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RP: The Quarterback Dead Zone

There’s not much real NFL news out there as the lockout continues, but that hasn’t stopped the rumors from floating around. Kevin Kolb remains a hot prospect for several teams at quarterback, while rumors are that the Redskins are prepared to go with John Beck as their starting quarterback.

Since both Kolb and Beck are former second-round picks, I was curious to dig back through drafts of past years to see how such picks have done in the NFL. The results of this research project were startling, and they revealed that both the second and the third rounds of the NFL draft have become the quarterback dead zone.

Can John Beck escape the QB dead zone in his 3rd NFL stop? Photo via bleacherreport.com

Only 14 percent of quarterbacks (5-of-35) taken in the second and third rounds since 1997 have been successes – and that’s if you grade generously and count Kolb as a success. And if you start grading after the first third of the second round, the success rate plummets even more to 7 percent (2-of-29).

Let’s look back at the drafts to see how these failures have happened. Our guess is that you’ll look at this list and marvel at just how poorly teams have done drafting quarterbacks in the dead zone. And after the list, we’ll make some conclusions.

Pat White, just another victim of the QB dead zone, via nydailynews.com

FYI, Quarterbacks who we’re grading as successes are in all caps below. We went back through the 1997 draft, since there’s only one QB left in the league who entered before then (Kerry Collins, 1995).

Second round

2011 – Andy Dalton (CIN, 35); Colin Kaepernick (SF, 36)

2010 – Jimmy Clausen (CAR, 48)

2009 – Pat White (MIA, 44)

2008 – Brian Brohm (GB, 56); Chad Henne (MIA, 57)

2007 – KEVIN KOLB (PHI, 36); John Beck (MIA, 40); Drew Stanton (DET, 43)

2006 – Kellen Clemens (NYJ, 49); Tarvaris Jackson (MINN, 64)

2001 – DREW BREES (SD, 32); Quincy Carter (DALL, 53); Marques Tuiasosopo (OAK, 59)

1999 – Shaun King (TB, 50)

1998 – Charlie Batch (DET, 60)

1997 – JAKE PLUMMER (ARIZ, 42)

Third Round

2011 – Ryan Mallett (NE, 74)

2010 – Colt McCoy (CLE, 85)

2008 – Kevin O’Connell (NE, 94)

2007 – Trent Edwards (BUFF, 92)

2006 – Charlie Whitehurst (SD, 81); Brodie Croyle (KC, 85)

2005 – Charlie Frye (CLE, 67); Andrew Walter (OAK, 69); David Greene (SEA, 85)

2004 – MATT SCHAUB (ATL, 90)

2003 – Dave Ragone (HOU, 88); Chris Simms (TB, 97)

2002 – Josh McCown (ARIZ, 81)

2000 – Giovanni Carmazzi (SF, 65); Chris Redman (BALT, 75)

1999 – Brock Huard (SEA, 77)

1998 – Jonathan Quinn (JAX, 86); BRIAN GRIESE (DEN, 91)

Conclusions

History tells us that to have any chance of success with a second-round quarterback, you have to take him in the first 10 picks of the round. That’s what the Bengals did with Andy Dalton and the 49ers did with Colin Kaepernick this year. But after the first 10 picks of the round, the chances of success plummet and stay low through the third round.

And we discussed last year how trading into the back end of the first round for a quarterback is a strategy that fails. In other words, it seems like the best chance for success with a quarterback isn’t just taking one early – it’s taking one in the first 15-to-20 picks. Spending a second- or third-round pick is an even worse risk than the 50/50 shot a first-round QB is.

Meanwhile, lower-round quarterbacks – Kyle Orton, Matt Cassel, Ryan Fitzpatrick, David Garrard, Matt Hasselbeck, and of course Tom Brady – have had more success than the QBs taken in the dead zone of the second and third rounds. While it’s been a few years since a late-round or undrafted QB has rocketed to stardom, finding a QB that way is ironically a better bet than taking one in the second or third round.

All this history points does not bode well for recent draftees like Jimmy Clausen (who appears headed down the traditional second-round path) and Colt McCoy (who has shown a bit more promise). And it makes us wonder whether the Patriots’ 2011 gamble on Ryan Mallett will end up like their selection of Kevin O’Connell three years before.

We’ll see if Dalton, Kaepernick, Mallett, or any other young quarterbacks can escape the trend. But for now, we have no choice but to believe in the force of the QB dead zone.

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Fantasy Football Applaud or a Fraud Week 3

Which fantasy football standouts from Week 3 do you need to trust, and which performances should you write off as unpredictable flukes? Each week we answer these questions by going through these performances and deciding whether to applaud or whether it’s a fraud. As always, with each verdict, we’ll give context for what it means.

Roy Williams breaks free for a 63-yard TD reception. Associated Press via espn.comQuarterbacks

Matt Cassel, Chiefs – After throwing for just 244 yards and one touchdown in the first two games of the year, Cassel led the charge as the Chiefs moved to 3-0 by throwing for 250 yards and three scores. That’s a nice game, but relying on Cassel to produce every week just isn’t wise. Even with bye weeks coming, there are other options who are better bets for your fantasy lineup than Cassel is. Verdict: A fraud

Joe Flacco, Ravens – Flacco had thrown for just one touchdown in the first two games, but he connected with Anquan Boldin for three touchdowns against the Browns in Week 3. That offensive explosion is a reminder that Flacco has a good arm and good weapons and should be a consideration for a top-12 quarterback spot. With bye weeks coming, Flacco will be a premium fill-in option in 10-team leagues. Don’t be afraid to put him in your starting lineup. Verdict: Applaud

Kyle Orton, Broncos – We discussed Orton in our Colts/Broncos post. Verdict: Applaud

Running backs

Kenneth Darby, Rams – After Steven Jackson was injured, Darby stepped in with 49 yards and a touchdown. His yards-per-carry average wasn’t great, but Darby showed enough pop that he’s worth a claim as insurance vs. Jackson’s injury or as a potential bye-week fill-in if Jackson can’t play. Verdict: Applaud

