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Jersey Numbers: Punters and Kickers

Over the next several weeks, we’re going to look at several different positions (I can’t yet promise all) to identify the best players wearing each jersey number at each position. If this goes as planned, we’ll then compile a list of the best player wearing each jersey number in the league.

If you have quibbles, or want to add someone I forgot, leave a comment and we’ll update this post. And please have patience – this is a big job.

We started this project with wide receivers in this post and then with tight ends in this post and quarterbacks in this post and running backs in this post and offensive linemen in this post. Now we move to kickers and punters, who wear numbers between 1 and 19, although the vast majority sport single numbers.

1 – PK Neil Rackers, Cardinals – Rackers hasn’t shown off the big leg he featured earlier in his career, but he has developed into a consistent threat on field goals. He gets the nod over Dallas’ Mat McBriar, a supersolid punter. Other notable 1s: Pat McAfee, Colts; Matt Turk, Texans

2 – P Dustin Colquitt, Chiefs – He doesn’t get much credit, but Colquitt may be the NFL’s best punter not named Shane Lechler. With 31 punts inside the 20 vs. just four touchbacks, and with an incredibly low average return rate of just 5.2 yards, it’s no wonder that Colquitt is second in the NFL in net punting with a 41.9-yard average. We give him the nod over good placekickers like David Akers of Philly, Mason Crosby of Green Bay, and Rob Bironas of Tennessee. Other notable 2s: Brandon Fields, Dolphins; Nick Harris, Lions; Reggie Hodges, Browns

3 – PK Stephen Gostkowski, Patriots – Gostkowski has developed into a solid clutch field goal kicker as well as a strong kickoff specialist. It’s rare to find a single kicker who does both jobs so well. Other notable 3s: Kris Brown, Texans; Josh Brown, Rams; John Carney, Saints; Jeff Reed, Steelers; Jay Feely, Jets; Matt Stover, Colts; Adam Podlesh, Jaguars; Hunter Smith, Redskins; Matt Bryant, Falcons

4 – P Andy Lee, 49ers – Lee is another underrated punter with terrific averages both gross and net. He gets the nod over long-time placekickers Jason Hanson of Detroit, John Kasay of Carolina, and Adam Vinatieri of Indianapolis, who has missed much of the season. Other notable 4s: Sam Koch, Ravens; Brad Maynard, Bears; Phil Dawson, Browns

5 – P Mike Scifres, Chargers – Scifres’ numbers don’t completely reflect it, but he can be a game-changing punter, as he showed in San Diego’s playoff win over Indianapolis last season. Other notable 5s: Dan Carpenter, Dolphins; Garrett Hartley, Saints; Rhys Lloyd, Panthers; Matt Prater, Broncos; Ben Graham, Cardinals; Donnie Jones, Rams; Chris Kluwe, Vikings

6 – PK Joe Nedney, 49ers – There aren’t dominant kickers or punters at this number, so we’ll give the nod to Nedney, who has long been a solid kicker with a big leg. The fact that he’s about the funniest kicker I ever interviewed doesn’t hurt either. Other notable 6s: Nick Folk, Cowboys; Ryan Succop, Chiefs; Shaun Suisham, Redskins; Chris Hanson, Patriots; Brett Kern, Titans; Thomas Morstead, Saints; Sav Rocca, Eagles

7 – P Jason Baker, Panthers – Few kickers wear this number, so Baker, who isn’t having his best season but has been solid in his time in Carolina, gets the nod. Other notable 7s: Jeremy Kapinos, Packers; Billy Cundiff, Ravens

8 – PK Ryan Longwell, Vikings – Longwell has long been one of the NFL’s most reliable kickers, and he’s 18-for-19 on field goals this year, including 2-of-2 from 50-plus. That gives him a slight nod over Buffalo P Brian Moorman. Other notable 8: Dirk Johnson, Buccaneers

