guard for the Panthers after Geoff Schwartz’s injury, but he suffered a broken leg against the Steelers in the preseason finale and will miss the season. Williams was on the way to a roster spot, and losing him at a position of need was a big blow for the Panthers.

4 (con’t) – Giants OLB Clint Sintim – Sintim, a former second-round pick, was trying to come back from an ACL injury last season. But he tore the patella tendon in the same right knee he injured last year in the preseason finale, and will miss the year. Sintim was Mathias Kiwanuka’s backup and a versatile player, so losing him is certainly a blow to Big Blue.

4 (con’t) – Bengals TE Bo Scaife – Scaife, a free-agent signee this year, was supposed to be a versatile companion to Jermaine Gresham at tight end. Scaife’s a better blocker than Gresham while still being an effective receiver, but the Bengals’ WR depth should allow them to work around Scaife’s season-ending shoulder injury.

4 (con’t) – Seahawks DT Jimmy Wilkerson – Wilkerson, who has bounced around the league, suffered a knee injury in the final preseason game. He will miss the season. Seattle claimed Landon Cohen (fellow Spartanburg High School alum!) to replace Wilkerson.

3 – Giants CB Brian Witherspoon – Witherspoon, a backup corner, was the third Giants corner (after Terrell Thomas and Bruce Johnson) to be lost for the season. The ex-Jaguar and Lion, who played one game last season, was having a good camp and had a good chance to not only make the team but contribute until he, like Thomas, tore his ACL against the Bears. It’s another loss at a position getting deeper and deeper each day.

3 (con’t) – Broncos TE Richard Quinn – Quinn, a second-round pick in Josh McDaniels’ first draft in Denver, suffered an MCL injury early in the season, and Denver decided to put him on injured reserve. Quinn is a blocking tight end, but he looks to be getting caught up in the transition from McDaniels’ regime to the John Elway/John Fox group. Still, he once was a prospect, and losing his talent hurts.

3 (con’t) – Cardinals QB Max Hall – Hall, whom the Cardinals viewed as a potential future starter last year when he was an undrafted rookie, was waived injured after suffering a second injury to his non-throwing shoulder. After adding Kevin Kolb, the Cards only want to develop one young backup, and John Skelton is going to be the guy. Hall landed on injured reserve.

3 (con’t) – Broncos CB Syd’Quan Thompson – Thompson, a reserve cornerback for the Broncos, suffered a torn Achilles in the final preseason game. He will miss the season, taking away some of the Broncos’ secondary depth.

3 (con’t) Jets QB Greg McElroy – McElroy, a rookie, had played well as a No. 3 developmental quarterback until a thumb injury in the preseason finale shelved him. He’ll miss the season and more importantly the development he could have had as a rookie.

2 – Eagles DE Victor Abiamiri – Abiamiri suffered a ruptured Achilles and will miss the season. It’s the second straight season he’ll miss, after microfracture surgery on his knee sidelined him in 2010. Abiamiri, a 2007 second-round pick, had grown into a solid defensive end backup before his 2010 injury, but now his career has to be in question.

2 (con’t) – Steelers RB Baron Batch – Batch, a seventh-round rookie out of Texas Tech, was making a strong case for a roster spot before he tore his ACL in training camp. Now, he will miss the season.

2 (con’t) – Giants CB Bruce Johnson – Johnson, a third-year pro, suffered a torn Achilles early in camp and will miss the season. A knee injury cost him most of the 2010 season, but he had shown in 2009 that he’s a decent rotation cornerback. So it’s a loss for the Giants.

2 (con’t) – Vikings OG Scott Kooistra – Kooistra, a journeyman vet who was trying to win a job with Minnesota, suffered a serious neck injury in the second preseason game against the Seahawks. The injury could be career-ending.

1- 49ers TE Nate Byham – Byham, who developed immediately into a solid blocking tight end as a rookie last year, suffered a torn ACL early in camp and will miss the season. Byham was a sixth-round pick in 2010.

1 (con’t) – Saints OT Alex Barron – Barron, a first-round bust who was trying to win a job with the Saints, injured his knee in the preseason and will miss the season.

1 (con’t) – Bengals LB Roddrick Muckleroy – Muckelroy suffered a torn Achilles in the first week of Bengals camp and will miss the season. The 2010 fourth-round pick played 14 games as a rookie, mostly on special teams.

1 (con’t) – Panthers OG Zack Williams – Williams, a sixth-round pick, suffered a torn ACL and will miss his rookie season.

1 (con’t) – 49ers CB Curtis Holcomb – Holcomb, a seventh-round pick, suffered a torn Achilles early in training camp and will miss the season.

1 (con’t) – 49ers WR Dontavia Bogan – Bogan, an undrafted rookie, tore his ACL early in training camp.

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A big Little, and other Week 15 transactions

Each week we share insights, analysis, and opinions of the week’s transactions. To see previous posts, click this link and start working back.

The highlight transaction of the week came from a player who didn’t even see the field in 2010 – Rams DE Leonard Little, who retired on Wednesday. Little spent his entire 12-year career with the Rams, piling up 87.5 sacks. While he is primarily known for a drunk-driving incident in his second season that killed a woman, Little remained a Ram throughout his career. He was on the Rams’ Super Bowl winner in 1999 and made a Pro Bowl in 2003, which was one of his double-digit sack seasons. he didn’t play in 2010 and let the Rams know in December that he was hanging up his cleats after a solid career. You can compare Little’s career to the careers of other 2010 retirees in this updated post.

In this week’s other transactions…

Giants (put WR Steve Smith and LB Clint Sintim on injured reserve) – Smith, who has been battling a left knee injury, had to finally give up the ghost and go on injured reserve. It’s a loss to the Giants, but with Hakeem Nicks and Mario Manningham returning to health, at least it comes at a position of strength. Sintim is out for the rest of the season with a torn right ACL.

Vikings (put QB Tarvaris Jackson on injured reserve, add QB Patrick Ramsey) – Jackson suffered turf toe in his first start of the season Monday againts the Giants, and that injury ends not only his season but likely his Vikings tenure. Jackson has talent but has never been consistent enough to be a reliable starter. He could be a high-end backup QB somewhere in 2011, though. Ramsey comes on board to give the Vikings an emergency QB behind the injured Brett Favre and rookie Joe Webb.