BenJarvus Green-Ellis, Patriots – With Laurence Maroney traded, Kevin Faulk on injured reserve, and Fred Taylor injured during the Patriots’ win over the Bills, Green-Ellis stepped up with 98 rushing yards and a touchdown. Danny Woodhead also had a rushing TD for the Pats, but if Taylor’s out long term, Green-Ellis (aka the Law Firm) becomes a nice fantasy option who can fit in a flex spot in 12-team leagues. Verdict: Applaud

Peyton Hillis, Browns – Hillis not only scored for the third game in a row; he also piled up 144 rushing yards with Jerome Harrison out. Hillis, not Harrison, is the running back you want out of Cleveland, and at this point Hillis is a top-30 back who’s good enough to start as a flex in 10-team leagues. Verdict: Applaud

Thomas Jones, Chiefs – Jones isn’t nearly as flashy as teammate Jamaal Charles, and he won’t pile up nearly as many yards as Charles does. But Jones had 95 yards and a score against the 49ers, following an 83-yard effort in Week 2. Jones deserves consideration as a bye-week fill-in. He doesn’t have massive upside, but he should be good for 70 yards or more most weeks, which is nice in a spot-start situation. Verdict: Applaud

C.J. Spiller, Bills – Spiller only had 39 yards from scrimmage against the Pats, but the rookie from Clemson scored twice, on a short reception and on a kickoff return. That kind of explosiveness is what makes Spiller so appealing for fantasy owners. Spiller won’t be consistent, however, which means that he’s a boom-or-bust play in your starting lineup. Most of the time, the bust will be too damaging to your chances of winning, which means you can’t start Spiller no matter how appealing it may seem. Verdict: A fraud

Beanie Wells, Cardinals – In his return from injury, Wells ran for 75 yards on 14 carries. Those aren’t eye-popping fantasy numbers, but it’s a good first game for a guy we believe can be a solid fantasy starter. Verdict: Applaud

Wide receivers

Austin Collie, Colts – We discussed Collie in our Colts/Broncos postVerdict: Applaud

Jabar Gaffney and Brandon Lloyd, Broncos – We discussed Gaffney and Lloyd in our Colts/Broncos post. Verdict: Applaud for Gaffney; A fraud for Lloyd

Jeremy Maclin, Eagles – Maclin had four catches for 83 yards and two scores against the Jaguars, and he now has four TD catches this season. At this point, he’s a must-start. Verdict: Applaud

Lance Moore, Saints – Two weeks ago, we mentioned that Moore is back to having a role in the Saints offense, and Moore proved that to be true with a 149-yard, two-TD performance against the Falcons. At this point, Moore is the second-most valuable fantasy receiver in New Orleans behind Marques Colston, and Moore’s return means that Robert Meachem has little chance of repeating his solid 2009 fantasy season. Moore’s worth a pick-up if you can get him. Verdict: Applaud

Mike Wallace, Steelers – Wallace had just 87 receiving yards in the first two games combined, and it appeared that the Steelers’ lackluster QB situation would limit his breakout potential. But Charlie Batch was able to hit Wallace for two touchdowns against Tampa Bay, as Wallace piled up 100 receiving yards. Wallace is going to be a starting-caliber fantasy receiver for Pittsburgh as soon as Ben Roethlisberger returns in Week 6, but we don’t recommend starting him against Baltimore next week. Call this delayed applause for a good young player. Verdict: Applaud

Roy Williams, Cowboys – Williams has been a big disappointment since he landed in Dallas, and the first two weeks of this season are no exception. But Williams (pictured above) exploded for 117 yards and two touchdowns against the Texans. We don’t buy this kind of output from Williams consistently, because he remains below Miles Austin and Dez Bryant in the pecking order. Maybe Williams is worth a waiver claim, but we can’t imagine a scenario in which Williams is worth starting anytime soon. Verdict: A fraud

Tight ends

Kevin Boss, Giants – Boss returned from a Week 1 concussion with 88 receiving yards against the Titans. It’s a reminder that Boss is a decent fill-in option at tight end during a bye week. For that status, we’ll give some mild applause. Verdict: Applaud

Tony Scheffler, Lions – Last week, Brandon Pettigrew had a big receiving week for the Lions. This week, Scheffler posted 60 receiving yards and a touchdown. Both tight ends will have their moments, but predicting which will produce when is so unlikely that neither is worth a fantasy start. Verdict: A fraud

Jeremy Shockey, Saints – We’ve been shocked in the Saints games we’ve watched thus far how often Shockey has been targeted. Against the Falcons in Week 3, he finished with eight catches for 78 yards and a score. After two three-catch games to start the season, Shockey showed this week that he’s worth consideration as a fill-in starter when your team’s tight end goes on bye. Verdict: Applaud

8-78-1

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Rise/Sink/Float Week 3

Each week, we preview teams that are moving up and moving down in our weekly Football Relativity comparison. We’ll analyze all 32 teams on Tuesday.

Rise – Pittsburgh Steelers – The Steelers went to 3-0 with a dominating 38-13 victory at previously undefeated Tampa Bay. The Steelers not only had an outstanding defensive performance that included a Brett Keisel touchdown; they also got three TD passes out of Charlie Batch (two to Mike Wallace, pictured). The Steelers are playing inspired football thus far, and once Ben Roethlisberger returns, Steel City may well have the most complete team in the league.

Sink – New York Giants – After a season-opening win, the Giants have lost two games in which they were not close. Losing at Indy in Week 2 is no shame, but getting crushed 29-10 in a home game against the Titans doesn’t bode well. The Giants couldn’t stop Chris Johnson, and they turned the ball over three times as well. It’s not a good start for a Giants team that hoped for much more after a terrible finish last year.

Float – New Orleans Saints – The Saints lost a home game to the Falcons, but we believe the result says more about about the Falcons’ prowess than about the Saints’ failings. Drew Brees threw a couple of interceptions, but he also rallied the offense for a game-tying field goal at the end of regulation. And the Saints’ defense got a key stop in overtime, only to see it wasted when Garrett Hartley missed a field goal that would have won the game. So we’re leaving the Saints at the top level of our comparison until we see more compelling evidence that they’re falling apart.