9 – P Shane Lechler, Raiders – Lechler is on his way to a record-setting season. As Bill Simmons pointed out on Friday, Lechler has a chance to break the single-season record of 51.4 yards per punt (held by Hall of Fame QB Slingin’ Sammy Baugh). Lechler is currently averaging 51.7, and his net average of 44.7 yards is nearly three yards better than the single-season record, which Lechler already holds. He’s the best punter in the league and might be the best punter ever. Other notable 9s: Josh Bidwell, Buccaneers; Michael Koenen, Falcons; Jon Ryan, Seahawks; Daniel Sepulveda, Steelers; Steven Weatherford, Jets; Robbie Gould, Bears; Rian Lindell, Bills; Lawrence Tynes, Giants

10 – PK Nate Kaeding, Chargers – Kaeding has had his playoff problems, but he’s been a reliable regular-season producer. That gives him the nod over Seattle’s Olindo Mare, who is having a good season but has been inconsistent in recent years. Other notable 10s: Connor Barth, Buccaneers; Josh Scobee, Jaguars; Kevin Huber, Bengals

11 – PK Sebastian Janikowski, Raiders – The kicker also known as Sea Bass (think Dumb and Dumber) has a powerful leg and has the distinction of being one of the very few kickers to be a first-round pick in the NFL draft.

15 – P Craig Hentrich, Titans – Hentrich hasn’t played this season, but we’ll recognize his strong career as a punter in Green Bay and Tennessee here. Other notable 15: Dave Zastudil, Browns

17 – PK Shayne Graham, Bengals – Graham has developed into one of the most solid kickers around. Although his consistency this season has been lacking, Graham remains a good threat for Cincy. Other notable 17: Mitch Berger, Broncos

18 – P Jeff Feagles, Giants – Feagles has been punting in the NFL forever, but he still has a roster spot. He’s one of the few practicioners of the art of directional punting left in the league as well. Other notable 18: David Buehler, Cowboys

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Colts/Ravens thoughts

In honor of a vacation week spent partly in Baltimore, we share a few thoughts on the Week 11 game between the Colts and Ravens, both from an on-field perspective and a fantasy football perspective. Indianapolis stayed undefeated by scratching out a 17-15 victory in Baltimore. This was the sixth win by four points or less this season for the 10-0 Colts, and their fourth in a row by that kind of margin. Meanwhile, the 5-5 Ravens lost by less than a touchdown for the fourth time this season.