Eagles (put DE Brandon Graham on injured reserve, add DE Derrick Burgess) – Graham, the Eagles’ first-round pick out of Michigan, suffered a torn right ACL last week. To replace him, the Eagles bring back Burgess, who spent the first four years of his career as an Eagle. Burgess can still provide a bit of pass-rush pop on occasion and should be a nice fit in a limited role.

Dolphins (put OT Vernon Carey on injured reserve, add WR Kevin Curtis) – Carey, the Dolphins’ standout right tackle, is out with a knee injury. Curtis, the former Ram and Eagle, missed most of the season coming back from testicular cancer that was diagnosed late in the summer. Here’s hoping he completes his comeback with solid play down the stretch.

Texans (put DE Mario Williams on injured reserve, add DE Jarvis Green) – The Texans set down Williams, whose injury recover has been too slow to make it back this season. Green, a long-time Patriot most recently with the Broncos, fills his roster spot.

Titans (put C Eugene Amano and DT Tony Brown on injured reserve) – The bad gets worse in Tennessee, as the Titans lose two starters for the rest of the year.

Redskins (cut P Hunter Smith, add P Sam Paulescu) – Smith, a veteran punter who botched a potential game-tying extra point last Sunday against Tampa Bay, was released in favor of Paulescu. Smith had a lot of good seasons with the Colts, but as a Redskin his punting distance faded as he aged. So it makes sense for the Redskins to bring in a younger guy in Paulescu to see if he can handle the job. Paulescu has punted for four teams, most notably in a 10-game stint with the Cowboys.

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Panthers/Giants thoughts

A few thoughts about the biggest issues raised in the Carolina Panthers’ blowout victory over the New York Giants in Week 16. Instead of listing a ton of minor issues, we’re going to focus on one big idea for each team.

For the Giants, this loss doomed their playoff hopes and effectively started the offseason for them. That’s a disappointment given not only the Giants’ strong play the last two years but also their 5-0 start this year. But changes are necessary if the Giants want to return to the top of the NFC East and league-wide relevance. Among those changes:
*The defense has sputtered this year in a big way. The injury to S Kenny Phillips early in the season certainly hurt, but the most disturbing thing has been Big Blue’s inability to get pressure on the quarterback consistently. That was a hallmark of the Giants the last two seasons, and the additions of Chris Canty, Rocky Bernard, and Clint Sintim in the offseason were supposed to enhance that strength. Instead, that strength became a weakness, to the point that New York must consider changing defensive coaches to address the issue. And on offense, a line that has played together for years is starting to crumble, and the marginal talents of the individuals that once were hidden by cohesion are now starting to show. New York needs a talent upgrade there, even at the expense of consistency. There are still a ton of pieces in place for the Giants, but these issues must be addressed.

For the Panthers, the quarterback question has become front and center. Whenever I do a radio show here in the Carolinas, or just have a conversation with a local football fan, this is the question that’s at the forefront of the discussion. Jake Delhomme’s massive failings this year (as we’ll detail in a post on the biggest what-ifs of the season next week) cost the Panthers several games, and it would be foolhardy for the Panthers to go into the season expecting him to start. The Panthers will carry a $13 million cap hit for Delhomme next year, but if the league enters an uncapped year, that won’t prohibit them from cutting him. From my time observing and even covering the Panthers, I believe that they won’t be afraid to pay that charge if they desire to move on. But even if Delhomme stays, at most he can compete for a starting spot. Carolina cannot give him more than that. Backup Matt Moore, meanwhile, continues to show enough promise to be an intriguing starting candidate. After going 2-1 as a starter in 2007 – and winning league December rookie of the month honors along the way – Moore is now 3-1 as a starter this year. He has thrown three touchdown passes in each of the last two games against the Vikings and the Giants, and he has shown a knack for getting the ball downfield to Steve Smith and Carolina’s other receivers. Is Matt Moore, like Tony Romo, an undrafted gem? Is he just a December star? You don’t know, but if the Panthers want to enter next season with Moore competing with Delhomme, an imported veteran, or even a rookie to be the starter, that plan would be acceptable. I wouldn’t have given Moore that much credit a couple of weeks ago, but his continued solid performances make him a prospect. And since the Panthers don’t have a first-round pick – and since the free agent market should feature Jason Campbell and not much else – Moore is a candidate the Panthers must consider strongly.

Of course, if Carolina makes a change at head coach from John Fox or at general manager from Marty Hurney, all this goes up in the air. But that kind of change looks less likely with the team’s strong recent play, as it looks like Delhomme may have been central to the Panthers’ problems. And if that’s the case, Moore is a player to watch in the offseason.

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Jersey Numbers: Linebackers

This is our next to last post choosing the best players at each position by jersey number. If you have quibbles, leave a comment and we’ll update this post. And please have patience – this is a big job.

We started this project with wide receivers in this post and then with tight ends in this post and quarterbacks in this post and running backs in this post and offensive linemen in this post and kickers/punters in this post and defensive linemen in this post. Now we move to linebackers, who can wear numbers in the 50s and the 90s with a few exceptions. If a number is omitted, it’s because no linebacker who has played this season wears those digits.

46 – Vinny Ciurciu, Lions – Ciurciu is the only linebacker currently wearing 46. He has played in six games this year, seeing most of his action on special teams. Now with his fourth team, Ciurciu also has a good locker-room nickname (see the bottom of the linked post).

47 – Brit Miller, 49ers – Miller is the only linebacker currently wearing 47. The rookie out of Illinois has played in two games this season.

49 – Zack Follett, Lions – Follett is the only linebacker currently wearing 49. The rookie out of Cal has played in nine games this year, mostly on special teams.