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Football Relativity: QB quandaries

After a training-camp season full of quarterback stability (only Arizona made an in-camp change), a whopping eight teams ran into quarterback issues by Week Two. Below, we compare the significance of these quarterback issues, given how close teams are to contending and how good the quarterback options are. We’ll do this using Football Relativity, with the 10 level noting the most pressing QB quandary and the 1 level marking one that doesn’t change a team’s fortunes at all.

10 – Philadelphia Eagles (Kevin Kolb or Michael Vick) – Kolb missed Week 2 due to the after-effects of a concussion, and Vick had a big game against the Lions. Vick has completed 64 percent of his passes and thrown for three TDs without an interception, and he has run for 140 yards. He looks revitalized after a disappointing return to the NFL in 2009. At first, the Eagles said they’re sticking with Kolb, who became the franchise quarterback when Philly traded Donovan McNabb. But then the Eagles reversed field (a Vick-ian maneuver) and named Vick the starter not just for Week 3 but going forward. It’s shocking that the Eagles pulled the plug on Kolb after just one half on the field, but Vick’s solid performance won the day. The question is what happens if Vick’s two good games turn into inconsistent play. Philly is a talented team, but unless Vick really is back, the way they’ve handled their QB situation could end up scuttling the season.

9 – none

8 – Tennessee Titans (Vince Young vs. Kerry Collins) – After three turnovers, Vince Young was yanked out of the Titans’ loss to the Steelers, and Collins came in to lead Tennessee’s only TD-scoring drive. Of course, Collins also had two turnovers as well. Jeff Fisher has said there’s no question that Young is the starter, but Collins is a capable quarterback who proved in 2008 he can step in for Young and lead the Titans to the playoffs. (Of course, in 2009 Young replaced Collins and led the Titans from an 0-6 start to an 8-8 finish.) So Young needs to perform well in the next couple of games, or else the clamor for Collins will really pick up.

7 – none

6 – Carolina Panthers (Matt Moore vs. Jimmy Clausen) – The Panthers are making the switch from Moore, the December superstar in ’07 and ’09, to the rookie Clausen after Moore turned the ball over six times and failed to generate much offense in his first two starts. Clausen is polished for a rookie, but he’s still just a rookie who will make mistakes. Given the talent Carolina has elsewhere on the field, quarterback play that rises from putrid to mediocre could help, but the question is whether Clausen is wily enough at this point to be even that small of an upgrade over Moore.

5 – Arizona Cardinals (Derek Anderson vs. Max Hall) – The Cardinals opted for Anderson, a scattershot quarterback with a big arm, over the cautious check-down man Matt Leinart in training camp, but Anderson’s inconsistency has outweighed his potential thus far. Hall, a rookie out of BYU, lurks as a potential replacement. Hall is more of a quick-hitting trigger man who doesn’t have the big arm but might be better equipped to get the ball to Arizona’s strong stable of receiving targets. So if Anderson struggles and the Cards start to fall behind in the lowly NFC West, Hall will get a shot.

4 – Oakland Raiders (Bruce Gradkowski vs. Jason Campbell) – The Raiders brought in Campbell to bring stability to the QB position in place of JaMarcus Russell, but Campbell lasted six quarters until he was benched. Campbell has talent, but he makes enough mistakes to offset his ability to throw the ball downfield. Gradkowski is a Jeff Garcia-type of scrapper who doesn’t have a big arm but does find ways to move a team. The question is whether Gradkowski would be exposed if he played 3-4 games in a row. But for now, the Raiders should try to keep the spark Gradkowski lit last week aflame.

3 – Pittsburgh Steelers (Charlie Batch vs. Byron Leftwich) – Dennis Dixon won the Steelers’ September starting job in training camp, but he suffered a torn meniscus against Tennessee that will sideline him at least until Ben Roethlisberger returns. So now Pittsburgh must choose between Batch, the ultimate placeholder, and Leftwich, who had some good games for Pittsburgh back in 2008 but looked awful for the Bucs last year. Leftwich may have a little more upside, but he’s got such a slow delivery at this point that Batch might actually be less of a liability. But the bottom line is that the Steelers will win the next two games because of defense, not Batch or Leftwich, and so in the end it really doesn’t matter much which guy starts.

2 – Jacksonville Jaguars (David Garrard vs. Todd Bouman) – Garrard threw four picks against the Chargers and was replaced by Luke McCown, but McCown blew out his knee at the end of the game and will miss the rest of the season. Jacksonville brought back Bouman to be Garrard’s backup, but the injury means there’s no question that Garrard is the guy.

1 – Buffalo Bills (Ryan Fitzpatrick vs. Trent Edwards) – The Bills made the switch from Edwards to Fitzpatrick, but both quarterbacks have frankly proved that they’re not good enough to be regulars on the NFL level. No matter who plays, the Bills are among the league’s worst teams in terms of QB play, and they have few hopes of winning.

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Steelers/Titans thoughts

Troy Polamalu makes an interception in the end zone against the Titans. AP/espn.com

Each week, we watch a specific game and share what we learned. This week we tuned into the Steelers/Titans clash in Nashville, which the Steelers won 19-11. It was a huge win for the Steelers, who move to 2-0 and assure themselves of a solid start in the absence of QB Ben Roethlisberger. When Big Ben returns, the Steelers will add a passing dimension to their game that they’ve been without thus far, and that will take them from a good team to a true contender.

Here’s what else we saw from both an on-field perspective and a fantasy football perspective.