On-field perspective
*Two pregame thoughts. First, Sports Illustrated’s Ross Tucker had a nice historical tweet just before kickoff. He said: Scoreboard here in Baltimore says “Ravens 0 INDY 0”. They still don’t recognize the “Colts” after all these years. Funny.
*Meanwhile, while I was in Baltimore this week, the hand-wringing was all about PK Matt Stover’s return to Baltimore as a Colt after so many years with the Ravens. The fact that Stover returned the same week the Ravens had to cut his replacement Steven Hauschka because of inconsistency only magnified how dependable Stover had been. No wonder the Ravens’ faithful went crazy when replacement Billy Cundiff narrowly made a 46-yard field goal in the first quarter. Cundiff hit 5-of-6 field goal attempts in the game, but the one he missed proved incredibly costly.
*Dallas Clark’s touchdown catch early in the first quarter was an incredible display of concentration and hand strength. Catching the ball by palming it in your right hand with no other support on the ball, and tapping your toes in the end zone in the process, was something that not many other receivers could do. What a play.
*Kelley Washington has been a nice find for the Ravens this year. He’s terrific on special teams, and he’s emerged as a solid No. 3 receiver as well.
*Young Colts DBs Tim Jennings, Melvin Bullitt, and Jacob Lacey all made nice plays on the ball in the first quarter. That’s a good sign for a team trying to overcome injuries to Bob Sanders, Marlin Jackson, and Kelvin Hayden.
*DE Haloti Ngata makes a huge difference for the Ravens’ defense. He busted up a fourth-down play at the end of the first quarter causing a penalty and a punt, and he makes that kind of impact regularly. He may well be the best player on that defense, and I’d argue that the Ravens need Ngata more than Terrell Suggs, who missed this game with an injury.
*The Ravens’ offense is much more intimidating when Ray Rice is in the game than when Willis McGahee is. Rice provides the opportunity for special plays, and McGahee simply can’t. It’s not that McGahee is a bad back, because he’s OK. Rice, meanwhile, is a big-play threat as a runner and a receiver. LeRon McClain, meanwhile, looks slow and tentative – nothing like the power back he was last year.
*The Colts have really restocked their playmaking ability with rookies Austin Collie and Donald Brown, along with first-year player Pierre Garcon and second-year tight end Tom Santi, who stepped up in this game. That shot of youth is vital with Marvin Harrison gone and Joseph Addai getting more banged up by the day.
*The Ravens did a good job of making plays on the ball vs. Peyton Manning after the first drive, and safeties Ed Reed and Dawan Landry both got interceptions. Reed and Landry make for a strong pair up the middle in the secondary.
*Joe Flacco isn’t the machine that Peyton Manning is, but he showed on the two-minute drill at the end of the first half that he’s a big-time quarterback. Flacco is allowing the Ravens to develop offensively as a new kind of team, and the downfield throw out of his own end zone in the third quarter was a beauty. But you could see the difference in Flacco’s inconsistency on third down, which forced the Ravens to settle for four first-half field goals. And the pick Flacco threw in the fourth quarter was more egregious than either of the interceptions Manning threw in this game.
*The Colts’ front 7 isn’t big, and the only way they could generate a ton of pressure was to send a huge blitz against Flacco. That’s something that some team is going to exploit before the end of the season. Dwight Freeney and Robert Mathis weren’t able to generate a ton of pressure on their own against young and huge Ravens OTs Michael Oher and Jared Gaither. For the Colts, Gary Brackett not only had a pick – he had the most impact on that front seven throughout the game. He’s such a solid player for Indy.
*Ravens head coach John Harbaugh did a great job of managing his replay challenges until late in the fourth quarter. He went 2-for-2 on challenges – both of which were ultra-close and therefore worth challenging regarding the outcome – and more importantly avoided a challenge that would have failed in the second quarter. That decision to pick up the red flag saved the Ravens a timeout and probably three points in the first half and 22 yards on a successful challenge in the second half. But when Harbaugh called timeout and then challenged a spot late in the fourth quarter, he cost his team its final timeout and about 40 seconds toward a last-gasp comeback.
*Reggie Wayne is one of the top five receivers in the league. He’s so good catching the ball that you’re surprised when he doesn’t come up with it. His dominance allows youngsters like Garcon and Collie to make plays in spaces much bigger than usual.

Fantasy football perspective
*Dallas Clark isn’t just the best fantasy tight end available; he’s one of the top 15 receivers of any kind in the league. No other tight end comes close to matching his production, because no tight end is as vital a part of his offense as Clark is for Indy.
*Pierre Garcon, who had a 100-yard game, has gone back ahead of Austin Collie as the Colts’ No. 2 wide receiver, mainly because he’s more prone to bust a big play. Garcon is much like Mike Wallace of Pittsburgh in that he’s going to get 2-3 shots at a huge play each week, and if he makes one of those plays, he can help your fantasy team. Garcon isn’t as valuable as some teams’ No. 2 wideouts because of the Dallas Clark factor, but he is a top-35 receiver who can spot start as long as Anthony Gonzalez’s injury continues to linger.
*Colts TE Tom Santi hadn’t had a catch all season, but he had six in this game for the Colts, including a 31-yarder. Santi must have been playing a bigger role in this game because of a matchup the Colts saw that made a two-TE set advantageous. But fantasy owners shouldn’t rely too much on Santi going forward. The Colts don’t use two-TE sets regularly enough to make Santi ownable in any league, despite his 80-yard effort in this game. The fact that Santi fumbled once in the end zone and dropped another possible touchdown won’t add to the young tight end’s chances going forward.
*Joseph Addai scored a rushing touchdown in this game, and he has at least 60 yards per scrimmage in every game but one this season. So while he feels like an unreliable fantasy back, his numbers have been good enough to put him inside the top 20 at the position. He’s a fantasy starter, but he’s not a dominant force.
*Ray Rice is just a yardage machine. He’s so good as a runner and receiver that he’s going to pile up 120-150 yards in just about any game. And if he breaks a big play or scores a touchdown, he puts up elite fantasy numbers. He’s become a dependable top-10 fantasy back.
*Derrick Mason is old for a wide receiver, but he continues to produce solid fantasy numbers as the Ravens’ unquestioned No. 1 wideout. He had more than 100 yards in this game, passing the century mark for just the second time this season. But he has had at least 78 yards in five of 10 games, which makes him a solid top-25 wideout. He’s not cemented as a starter, but he’s a nice option to have around.