50 – Curtis Lofton, Falcons – Lofton, a second-year middle linebacker, has emerged as a tackle machine for the Falcons. His growth allowed the Dirty Birds to let stalwart Keith Brooking leave via free agency, and now it’s Lofton who will lead Atlanta’s defense for years to come. Lofton is tied for second in the NFL with 118 tackles. We give him the nod over OLB Mike Vrabel, who had great years in New England and is now a veteran leader in Kansas City. Other notable 50s: Russell Allen, Jaguars; James Anderson, Panthers; K.C. Asiodu, Rams; Antwan Barnes, Ravens; Eric Barton, Browns; Monty Beisel, Cardinals; Rocky Boiman, Steelers; Diyral Briggs, 49ers; Isaiah Ekejiuba, Raiders; Vernon Gholston, Jets; A.J. Hawk, Packers; Erin Henderson, Vikings; Lance Laury, Seahawks; Matt McCoy, Buccaneers; Marvin Mitchell, Saints; Rob Ninkovich, Patriots; Ernie Sims, Lions; David Thornton, Titans; Erik Walden, Dolphins; Philip Wheeler, Colts; Will Witherspoon, Eagles

51 – Barrett Ruud, Tampa Bay Buccaneers – Ruud has emerged as a do-everything middle linebacker for the Buccaneers, and he’s one of the few bright spots on the team’s defense. He’s fifth in the league with 113 tackles and also has six passes defensed. He gets the nod over Jonathan Vilma of New Orleans, who may be better in pass coverage. Also worth mentioning are long-time veterans Keith Brooking of Dallas, James Farrior of Pittsburgh, and Takeo Spikes of the 49ers; youngsters Jerod Mayo of the Patriots and Paul Posluszny of Buffalo; and injured Seahawks MLB Lofa Tatupu. Other notable 51s: Brendon Ayanbadejo, Ravens; Akin Ayodele, Dolphins; Tim Diles, Chargers; Ryan Fowler, Jets; Tony Gilbert, Falcons; Alex Hall, Browns; Clint Ingram, Colts; Ben Leber, Vikings; Corey Mays, Chiefs; Joe Mays, Eagles; Gerald McRath, Titans; Brady Poppinga, Packers; Dan Skuta, Bengals; Chaun Thompson, Texans

52 – Ray Lewis, Ravens – This is a loaded number that features Pro Bowl-caliber linebackers in Carolina MLB Jon Beason, San Francisco MLB Patrick Willis, and Jets ILB David Harris, but Lewis gets the nod for his long, productive career that continues at a very high level. Other notable youngsters include rookie Clay Matthews of Green Bay, Kirk Morrison of Oakland, Daryl Smith of Jacksonville, and injured Browns ILB D’Qwell Jackson. Other notable 52s: Xavier Adibi, Texans; Eric Alexander, Patriots;  Michael Boley, Giants; Cody Brown, Cardinals; Jonathan Casillas, Saints; Channing Crowder, Dolphins; Chris Draft, Bills; Larry English, Chargers; Cody Glenn, Colts; Chad Greenway, Vikings; David Herron, Chiefs; Abdul Hodge, Bengals; D.D. Lewis, Seahawks;  Rocky McIntosh, Redskins; Jamar Williams, Bears; Coy Wire, Falcons

53 – Keith Bulluck, Titans – Bulluck has long been the emotional leader of the Titans’ defense, and he remains a solid sideline-to-sideline player. His three interceptions tie him for the lead among linebackers, and his 10 passes defensed place him second at the position. He’s also among the top 10 in tackles for linebackers. That’s enough to give him the nod over Atlanta’s Mike Peterson, another long-time, solid performer. Other notable 53s: Marcus Buggs, Bills; Derrick Burgess, Patriots; Khary Campbell, Texans; Na’il Diggs, Panthers; Moise Fokou, Eagles; Clark Haggans, Cardinals; James Holt, Chargers; Thomas Howard, Raiders; Larry Izzo, Jets; Rashad Jeanty, Bengals; Bryan Kehl, Giants; Niko Koutouvides, Buccaneers; Paris Lenon, Rams; Jameel McClain, Ravens; Tyrone McKenzie, Patriots; Steve Octavien, Cowboys; Nick Roach, Bears; Matt Roth, Browns; Mark Simoneau, Saints; Bryan Smith, Jaguars; Reggie Torbor, Dolphins; Jeff Ulbrich, 49ers; Demorrio Williams, Chiefs

54 – Andra Davis, Broncos – This number lost its stalwart when Brian Urlacher of Chicago was knocked out for the season. So among a group of solid if unspectacular inside linebackers, we’ll give Davis the nod for his contributions (72 tackles, 3.5 sacks) in reinvigorating the Denver defense. Other contenders were Chargers ILB Stephen Cooper and Titans MLB Stephen Tulloch. Other notable 54s: H.B. Blades, Redskins; Jasper Brinkley, Vikings; Prescott Burgess, Ravens; Bobby Carpenter, Cowboys; Brandon Chillar, Packers; Blake Costanzo, Browns; Kenwin Cummings, Jets; Zac Diles, Texans; Troy Evans, Saints; Andre Frazier, Steelers; Jonathan Goff, Giants; Nic Harris, Bills; Geno Hayes, Buccaneers; Gerald Hayes, Cardinals; Will Herring, Seahawks; Freddie Keiaho, Colts; DeAndre Levy, Lions; Stephen Nicholas, Falcons; Jeremiah Trotter, Eagles; Tracy White, Eagles; Sam Williams, Raiders

55 – Terrell Suggs, Ravens – This is a tough call, because Suggs has just 3.5 sacks this season and has missed three games. But on the whole, he’s the most complete linebacker at this position, because he can be a dynamite pass rusher and also do well against the run and in coverage. I’d rather have Suggs that Miami OLB Joey Porter, who has eight sacks thus far this season, or Chicago’s playmaking WLB Lance Briggs, who stars in the featured position in the old Tampa 2 defense the Bears run. Other solid vets wearing 55 include Detroit’s Larry Foote and Denver’s D.J. Williams, while youngsters Clint Session of Indianapolis and James Laurinaitis of St. Louis deserve mention as well. Other notable 55s: Jon Alston, Raiders; Patrick Bailey, Steelers; Desmond Bishop, Packers; Alvin Bowen, Redskins; Stewart Bradley, Eagles; Ahmad Brooks, 49ers; Danny Clark, Giants; Dan Connor, Panthers; Scott Fujita, Saints; Stephen Hodge, Cowboys; Kawika Mitchell, Bills; Kenny Onatolu, Vikings; Keith Rivers, Bengals; Justin Rogers, Chiefs; Junior Seau, Patriots; Reggie Walker, Cardinals; Jamaal Westerman, Jets