On-Field Perspective
*The Steelers got off to a quick start with some shenanigans, using a reverse to spring Antonio Brown free for an 89-yard touchdown return of the game’s opening kickoff. Given the fact that Pittsburgh didn’t score a touchdown in regulation last week, and given the fact that the Dennis Dixon/Charlie Batch combo wasn’t going to score a ton, it was a calculated gamble that paid off big for Pittsburgh.
*Vince Young responded poorly to the intense pressure the Steelers put on him, turning the ball over three times (two picks and a fumble), and because of the turnovers the Titans yanked him from the game in favor of Kerry Collins. Collins’ lack of mobility made him a sitting duck for the Steelers, and he threw an interception and fumbled on his first two series, but you can’t blame Titans head coach Jeff Fisher for looking for a spark. Collins rewarded Fisher’s faith with some sharp passing in the last-ditch comeback effort the Titans mounted late in the fourth quarter.
*Batch, who entered the game when Dixon suffered a knee injury, is a caretaker but nothing more. Still, we prefer him to Byron Leftwich, who has a slower delivery and is more likely to make a crucial mistake. Leftwich was cut before the game but is expected to be re-signed after it.
*The Steelers’ defense is still a scary unit, and the presence of Troy Polamalu takes it to another dimension. Polamalu had an end-zone interception that snuffed out a Tennessee scoring chance. It was one of a whopping seven turnovers the Steelers caused. Pittsburgh also created a ton of pressure up front, as James Harrison, Lamarr Woodley, and company were all over Young and Collins. Even more impressively, they kept RB Chris Johnson from breaking out, snapping his string of 12 straight 100-yard games.
*The Titans’ defensive line doesn’t get the credit that the Steelers’ does, but it is a solid unit that created pressure and did a nice job bottling up Rashard Mendenhall. Despite the Steelers’ banged-up offensive line that struggles over and over again, that’s still a credit to the Titans.
*Rob Bironas’ crazy middle on-side kick in the fourth quarter put him in the lead for crazy kicker of the week honors – even if it looked like it was drawn up by the Little Rascals, as Eric Stangel tweeted.
*Kevin Harlan, the CBS play-by-play man, is more detailed than anyone else on the national scene. At the same time, he communicates big moments both clearly and with excitement. He’s perhaps our favorite play-by-play guy on the national scene, and it was good to hear him in this one.

Fantasy Football Perspective
*We’re believers in both Hines Ward and Mike Wallace of the Steelers, but Dixon’s injury killed their value this week. Batch simply isn’t good enough at this advanced age to get them the ball. Fantasy owners have just two more games before Ben Roethlisberger returns, which will help both wideouts, but for now Ward and Wallace aren’t guys you can rely on comfortably.
*We don’t love Mendenhall as a No. 1 fantasy back, and this game showed why. Against a solid defense, he doesn’t have the breakaway speed to enhance his numbers. He ended this game with just 69 yards and a 3.0-yard-per-carry average. Plus, if Isaac Redmond gets goal-line carries (as he did late in the fourth quarter), Mendenhall’s stock slips a bit more. Mendenhall is a good but not great back who is in a great situation, and that’s why he has solid fantasy value. But don’t expect the spectacular from him. He’s a No. 2 fantasy back, not a fantasy franchise player.
*Don’t freak out about Chris Johnson’s so-so game.  The Steelers’ defense is death on fantasy running backs, and the seven-turnover performance around him really hurt Johnson’s prospects in this game. It hurts to get just 34 yards from your No. 1 overall pick, but it’s not reason for concern at this point.
*Titans WR Nate Washington scored a touchdown for the second straight week, but given Tennessee’s uncertain QB situation, he’s still not a great investment for fantasy owners. Washington isn’t ownable except in the largest leagues.

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FR: March signings

As we continue our coverage of free agency, we’ll compare signings from March using Football Relativity. This post includes signings beginning March 11; for signings from the first week of free agency, check out this elongated post.

10 – Jets (added RB LaDainian Tomlinson, S Brodney Pool, and LB Lance Laury; kept FB Tony Richardson) – Tomlinson had a great career in San Diego, but he showed serious signs of slowing down in recent years, with his yards-per-carry average dropping to 3.3 in ’09. So the Chargers eventually had little choice but to release him and move on. With the Jets, Tomlinson should know that he’s taking a subservient role to emerging youngster Shonn Greene, and with Leon Washington returning from an ACL injury, Tomlinson could find carries hard to come by. The positive of that is that Tomlinson will stay fresher, but he’ll have to show a little more patience than he did in San Diego. If Tomlinson knows what he’s signing up for and is willing to be a 10-touch-a-game back, he could help because he provides more contrast to Greene than the departed Thomas Jones would have given. If not, Tomlinson will fade away in a strange-looking uniform, and the two-year, $5.1 million deal the Jets gave him will be wasted. Unfortunately, our hunch points toward the latter scenario. Meanwhile, Pool is a promising player who wasn’t tendered as a restricted free agent in Cleveland. He’ll get $1.3 million in a one-year deal with the Jets, where he’ll have a chance to replace the traded Kerry Rhodes in the starting lineup. Richardson is a solid blocking fullback who knows his role and plays it well. Laury, who was not tendered by the Seahawks, is a backup linebacker and special-teams ace.

10 (con’t) – Cardinals (added OLB Joey Porter, QB Derek Anderson, UFA OG Rex Hadnot and UFA LB Paris Lenon; kept UFA OT Jeremy Bridges, UFA LB Monty Biesel, and C Ben Claxton) – Porter, who was released by the Dolphins, is still a quality pass rusher who can make an impact in a  3-4 defense. At age 33, Porter has a lot of miles on his tires, but with 26.5 sacks in the last two years he hasn’t shown signs of major slippage. He helps to replace Bertrand Berry, who said he is retiring, for an Arizona defense that needs playmakers badly after losing Karlos Dansby and Antrel Rolle in the offseason. Porter isn’t the athlete the departed are, but he can help. While $17.5 million over three years (with a potential $7 million more in incentives) seems rich for a 33-year-old, Arizona was in a spot where it needed a defensive jolt. Porter can still provide that. Anderson, who had one good year out of four in Cleveland, got a two-year, $7.25 million contract in Arizona to back up or even challenge Matt Leinart. Anderson is not consistent, but he has a strong arm, and he’s fearless enought to go for the big play. That has too often led to interceptions, but in the run-first, big-play offense Arizona is moving toward, he could actually be a fit. The fact that Arizona has such a talented corps of receivers makes Anderson a better chance. At the least, he’ll challenge Leinart and force the former first-rounder to step up in order to seize the starting job, and if Anderson does that he’ll be worth the freight the Cards are paying. Hadnot got a three-year, $9 million deal to move over from Cleveland. He’s a physical guard who can also play center and figures to become a starter for Arizona. Bridges, who started several games last year, is a talented tackle who has gotten into trouble off the field. Lenon started for the Rams last year and now moves over to provide a veteran to help fill the gaping hole left by Karlos Dansby. Biesel provides depth but will help more on special teams.