56 – Brian Cushing, Texans – It’s hard to imagine giving a rookie like Cushing the honor at a highly populated number like this one, but Cushing has earned it. He’s sixth among linebackers with 116 tackles and also has 2.5 sacks, 3 interceptions, 12 passes defensed, 2 forced fumbles, and a safety. That’s huge impact that earns him the nod over Shawne Merriman of San Diego, who isn’t the same after last season’s knee injury, pass-rushing stud LaMarr Woodley of Pittsburgh, and solid all-around players Nick Barnett of Green Bay and Bradie James of Dallas. Other notable 56s: Colin Allred, Titans; Charlie Anderson, Dolphins; Robert Ayers, Broncos; Quinton Culbertson, Panthers; Jo-Lonn Dunbar, Saints; Justin Durant, Jaguars; Keith Ellison, Bills; Tavares Gooden, Ravens; Tyjuan Hagler, Colts; E.J. Henderson, Vikings; Leroy Hill, Seahawks; Derrick Johnson, Chiefs; Akeem Jordan, Eagles; Kaluka Maiava, Browns; Scott McKillop, 49ers; David Nixon, Raiders; Chike Okeafor, Cardinals; Rod Wilson, Buccaneers

57 – Bart Scott, Jets – New Jets head coach Rex Ryan brought Scott with him from Baltimore as a high-dollar free agent to be the emotional leader and scheme expert in the middle of Gang Green’s defense. Scott has played fine for the Jets, but over the year it’s been fellow ILB David Harris who has emerged as a top-tier player. Still, Scott gets the nod over veteran Dhani Jones of Cincinnati and David Hawthorne, who’s having a terrific season as a fill-in starter at middle linebacker for Seattle. Other notable 57s: Stanley Arnoux, Saints; Kevin Bentley, Texans; Chase Blackburn, Giants; Ricky Brown, Raiders; Victor Butler, Cowboys; Chris Chamberlain, Saints; Jon Corto, Bills; Jordon Dizon, Lions; Keyaron Fox, Steelers; Chris Gocong, Eagles; Mario Haggan, Broncos; Adam Hayward, Buccaneers; Jordan Senn, Panthers; David Veikune, Browns; Matt Wilhelm, 49ers

58 – Karlos Dansby, Cardinals – It’s hard to imagine a better physical specimen at outside linebacker than Dansby, who is a leader on a strong Cardinals defense. He gets the nod over Gary Brackett, an undersized middle linebacker at the heart of the Colts defense. Other notable 58s: Marcus Benard, Browns; Quincy Black, Buccaneers; Thomas Davis, Panthers; Marques Harris, Chargers; Robert Henson, Redskins; Rey Maualuga, Bengals; Slade Norris, Raiders; Antonio Pierce, Giants; Scott Shanle, Saints; Tim Shaw, Bears; David Vobora, Rams; Jason Williams, Cowboys; Pierre Woods, Patriots

59 – London Fletcher, Redskins – Fletcher doesn’t have ideal size, but year after year he is a leader, a reliable tackler, and a playmaker, no matter what team he’s playing for. He’s a great success story as an undrafted player. He gets the nod over Julian Peterson of Detroit and DeMeco Ryans of Houston. Other notable 59s: Spencer Adkins, Falcons; Jovan Belcher, Chiefs; Angelo Crowell, Buccaneers; Aaron Curry, Seahawks; Dannell Ellerbe, Ravens; Heath Farwell, Vikings; Larry Grant, Rams; Gary Guyton, Patriots; Ramon Humber, Colts; Brian Iwuh, Jaguars; Brandon Johnson, Bengals; Landon Johnson, Panthers; Brad Jones, Packers; Cato June, Bears; Stanford Keglar, Titans; Ashlee Palmer, Bills; Brandon Siler, Chargers; Pisa Tinoisamoa, Bears; Gerris Wilkerson, Giants; Brandon Williams, Cowboys; Wesley Woodyard, Broncos

74 – Aaron Kampman, Packers – Kampman, who moved from defensive end to outside ‘backer this season as Green Bay implemented a 3-4 defense, kept his old D-lineman number. Kampman didn’t have a great transition season, with just 3.5 sacks in nine games before suffering a season-ending injury. But he’s still a good player, and he’s the only linebacker wearing 74, so he merits a mention.

90 – No linebackers wearing 90 have played a game this season.

91 – Tamba Hali, Chiefs – Hali is emerging as a solid pass rusher in Kansas City, with 7.5 sacks thus far this season. He gets the nod at this number over Cameron Wake, Miami’s CFL import who has 5.5 sacks in his first NFL season.

92 – Elvis Dumervil, Broncos – In one of the toughest calls of this whole project, we’re going with Dumervil, the NFL leader with 15 sacks, over 2008 Defensive Player of the Year James Harrison of Pittsburgh. Both guys play outside linebacker in a 3-4 defense, and both add the fright factor to their respective defenses. But while Harrison may be a better player in pass coverage, Dumervil is having a defensive player of the year caliber campaign in Denver, and so for 2009 we have to opt for him. Other notable 92s: Bertrand Berry, Cardinals; Hunter Hillenmeyer, Bears

93 – Anthony Spencer, Cowboys – Spencer has been a disappointment at outside ‘backer since the Cowboys made him a first-round pick three years ago, but as a full-time player he gets the nod over Jason Trusnik, who has moved into the starting lineup in Cleveland after a midseason trade from the Jets.

94 – DeMarcus Ware, Cowboys – Ware is a preeminent pass rusher with nine sacks this year and 62.5 in five seasons so far. Also deserving mention is Lawrence Timmons, an emerging inside ‘backer for the Steelers. Other notable 94s: Arnold Harrison, Browns; Marques Murrell, Jets; Jyles Tucker, Chargers

95 – Shaun Phillips, Chargers – In a close call, the nod here goes to Phillips, a pass-rushing outside ‘backer who has seven sacks for San Diego, over Cleveland OLB Kamerion Wimbley, who has 6.5 sacks. The six fumbles Phillips has forced was the determining factor. We’ll also shout out to Baltimore’s Jarret Johnson, another emerging pass-rusher. Other notable 95s: Tully Banta-Cain, Patriots; Ali Highsmith, Cardinals

96 – David Bowens, Browns – Bowens came with Eric Mangini from the Jets to Cleveland. He has long been an above-average pass-rushing outside ‘backer, and he has five sacks in that role this season. He gets the nod over declining Patriot Adalius Thomas. Other notable 96s: Omar Gaither, Eagles; Andy Studebaker, Chiefs

97 – Calvin Pace, Jets – Pace missed the first four games of the season due to a performance-enhancing drug suspension, but since returning he has continued to provide pass rush off the edge with six sacks. Other notable 97s: Clint Sintim, Giants; Pierre Walters, Chiefs

98 – Brian Orakpo, Redskins – Orakpo, Washington’s first-round pick, has 11 sacks in his rookie season, including four last week against Oakland. That’s the kind of defensive jolt Washington was hoping for when it drafted him. Other notable 98s: Shawn Crable, Patriots; Parys Haralson, 49ers; Darrell McClover, Bears

99 – Jason Taylor, Dolphins – Taylor spent most of his career as a 4-3 defensive end, but he has seamlessly made the transition to a 3-4 outside linebacker over the last few years. After a slow season in his one campaign in Washington, Taylor has six sacks this year for Miami, giving him 126.5 in his 13-year career. Other notable 99s: Kevin Burnett, Chargers; Paul Kruger, Ravens; Manny Lawson, 49ers; Bryan Thomas, Jets; Jeremy Thompson, Packers

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FR: Minicamp carnage

There are always a few notable injuries during minicamps and other “organized team activities,” and it seems like this year draft picks have been especially susceptible. So we decided to compare these injuries using football relativity, with 10 as the most significant and 1 being a mere footnote. Note that we will update this comparison until training camps begin in August.

10 – CB Walt Harris, 49ers – Harris, a 13-year veteran, tore the ACL in his right knee in minicamp and will miss the season. The former Bears first-round pick has 15 interceptions in his three seasons as a 49er and has started all but two games the past two years. In fact, he has 35 career picks, and he started at least 12 games in all but one of his 13 seasons. (He served as a regular nickelback in that campaign.) Harris provided veteran wile for the 49ers, and it will be missed. It will be too bad if this is how Harris’ solid if unspectacular career ends.

9 – OT Robert Brewster, Cowboys – The third-round pick injured his biceps in June, and it was announced just before training camp that the injury would cost Brewster the season. Brewster was slated to be a backup in Dallas in 2009, but losing a year of such a high draft pick is a blow to any team.

8 – WR Derrius Heyward-Bey, Raiders – Heyward-Bey, the seventh overall pick in the draft, suffered a hamstring injury May 9 that appeared minor, but all the way into June it was keeping him out of OTA work. Again, this is an injury that probably won’t matter much physically in September, but the lack of reps could matter in Heyward-Bey’s development. That’s especially true at receiver, which is usually a position at which rookies struggle. This hamstring injury could end up making it even harder for Heyward-Bey to contribute right away for the Raiders, who desperately need his big-play ability.

8 (con’t) – DT Peria Jerry, Falcons – Jerry, a first-round pick, got dinged up with a knee injury. It looks like more of a scare than a long-term factor, but his status as an expected impact starter pushes him up the chart of this comparison. The Falcons need Jerry if their defense is to be playoff-caliber, and so missing time to develop in the offseason matters.

7 – CB Terrence McGee, Bills – McGee is a standout returner and an emerging corner who will play a prominent role in Buffalo now that Jabari Greer is gone. McGee and Leodis McKelvin could potentially combine to be a top-level CB duo. McGee injured his arm trying to cover Terrell Owens in practice in May, and the injury cost him the rest of the Bills’ minicamps and OTAs. That was enough to put a big scare in the Bills, because McGee is a vital player for the Bills this season.

6 – LB Stanley Arnoux, Saints – The Saints viewed Arnoux as a possible starter at weak-side ‘backer and as a special-teams dynamo, but now he’ll miss the year with a ruptured left Achilles. It will be interesting to see if Arnoux’s absence affects his former Wake Forest teammate and current roommate S Chip Vaughn’s adjustment to the pros. For a team as short on draft picks as the Saints, losing a fourth-rounder this early hurts.

5 – ILB Tyrone McKenzie, Patriots – McKenzie, a third-round pick, suffered a torn ACL in his right knee in minicamp. He wasn’t expected to start this season, but his long-term prognosis as Tedy Bruschi’s eventual replacement is murkier now because of the injury that will knock him out for ’09.

4 – DE-OLB Clint Sintim, Giants – Sintim, a second-round pick, pulled a hamstring in OTAs. Giants coach Tom Coughlin said the injury, which isn’t serious, still wouldn’t help either Sintim or the team. This kind of injury sets back a rookie’s development, and because Sintim is trying to move from playing linebacker in a 3-4 defense at Virginia to becoming a pass rusher at the end and as a ‘backer in the Giants’ 4-3, he needs all the reps he can get. The Giants can only hope Sintim is ready to go in training camp and that the on-the-job training he’s missing doesn’t set him back too much.

4 (con’t) –  QB Ben Roethlisberger, Steelers – Roethlisberger suffered a June knee injury that knocked him out for just a day, but the fact that a Super Bowl winning quarterback got dinged up is still worth a mention. He doesn’t need the reps, but he does need to be 100 percent going into training camp, given the beating that quarterbacks take and the still tenuous status of the Steelers’ offensive line.

4 (con’t) – WR Anthony Gonzalez, Colts – Gonzalez, who is moving up to the No. 2 receiver spot for Indy this year, injured his right leg in early June, which cost him half a week of work. While Gonzalez should be OK come training camp, his absence highlighted the fact that the Colts are painfully thin at receiver. Now that Marvin Harrison is gone, Reggie Wayne and Gonzalez are the only two proven receivers that Indy has. While that’s a really good duo, an injury to either Wayne or Gonzalez would make Peyton Manning’s job a lot more difficult because he would have to rely heavily on rookie Austin Collie or holdovers Pierre Garcon, Roy Hall, or Sam Giguere (who has missed offseason work because of a broken leg he suffered in an earlier minicamp). This means that, although he’s still a young, emerging player, Gonzalez might actually be one of the more indispensible players in the league given the Colts’ roster.