9 – none

8 – Bills (added UFA DE Dwan Edwards and ILB Andra Davis; kept UFA TE Joe Klopfenstein) – As they move to a 3-4 defense, the Bills brought in reinforcements. Davis had a pretty good year as an inside ‘backer for Denver last year and was a nice addition on a two-year deal. Edwards, who got a four-year, $18 million deal to move over from the Ravens, is a sturdy end who can shine in the 3-4. Both are quality additions for a team that desperately needs them.

7 – Browns (added UFA TE Benjamin Watson and QB Jake Delhomme; kept UFA OL Billy Yates) – Watson was an inconsistent talent in New England, but he had some production, and he’s a better tight end than what the Browns had. Tight end is a crucial receiver in the West Coast offense, which is what Cleveland is moving toward, and so making an addition at that position is sensible. Watson got a three-year deal worth $12 million with $6.35 million guaranteed. Delhomme got $7 million over two years while still getting $19 million guaranteed from the Panthers deal he was released from. Delhomme is a terrific locker-room leader, and he has shown a knack for performing well under pressure earlier in his career. But his interception and fumble problems have been stark since his meltdown in a playoff game against Arizona in the 2008 season, and at this point it’s hard to see him breaking that year-long trend soon. Still, Delhomme may be a better answer than Seneca Wallace, who doesn’t have the pedigree of performance Delhomme has over his career. The Browns are getting a little bit of a discount on Delhomme because of his sweetheart Carolina deal, and at those numbers he’s worth a shot. We just don’t expect that shot to come in. Yates is a backup lineman who helps add depth now that Rex Hadnot and Hank Fraley are gone.

6 – Redskins (added UFA RB Larry Johnson, UFA QB Rex Grossman, P Josh Bidwill, and CB Philip Buchanon) – Johnson was released in Kansas City midseason last year as his production waned and his complaints persisted.  Johnson landed in Cincinnati as a backup to Cedric Benson, and he looked a little better, averaging 4.4 yards per carry in Cincy versus 2.9 in K.C. Now Johnson moves to Washington, where he will either work with Clinton Portis or replace him, depending on what the ‘Skins decide to do with their incumbent veteran back. Since Portis’ contract is basically guaranteed, we figure he’ll be back. That’s just as well, because Johnson is no longer a starting-caliber NFL back. He’s better in the role he had in Cincinnati at the end of last year, and spot duty will allow him to keep the limited pop he has left in his legs. The three-year, $3.5 million deal Johnson got indicates that’s the role he’ll have – but the potential of making up to $12 million in incentives indicates that more malcontent behavior could be in the offing if Johnson doesn’t get the ball as much as he wants. Grossman, a former Bears starter, was solid as a Texans backup last year and now moves with ex-Houston offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan to Washington. Chances are that Grossman, who got a one-year deal, will back up Jason Campbell. Bidwill was released by the Buccaneers in a cost-saving move after missing the ’09 season, but if healthy he is solid. Incumbent Hunter the Punter Smith is a free-agent, so the Redskins need a fallback option. Buchanon got a one-year, $1.5 million deal to provide help at corner. Buchanon’s a marginal starter but he’s worth that price for depth purposes if nothing else.

5 – none

4 – Chiefs (added OG Ryan Lilja; kept C Casey Wiegmann) – Wiegmann made a Pro Bowl with the Chiefs two years ago and now returns after being cut earlier this offseason. His veteran wiles help a young offensive line. Lilja, who started for the Colts over the past few years before being released this offseason, got a three-year, $7.5 million deal to come to K.C. and help to stabilize the offensive line as well. He’s not an elite guard, but Lilja will be a big upgrade for a Chiefs team that needs solid starters up front.

3 – Packers (kept UFA OT Mark Tauscher, franchise NT Ryan Pickett, and RFA S Nick Collins; added P Chris Bryan) – The Packers rarely get too involved in the free-agent market, instead preferring to develop through the draft. So it’s no surprise that their big strategy has been to re-sign their players. Tauscher, who the Packers brought back at midseason last year to help a horrible offensive line, got a two-year deal to remain at right tackle. He’s a veteran who provides stability until T.J. Lang is ready to seize a starting job. Pickett, the Pack’s franchise player, went from a $7 million tender to a four-year, $28 million deal. He’s done a great job for the Pack after bombing as a first-rounder in St. Louis, and he became even more valuable when he moved to the nose when Green Bay implemented the 3-4 defense last year. Collins, who had been angling for a new contract for two years, got a four-year, $23.4 million deal. He’s a playmaking safety who really adds to the Packers’ defense. Bryan is an Australian Rules Football player whom the Pack hopes can become a solid NFL punter a la Sav Rocca, Mat McBriar, or Darren Bennett. That strategy has actually been pretty successful for NFL teams.

3 (con’t) – Rams (added C Hank Fraley, CB Kevin Dockery, and TE Darcy Johnson; kept LS Chris Massey) – Fraley, who was released by the Browns, isn’t physically gifted, but he’s a rugged center who can help an offensive line that really struggled last year. Dockery and Johnson are former Giants who know now-Rams head coach Steve Spagnuolo from days in the Meadowlands. Neither is more than a role player, but they could help a roster bereft of talent. Massey got a four-year deal for being a dependable long snapper.

3 (con’t) – Steelers (added UFA ILB Larry Foote; kept UFA QB Charlie Batch) – Foote was a long-time Steeler who was cut before last season and went to Detroit, where he played well. Now he returns to Pittsburgh on a decent deal that’s worth $3.9 million in year one and potentially worth $9.3 million over three years. He should return to the starting lineup for Pittsburgh. Batch provides stability at quarterback, which is vital given Ben Roethlisberger’s legal problems and Dennis Dixon’s inexperience.

2 – Titans (kept UFA CB Rod Hood; added UFA DE Jason Babin and CB Tye Hill) – Hood started for the Cardinals in the Super Bowl two years ago and then went on an odyssey through Cleveland and Chicago before he found a home in Tennessee at midseason. The Titans brought him back because he fit their defense and can provide depth at a position that has been troublesome for them. Babin was an unrestricted free agent who had given the Eagles right to match any contract offer he got, but Philly opted to let Babin leave on a one-year, $1 million deal. Babin has never realized his potential as a first-round pass-rusher, but Tennessee’s defensive line coach Jim Washburn is one of the best, which makes taking a shot on a talented player reasonable, especially at the price Tennessee is paying. Hill, a bust with the Rams, never found a role with the Falcons last year and was released. But he’s fast, and given the Titans’ struggles last year in the secondary he’s worth a shot to see if he can help.

2 (con’t) – Chargers (added CBs Donald Strickland and Nathan Vasher; kept UFA DT Ian Scott) – Scott did a solid job as a fill-in starter at nose tackle for the Chargers last year, and he fits in as at least a backup this season. Strickland, who was released by the Jets, now gets a chance to replace Antonio Cromartie, who was traded to the Jets. Strickland isn’t great, but he’s good enough to be a third corner on a good team or maybe even a starter, so he’s a nice addition for the Bolts. Vasher hasn’t played well in recent years, in large part because of injury, but he performed admirably for Bolts defensive coordinator Ron Rivera back in Chicago, and that led to this chance in San Diego. Vasher, a cover-two specialist, got a two-year, $4.5 million deal

2 (con’t) – Patriots (added UFA TE Alge Crumpler) – After cutting Chris Baker and letting Ben Watson leave via free agency, the Patriots had no experience at tight end. They now have some in Crumpler, who proved in Tennessee that he is no longer the receiving threat he was in Atlanta. But Crumpler is big, and he’s a good blocker, which could make him a fit in the Patriots’ offense. New England should still look for a young tight end, but Crumpler will fit in at least some sets.

2 (con’t) – Dolphins (added C Richie Incognito) – Incognito is a talent who is tempermental on the field and off, and that act wore thin on the Rams, who cut him. But his talent, physical play, and aggressiveness merits a second chance if he can get with the program in Miami. He’s good enough to start if everything falls in line.

1 – Seahawks (added UFA TE Chris Baker, UFA WR Sean Morey, LB Matt McCoy, WR Ruvell Martin, and RB Quinton Ganther) – Baker is a versatile tight end who isn’t great but who fits well as a backup to John Carlson for the Seahawks. Baker got a two-year, $4.75 million deal. Morey is a special-teams dynamo who will make a big difference in that area moving over from Arizona. McCoy played for new Seahawks defensive coordinator Gus Bradley in Tampa Bay the last two seasons. Martin and Ganther were non-tendered as restricted free agents by the Rams and Redskins, respectively.

1 (con’t) – Buccaneers (added UFA S Sean Jones and LB Jon Alston; kept UFA LB Angelo Crowell and WR Mark Bradley) – Jones was once a great prospect for the Browns, but he left Cleveland and then spent one mediocre year in Philly. Jones has talent to help the Bucs at a problem position, but it remains to be seen whether he’ll actually live up to the promise. Still, he’s worth a look for a Bucs team that needs a ton of help. Alston was not tendered by the Raiders in the offseason despite starting eight games over the past two years. He adds depth to the Bucs’ linebacking corps. Crowell missed last season with an injury, but if he can return to his Buffalo form, he could help the Bucs. Bradley showed some potential in Kansas City, and that led the Bucs to bring him back even though he wasn’t tendered a restricted free-agent offer.

1 (con’t) – Vikings (kept UFA DT Jimmy Kennedy) – Kennedy, like Ryan Pickett a former Rams first-round bust, found a home as the third defensive tackle in Minnesota, and he opted for a two-year, $6 million contract to stay with the Vikings. He’s a key player for the Vikes who may be even more key if the StarCaps case goes against starting DTs Kevin and Pat Williams.

1 (con’t) – Panthers (kept UFA DE Tyler Brayton and OT Rob Pettiti; added CB Marcus Hudson) – Brayton, a former Raider first-round pick, became a sturdy run-stopping end for the Panthers, and they brought him back on a three-year deal to add experience to a defensive line that averaged 23.8 years of age before he was re-signed, according to Darin Gantt. Brayton doesn’t produce a huge pass rush, but he is a legitimate presence who keeps opponents from cheating in their blocking assignments. The Panthers didn’t tender Pettiti, whom they signed out of the UFL, as a restricted free agent, but they brought him back anyway. They signed Hudson, who was not tendered by the 49ers, to add depth at corner.

1 (con’t) – 49ers (added UFA CB Karl Paymah; kept UFA OT Barry Sims) – Sims is a good swing tackle who’s acceptable as a starter in a pinch, and that made him worth $2.1 million in 2010 to the Niners. Paymah is a fourth corner who can plug into the third spot in a pinch. He has good size, but his cover skills are spotty.

1 (con’t) – Bengals (kept UFA S Roy Williams; added WR Chris Davis) – Williams started for the Bengals last year before an injury sidelined him. He no longer has great range or coverage skills, but he’s still an asset against the run.

1 (con’t) – Colts (added OT Adam Terry) – The Colts, who added OG Andy Alleman previously, brought in Terry to continue the project of adding size to their offensive line. Terry, a five-year veteran who was not tendered a contract by the Ravens, missed the ’09 season with injury. He’s more of a third tackle who can fill in on both sides than a starting candidate, but he’ll help provide depth.

1 (con’t) – Eagles (added WRs Hank Baskett and Chad Hall) – Baskett (aka Mr. Kendra) comes back to Philly after a year in Indy marred by his gaffe on the onsides kick in the Super Bowl that proved devastating for the Colts. He’s a big receiver who won’t play much on offense but could help on special teams. Hall, a former Air Force player, is eligible to play now after completing his service requirement. He could end up being an under-the-radar prospect.