3  – WR Isaiah Stanback, Cowboys – Stanback suffered a torn meniscus in his right knee, and the resulting surgery and rehab will knock him out of action until the start of training camp. Stanback has just 2 catches and 13 kickoff returns since joining the Cowboys as a fourth-round pick in ’07, but with Terrell Owens leaving there’s room for someone like Stanback, Miles Austin, or Sam Hurd to step up and serve as a No. 3 receiver behind Roy Williams and Patrick Crayton. Stanback was already a longer shot than Austin or Hurd, who have both had their moments, and this injury certainly won’t help his case.

2 – none

1 – CB Morgan Trent, Bengals – Trent suffered a foot injury that will shelve him until training camp. That won’t help his chances of making the team, which is no sure thing for any sixth-rounder like Trent. But this injury won’t damage the Bengals long term.

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FR: 2009 NFL Draft review

After putting out first (and second) thoughts on the draft, and sharing some local knowledge, we now want to take time to compare each team’s draft class to each other. Because draft grades are just as useless as power rankings, we’re going to do this the Football Relativity way. We’ll compare each team’s haul to the others, with the best hauls at 10 on the scale and the worst haul at 1.

10 – Patriots – The Patriots traded down (as usual), but they got a load of talent. Second-rounders DT Ron Brace and CB Darius Butler were great picks, and I expect S Patrick Chung and OT Sebastian Vollmer to become starters as well. Then there’s third-rounder Brandon Tate, who was a first-round talent before a knee injury and a reported positive drug test dropped his stock. There are at least three and maybe five hits there, not even considering the guys they picked later. Plus, New England amassed two extra second-round picks next year. This was exactly the kind of draft a veteran contender needs to restock and continue moving forward.

9 – Jets – This was a completely opposite draft from New England’s, but just as effective. The price to move up to get QB Mark Sanchez was right, and the Jets showed enough gumption to pay it. (I actually think the Jets might have ended up paying less in the trade to move to 5 than they would have to move to 8.) Sanchez sets the Jets up long term, which is the best thing you can do in a draft. Shonn Greene is a good running back, and given Leon Washington’s impending free agency and Thomas Jones’ contract squabble, that could quickly become a position of need for Gang Green.

8 – Giants – Jerry Reese has quickly established himself as a good drafter, and he did a good job again. First-rounder  WR Hakeem Nicks has a world of talent and produced at a high level in college, and he’s at a need position. The question is whether the pressure to replace Plaxico Burress overwhelms Nicks and hinders his development. Getting OT William Beatty and OLB Clint Sintim in the second round was really good value and fortifies the Giants’ biggest strengths. Both should be starter-caliber down the line. Ramses Barden is a huge receiver who is an intriguing prospect, and fourth-round Andre Brown could end up replacing Derrick Ward as fire in the RB troika. The Giants will continue as one of the league’s deepest teams with this draft class.

8 (con’t) – Eagles – For a team that didn’t have third- or fourth-round picks, the Eagles had a surprisingly deep draft. First-rounder Jeremy Maclin is a really good WR prospect and could combine with DeSean Jackson to finally give the Eagles a good (if smallish) receiving corps. Second-rounder LeSean McCoy provides depth at running back that is essential because of Correll Buckhalter’s departure and Brian Westbrook’s tendency to get dinged. Fifth-round TE Cornelius Ingram is an intersting prospect if he can overcome a knee injury, and CB Macho Harris was a productive college player. There’s not a lot of line help here, but because the Eagles usually focus there, it’s OK to go away from that for a year.

8 (con’t) – Rams – The Rams didn’t do anything fancy, but they got a massive talent infusion that was sorely needed. OT Jason Smith could end up being the best player in the draft, and second-round LB James Laurinaitis will become the cornerstone of the defense. That’s a great start. On the second day, the Rams got a developmental corner in Bradley Fletcher and a defensive tackle, Dorrell Scott, who should be in a rotation right away and could eventually anchor the defense. All in all, it was a great weekend for St. Louis.

7 – Ravens – While some have questions about Michael Oher, the worst-case scenario for him is that he’s an above-average right tackle. That’s a good find at 23. OLB Paul Kruger (second round) and ILB Jason Phillips (fifth round) will fit into this defense as well. All in all, another solid haul from a team that’s annually one of the best on draft day.

7 (con’t) – Texans – I liked the pick of OLB Brian Cushing in the first round. He’s the kind of player who can help take the Texans’ defense to the next level. (Remember, the Texans already have front-line playmakers like DEs Mario Williams and Antonio Smith and DT Amobi Okoye, plus LB DeMeco Ryans.) Connor Barwin seems to be a fit too, and as a pass-rush specialist, he’ll provide immediate value. Antoine Caldwell is a solid offensive lineman as well. And people raved about TE James Casey’s athleticism, so he’s an interesting fifth-round pick to watch.

7 (con’t) – Bengals – Cincinnati took a lot of home-run swings in this class – OT Andre Smith, ILB Rey Maualuga, DE Michael Johnson among them. If all three hit, this is a franchise-making class. But there’s a chance (not huge, but not miniscule either) that all three could miss. So I can’t put this class at the top of the list. Still, this is a needed talent infusion. I liked the pick of TE Chase Coffman at the end of the third round; he could start right away. P Kevin Huber will also step right in, because the Bengals cleared out their other punters right after the draft.

7 (con’t) – Packers – Green Bay is switching to a 3-4 defense, and unlike some other switching teams (this means you, Denver), they tried to actually fill the holes in their D that this switch creates. B.J. Raji is the nose tackle that makes this kind of defense stout against the run, so he made sense at No. 9 overall. I don’t love Clay Matthews as a prospect, but he can play outside ‘backer and rush the passer while also dropping into coverage, so it made sense for Green Bay to deal back into the end of the first round to get him. They still need the DeMarcus Ware type of pass rush phenom to really make the D click, but you can’t get everything at once. Green Bay also got some interior OL help in the form of second-day picks T.J. Lang and Jamon Meredith. This is a solid, need-driven draft that doesn’t have elite talent but that does have good players who will help in ’09 and beyond.