1 (con’t)- Lions (added LB Landon Johnson; kept DE Copeland Bryan and UFA S Marquand Manuel) – Manuel and Bryan (who was non-tendered as a restricted free agent) are depth players for Detroit. Johnson was released as a backup in Carolina, but he’s versatile and can provide depth at all three linebacker positions.

1 (con’t) – Bears (added CB Tim Jennings) – Jennings, a former second-round pick, never became a rotation corner in Indianapolis, and he wasn’t tendered a restricted-free-agent offer. But he could find a role as a third or fourth corner in the Bears’ cover-2 system, especially now that Nathan Vasher is out of Chicago.

1 (con’t) – Falcons (added S Matt Giordano) – Giordano was released by the Packers in the offseason, but he could find a home and a role with Atlanta, given the Falcons’ lack of depth in the secondary. Giordano is also an asset on special teams.

1 (con’t) – Saints (kept UFA LS Jason Kyle) – Kyle, a long-time Seahawk and Panther, got a Super Bowl ring as the Saints’ long-snapper last year. Now he gets a return engagement for another year. You don’t notice him, which is the ultimate compliment for a snapper.

1 (con’t) – Giants (added P Jy Bond) – Bond is another Australian Rules Football player trying to make the move to the NFL as a punter. He’s insurance in case the Giants can’t agree to a deal with long-time punter Jeff Feagles.

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The 2009 All-Jersey Number Team

Over the past few weeks, we’ve analyzed the best players in the league at each position by jersey number. Now we’re combining those lists to create our 2009 all jersey-number team. From 1 to 99, here are the best players at each jersey number.

To see how we selected our finalists, you can review the jersey number project with wide receivers in this post and then with tight ends in this postand quarterbacks in this post and running backs in this post and offensive linemen in this postand kickers/punters in this post and defensive linemen in this post and linebackers in this post and defensive backs in this post.

1 – PK Neil Rackers, Cardinals

2 – QB Matt Ryan, Falcons. Other position winner: P Dustin Colquitt, Chiefs

3 – PK Stephen Gostkowski, Patriots. Other position winner: QB Derek Anderson, Browns

4 – QB Brett Favre, Vikings. Other position winner: P Andy Lee, 49ers

5 – QB Donovan McNabb, Eagles. Other position winner: P Mike Scifres, Chargers

6 – QB Jay Cutler, Bears. Other position winner: PK Joe Nedney, 49ers

7 – QB Ben Roethlisberger, Steelers. Other position winner: P Jason Baker, Panthers

8 – QB Matt Schaub, Texans. We originally gave the position nod to Matt Hasselbeck, but as Hasselbeck continues a steep decline, we’re switching to an ascending player in Schaub. Other position winners: QB Matt Hasselbeck, Seahawks; PK Ryan Longwell, Vikings

9 – QB Drew Brees, Saints. Other position winner: P Shane Lechler, Raiders

10 – QB Eli Manning, Giants. Other position winners: WR Santonio Holmes, Steelers; PK Nate Kaeding, Chargers

11 – WR Larry Fitzgerald, Cardinals. Other position winners: PK Sebastian Janikowksi, Raiders; QB Daunte Culpepper, Lions

12 – QB Tom Brady, Patriots. Other position winner: WR Marques Colston, Saints

13- QB Kurt Warner, Cardinals. Other position winner: WR Johnny Knox, Bears

14 – WR Brandon Stokely, Broncos. Other position winner: QB Ryan Fitzpatrick, Bills

15 – WR Brandon Marshall, Broncos. Other position winners: QB Seneca Wallace, Seahawks; P Craig Hentrich, Titans

16 – WR/RS Josh Cribbs, Browns. Other position winner: QB Charlie Batch, Steelers

17 – QB Philip Rivers, Chargers. Other position winners: WR Braylon Edwards, Jets; PK Shayne Graham, Bengals

18 – QB Peyton Manning, Colts. Other position winners: WR Sidney Rice, Vikings; P Jeff Feagles, Giants

19 – WR Miles Austin, Cowboys

20 – S Ed Reed, Ravens. Other position winner: RB Thomas Jones, Jets

21 – CB Nnamdi Asomugha, Raiders. Other position winner: RB LaDanian Tomlinson, Chargers

22 – CB Asante Samuel, Eagles. Other position winner: RB Matt Forte, Bears

23 – RB Ronnie Brown, Dolphins. Other position winners: CB DeAngelo Hall, Redskins; WR Devin Hester, Bears

24 – CB Darrelle Revis, Jets. Other position winner: RB Marion Barber, Cowboys

25 – RB Ryan Grant, Packers. Other position winner: S Ryan Clark, Steelers

26 – CB Antoine Winfield, Vikings. Other position winner: RB Clinton Portis, Redskins

27 – RB Ray Rice, Ravens. Other position winner: CB Rashean Mathis, Jaguars

28 – RB Chris Johnson, Titans. Originally, we opted for Adrian Peterson over Johnson, but as Johnson continues his historic season, and as Peterson continues to struggle, we’re going to make a switch. Other positional winners: RB Adrian Peterson, Vikings; S Gibril Wilson, Dolphins

29 – CB Leon Hall, Bengals. Other position winner: RB Joseph Addai, Colts

30 – S Mike Brown, Chiefs. Other position winner: FB John Kuhn, Packers

31 – CB Cortland Finnegan, Titans. Other position winner: RB Jamal Lewis, Browns

32 – RB Maurice Jones-Drew, Jaguars. Other position winner: S Eric Weddle, Chargers

33 – RB Michael Turner, Falcons. Other position winner: CB Charles Tillman, Bears

34 – RB Ricky Williams, Dolphins. Other position winner: S Dominique Barber, Texans

35 – CB Zack Bowman, Bears. Other position winner: RB Jerome Harrison, Browns

36 – S Nick Collins, Packers. Other position winner: RB Brian Westbrook, Eagles

37 – S Yeremiah Bell, Dolphins. Other position winner: FB Jason McKie, Bears

38 – S Dashon Goldson, 49ers. Other position winner: RB Samkon Gado, Rams

39 – RB Steven Jackson, Rams. Other position winner: CB Brandon Carr, Chiefs

40 – TE Jim Kleinsasser, Vikings. Other position winners: RB Brian Leonard, Bengals; S Marquand Manuel, Lions

41 – S Antoine Bethea, Colts. Other position winners: FB Lorenzo Neal, Raiders; TE Spencer Havner, Packers

42 – S Darren Sharper, Saints. Other position winner: RB BenJarvus Green-Ellis, Patriots

43 – S Troy Polamalu, Steelers. Other position winner: RB Darren Sproles, Chargers

44 – TE Dallas Clark, Colts. Other position winners: RB Ahmad Bradshaw, Giants; S Jarrad Page, Chiefs

45 – FB Mike Sellers, Redskins. Other position winners: TE Leonard Pope, Chiefs; DB De’Von Hall, Colts

46 – RB Ladell Betts, Redskins. Other position winners: TE Daniel Fells, Rams; LB Vinny Ciurciu, Lions

47 – FB Lawrence Vickers, Browns. Other position winners: S Jon McGraw, Chiefs; LB Brit Miller, 49ers

48 – S Chris Horton, Redskins

49 – FB Tony Richardson, Jets. Other position winners: LB Zack Follett, Lions; DB Rashad Johnson, Cardinals

50 – LB Curtis Lofton, Falcons. Other position winner: OG Ben Hamilton, Broncos

51 – LB Barrett Ruud, Buccaneers. Other position winner: C Dominic Raiola, Lions

52 – LB Ray Lewis, Ravens

53 – LB Keith Bulluck, Titans

54 – OG Brian Waters, Chiefs. Other position winners: LB Andra Davis, Broncos; DE Quentin Groves, Jaguars

55 – OLB Terrell Suggs, Ravens. Other position winners: DE John Abraham, Falcons; C Alex Mack, Browns

56 – LB Brian Cushing, Texans

57 – LB Bart Scott, Jets. Other position winners: C Olin Kreutz, Bears; DE James Wyche, Jaguars

58 – DE Trent Cole, Eagles. Other position winner: LB Karlos Dansby, Cardinals

59 – LB London Fletcher, Redskins. Other position winner: OG Nick Cole, Eagles

60 – OT Chris Samuels, Redskins. Other position winner: DT Joe Cohen, Lions

61 – C Nick Hardwick, Chargers. Other position winner: DT Gerard Warren, Raiders

62 – C Casey Wiegmann, Broncos

63 – C Jeff Saturday, Colts

64 – C Jake Grove, Dolphins. Other position winner: DT Kedric Gholston, Redskins

65 – OG Andre Gurode, Cowboys

66 – OG Alan Faneca, Jets. Other position winner: DT DelJuan Robinson, Texans

67 – C Jamaal Jackson, Eagles

68 – C Kevin Mawae, Titans. Other position winner: DE Jonathan Fanene, Bengals

69 – DE Jared Allen, Vikings. Other position winner: OT Jordan Gross, Panthers

70 – OG Leonard Davis, Cowboys. Other position winner: DE Kendall Langford, Dolphins

71 – OT Michael Roos, Titans. Other position winner: DE Kroy Biermann, Falcons

72 – DE Osi Umenyiora, Giants. Other position winner: OT Vernon Carey, Dolphins

73 – OG Jahri Evans, Saints. Other position winner: DT Jimmy Kennedy, Vikings

74 – C Nick Mangold, Jets. Other position winners: OLB Aaron Kampman, Packers; NT Jacques Cesaire, Chargers

75 – NT Vince Wilfork, Patriots. Other position winner: OG Davin Joseph, Buccaneers

76 – OG Steve Hutchinson, Vikings. Other position winner: NT Jamal Williams, Chargers

77 – OT Jake Long, Dolphins. Other position winner: NT Kris Jenkins, Jets

78 – OT Ryan Clady, Broncos. Other position winner: DE Jacob Ford, Titans

79 – NT Ryan Pickett, Packers. Other position winner: OT Jeff Otah, Panthers

80 – WR Andre Johnson, Texans. Other position winner: TE Bo Scaife, Titans

81 – WR Randy Moss, Patriots. Other position winner: TE Owen Daniels, Texans

82 – TE Jason Witten, Cowboys. Other position winner: WR Dwayne Bowe, Chiefs

83 – WR Wes Welker, Patriots. Other position winner: TE Heath Miller, Steelers

84 – WR Roddy White, Falcons. Other position winner: TE Benjamin Watson, Patriots

85 – TE Antonio Gates, Chargers. Other position winner: WR Chad Ochocinco, Bengals

86 – WR Hines Ward, Steelers. Other position winner: TE Todd Heap, Ravens

87 – WR Reggie Wayne, Colts. Other position winner: TE Brent Celek, Eagles

88 – TE Tony Gonzalez, Falcons. Other position winner: WR Isaac Bruce

89 – WR Steve Smith, Panthers. Other position winner: TE Daniel Graham, Broncos

90 – DE Julius Peppers, Panthers

91 – DE Will Smith, Saints. Other position winner: OLB Tamba Hali, Chiefs

92 – OLB Elvis Dumervil, Broncos. Other position winner: DT Albert Haynesworth, Redskins

93 – DT Kevin Williams, Vikings. Other position winner: OLB Anthony Spencer, Cowboys

94 – OLB DeMarcus Ware, Cowboys. Other position winner: DE Aaron Schobel, Bills

95 – OLB Shaun Phillips, Chargers. Other position winner: DT Jonathan Babineaux, Falcons

96 – OLB David Bowens, Browns. Other position winner: DE Tyler Brayton, Panthers

97 – NT Kelly Gregg, Ravens. Other position winner: OLB Calvin Pace, Jets

98 – DE Robert Mathis, Colts. Other position winner: LB Brian Orakpo, Redskins

99 – OLB Jason Taylor, Dolphins. Other position winner: DE Andre Carter, Redskins

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