7 (con’t) – 49ers – I’ve documented my love for Michael Crabtree, and so of course I’m going to rave about the fact that the Niners got him at No. 10 overall. San Fran also got an extra first-round pick next year, which is great value but prevented this class from being truly stocked. Third-round RB Glen Coffee will help relieve Frank Gore, while fifth-round LB Scott McKillop will be a solid two-down player. And seventh-round DT Ricky Jean-Francois is a talent who underperformed this year but who could emerge once again.

6 – Bills – I think that Brian Orakpo was a better player than Aaron Maybin, so I didn’t love the fact that the Bills opted for Maybin. But most people think that Eric Wood (28th overall) and Andy Levitre (2nd round) will become offensive line starters inside. I would have preferred a tackle at 28 instead of Wood, but if he becomes a solid starter, that’s OK. All in all, this was a solid draft, but it didn’t have the pop that would have helped after the Jason Peters trade.

6 (con’t) – Jaguars – OTs Eugene Monroe and Eben Britton provide help at a huge need area right off the bat, and I like the fact that Jacksonville overloaded there. Free-agent acquisition Tra Thomas signed a one-year deal, so by 2010 both Monroe and Britton could be starting. The Jags also needed wideouts, and they drafted three, including Mike Thomas, who is probably the best prospect. He was a good fourth-round value. This looks to be a solid draft class.

6 (con’t) – Lions – The Lions did what they had to do in opting for QB Matthew Stafford with the No. 1 overall pick and signing him before the draft. He’s the best QB talent in this class; now it’s on him to develop and the Lions to coach him up. TE Brandon Pettigrew should help that development as a safety-valve receiver and blocker. Louis Delmas should be a starting safety, and Derrick Williams should be an eventual starter at wide receiver. I would have preferred the Lions to get some more OL help, but they had so many needs that every pick makes sense. This is an infusion of talent that will help, although the Lions need several more booster shots before they’re healthy again.

6 (con’t) – Cardinals – The Cards have secretly been a team that has drafted well over the past several years, and they followed that trend again this year. First-round RB Beanie Wells should be a starter complementing Tim Hightower right away. Arizona was lucky that he fell to them. Third-round S Rashad Johnson is the real deal as well. DE Cody Brown helps to replace the departed Antonio Smith and Travis LaBoy, and I’m intrigued to see how OT Herman Johnson’s massive size translates to the NFL. Lots of hits once again in Arizona.

6 (con’t) – Steelers – This was a typical Steelers draft – not flashy but full of solid players. Ziggy Hood is a good value as a defensive lineman, and OL Kraig Urbik steps into the team’s biggest need area. Seventh-round C A.Q. Shipley could end up as a starter, and pretty soon. Add two corners (Keenan Lewis and Joe Burnett) to another need area, and you have a draft class that allows Pittsburgh to continue moving forward.

5 – Titans – The Titans didn’t need a lot of immediate help, so this draft is about filling in cracks instead of filling chasms. First-rounder Kenny Britt is a good prospect who will probably need a couple of years, but he’s a talent at a spot where the Titans haven’t had enough skill over the years. DT Sen’Derrick Marks is probably the guy out of this class the Titans most need to play immediately. He’s a talent, but his production hasn’t been ideal. But given the Titans’ strong coaching staff and especially DL coach Jim Washburn, he’s worth the risk. TE Jared Cook is a good prospect, and RB Javon Ringer is good insurance in case LenDale White doesn’t keep his weight down.

5 (con’t) – Redskins – The reason you don’t trade future first-round picks is that you never know when a player the caliber of DE Brian Orakpo will fall to you. The Redskins patience was rewarded with the best DE in the draft and a guy who should provide a solid pass rush for years to come. There’s not a wealth of depth in this draft because of pre-draft trades, but getting a premium prospect in Orakpo keeps the Redskins pretty high in the comparison.

5 (con’t) – Bears – The Bears were one of two teams without a first-day pick, but they did much better on the second day than Dallas did. Third-round DT Jarron Gilbert is a talent who needs coaching, and the Bears have one of the league’s best DL coaches in Rod Marinelli. (Bad head coach, great position coach) Wide receiver was Chicago’s biggest need area, and Joaquin Iglesias is a good prospect there, while Johnny Knox is an intriguing sleeper. Fourth-round CB D.J. Moore is undersized, but he was a terrific college player who I believe will contribute as a starter eventually, a la current Bear (and former fourth-round pick) Nathan Vasher. This is a solid class of second-day prospects.

5 (con’t) – Falcons – This is another draft that isn’t sexy but that is very functional. DT Peria Jerry will help inside, and S William Moore is a talent who is a potential starter if he gets good coaching and responds to it. I like fourth-round DE Lawrence Sidbury as a John Abraham-lite pass rusher, especially given Abraham’s tendency to miss time. Even the last two picks, LB Spencer Adkins and DT Vance Walker, could contribute in the Falcons’ system. There isn’t great impact here, but the Falcons continue to fill out their roster.

5 (con’t) – Saints – The Saints didn’t have a lot of picks because of trades for Jonathan Vilma and Jeremy Shockey, but they used the picks they did have on defense. First-rounder Malcolm Jenkins should be the best cornerback out of this class, and he’s big enough to play either corner or safety. New Orleans needs him to emerge as a corner, in part because fourth-round FS Chip Vaughn is a potential starter as well. If the Saints get two secondary starters out of this few picks, that’s good work.

5 (con’t) – Seahawks – Getting Aaron Curry at No. 4 was a boon for Seattle, and second-rounder Max Unger is an immediate starter as well. While these guys don’t play high-impact positions, they will become core players. Third-round receiver Deon Butler steps into a need area as well. Not having fourth- or fifth-round picks limits the depth of this class, but Seattle did well with its first three selections.

4 – Dolphins- Vontae Davis was probably the most talented corner in the draft aside from Malcolm Jenkins, although he didn’t play to his talent last year. Still, at the bottom of the first round, he’s a good pick. I don’t know what to think about the Pat White selection in the second round. What’s White’s upside? The Dolphins already think that Chad Henne is their quarterback of the future, so White is blocked there. Can White really be a starting receiver? The fact that Miami drafted Patrick Turner and Brian Hartline in the middle rounds would indicate that the Dolphins don’t think so. So are we looking at White as a Wildcat-offense specialist? I might be wrong, but I don’t think that niche role is worth a high second-round pick.

4 (con’t) – Vikings – This was another risky draft class. First-rounder Percy Harvin has blinding speed, and could be a game-breaker. But he’s not a true wide receiver, and his off-field concerns make him a question mark. The Vikings will have to tweak their schemes to really maximize Harvin’s talents. Second-round OT Phil Loadholt is a load who can play right tackle, but there are comportment questions about him as well. CB Asher Allen was good but inconsistent in college, while fifth-round LB Jasper Brinkley battled injuries in his college career. It’s hard to tell whether this class will end up being great or disappointing, so we have to leave them in the middle for now.

4 (con’t) – Colts – RB Donald Brown is a good player, and the Colts had some need there because of Joseph Addai’s tendency to get dinged up. But the Colts are trying to alter their defensive system, and they didn’t get enough help there. DT Fili Moala has a reputation as a bit of an underachiever, but he and Terrance Taylor at least provide size inside. The Colts need P Pat McAfee needs to win the job right off the bat after letting Hunter Smith leave. This isn’t an eye-popping draft, but there is some help here.

4 (con’t) – Chiefs – DE Tyson Jackson was a little bit of a reach, but he’s a good prospect at a need area. Still, I don’t see a lot of impact from him. Solid play, yes, but not impact. (Think Ty Warren, not Richard Seymour.) Jackson and second-rounder Alex Magee should fill DE spots in the Chiefs’ new 3-4. Fourth-round CB Donald Washington could be a steal, and he’s certainly the Chiefs’ best second-day prospect. Trading for Matt Cassel was the right move for K.C., but that deal thinned out this draft class significantly. So these players will help, but the Chiefs are so talent-starved that they still need more.

3 – Raiders – Everyone is pounding the Raiders’ draft, but there are a couple of teams I thought did less with more picks. First-rounder Darrius Heyward-Bey is a huge talent, and while he would have been on the board at 17 and didn’t have to be taken seventh overall, he’s at least a legitimate first-rounder. Fourth-round WR Louis Murphy is a sleeper who could team with Heyward-Bey to revitalize the Raiders’ receiving corps – and that’s necessary. Picking three D-linemen should help. Plus, the Raiders get a brownie point from me for drafting defensive linemen named Slade (Norris) and Stryker (Sulak).

3 (con’t) – Chargers – I don’t love first-round pick Larry English, a small DE who will have to move to outside ‘backer, but I can see why the Chargers made that pick given Shawne Merriman’s contract and injury situation. But why not Robert Ayers instead of English? The lack of a second-round pick (which they dealt during last year’s draft) really hurts the depth of this class. Canadian DT Vaughn Martin is an interesting prospect to watch.

3 (con’t) – Panthers – The Panthers have been traditionally one of the league’s best drafting teams, but they’re in a dangerous Boolean thread of trading next year’s first-rounder for a current pick. It worked out OK last year, because Jeff Otah played well and the pick was 28th overall. But Everette Brown, whom they picked in the second round, isn’t a dominant player like Otah is. Brown is a good defensive end, but ideally he would play across from Julius Peppers instead of trying to replace him. Beyond that, DT Corvey Irvin fills a need but was a bit of a reach, and RB Mike Goodson doesn’t seem to fill a huge need. Sixth-round OG Duke Robinson has character questions, but in the sixth round you’re not finding a better talent. Given the losses Carolina had on their line, Robinson will be an important backup right away. The Panthers will get some players out of this draft, but it’s not up to their usual standards.

2 – Broncos – I fundamentally disagree with the Broncos’ approach in this draft. They needed defensive help, especially in the front 7, yet DE/OLB Robert Ayers was the only pick in that area. He’s a good fit, but what about defensive tackle (which was completely overlooked)? RB Knowshon Moreno was a luxury pick for a team with a lot of necessities. He’ll be a good pro, but he’s not taking this team from 8-8 to 10-6, much less any further. Alphonso Smith is a good corner, but he won’t replace Champ Bailey because of his height. The Broncos need Smith, Darnell McBath, and David Bruton to stabilize the secondary, but only Smith is a core player there. I do like fifth-round WR Kenny McKinley as a sleeper. There’s talent in this class, but on the whole this draft just didn’t make sense for a team that should be remaking its post-Jay Cutler identity. (Read the first thoughts post for what I think this class says about Josh McDaniels.)

2 (con’t) – Cowboys – Like the Bears, Dallas didn’t have any first-day picks, but in Dallas’ case my eyes didn’t pop at the picks they did have. It didn’t help that their first pick, OLB Jason Williams, felt like a reach. I’d be surprised if there’s more than one or two starters in this group. They did draft the most interesting kicker in David Buehler, who absolutely tore it up at the combine.

2 (con’t) – Buccaneers – I’m not a Josh Freeman believer, but the Bucs are. I won’t pound them for dealing  a sixth-round pick to move up two spots to get him. But given the massive overhaul the Bucs are doing on defense, they could have used more help on that side. We’ll see if Roy Miller or Kyle Moore contribute on the defensive line. Watch seventh-round WR Sammie Stroughter as a potential sleeper. The bottom line is that this draft class will rise and fall with Freeman, and because I think he’ll fall, the Bucs fall to the bottom of this comparison.

1 – Browns – Simply put, the Browns didn’t get enough value for the fifth overall pick, and it seemed like they were scared to pick in the first round. The guy they ended up with, C Alex Mack, should start, but how much of an impact can he have at that position? For a team that needs a lot of help, Mack doesn’t provide it. The Browns gave up on top-5 talent too easily because they didn’t want to pay financially, and that will end up costing them in the long run. Then to make things worse, I thought WR Brian Robeskie was a reach at the top of the second round. Only the picks of WR Mohammed Massaquoi and LB Kaluka Maiava keep this class from being a total failure.

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