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Week 8 moves

We do a weekly update on major NFL transactions. We include signings, releases, and also players who are put on injured reserve, because they are lost for the year. You can check out the Week 7 transactions here and work your way back through the season.

Additions

Chiefs (claim WR Chris Chambers on waivers, sign CB Travis Daniels) – The Chiefs pounced when their division rivals the Chargers cut Chambers, a quality receiver for a long time who seems to have lost a step or a grip or something. Chambers is probably still good enough to play for the Chiefs, though he’s not better than current No. 2 and No. 3 receivers Bobby Wade and Mark Bradley. Daniels, a former Dolphin and Brown who was among the Chiefs’ final cuts in September, comes in to add depth in the secondary after the Chiefs had to put S Jarrad Page on injured reserve for the rest of the season after suffering an injury in practice last week.

Broncos (add CB Ty Law) – Law isn’t the game changer he was back in his days with the Patriots, but last year he was an effective half-season player for the Jets. He kept himself in good shape last season, so it’s fair to assume he’ll be ready to play pretty much right away for the Broncos this year. He adds depth to a cornerback group that includes superstar Champ Bailey as well as Andre Goodman and rookie Alphonso Smith.

Buccaneers (add PK Connor Barth and Mike Mickens) – The Buccaneers tried to make two upgrades, signing Barth to replace Shane Andrus and signing Mickens to replace Marcus McCauley. As bad as the Bucs are, these moves won’t make the difference, but churning the roster looking for someone who can help now or in the future isn’t a bad plan.

49ers (add CB Keith Smith) – Smith, who spent the last five seasons with the Lions, adds depth to a secondary that will be without CB Nate Clements for several weeks. To make room for Smith on the roster, the Niners cut WR Micheal Spurlock.

Subtractions

Colts (put LB Tyjuan Hagler and CB Marlin Jackson on injured reserve) – You can read much more of the impact of these injuries in this post on the Colts. Indy promoted LB Cody Glenn from the practice squad to take Hagler’s roster spot and signed DE Josh Thomas, who played for the team over the past five years, to fill Jackson’s place on the 53-man roster.

Seahawks (cut RB Edgerrin James and CB Travis Fisher; put S C.J. Wallace on injured reserve) – James, who signed with the Seahawks just before the season, averaged just 2.9 yards per carry over the first seven games of the season. This is just about the end of James’ solid career. He did pile up just enough yards in Seattle to move into the top 10 on the NFL’s all-time rushing list, so that’s a positive to his lackluster Seahawk tenure. The Seahawks also cut Fisher, who had served as a backup corner, and put Wallace, a special-teamer, on injured reserve. By making these moves, Seattle cleared space to promote three players from the practice squad – WR Mike Hass, S Jamar Adams, and CB Roy Lewis. That will allow the Seahawks to get a look at these young players and see if they might fit as roster pieces going forward.

Texans (put TE Owen Daniels on injured reserve) – Daniels, one of the top three or four tight ends in the league, was having a great season before he suffered a torn ACL against Buffalo last week. He’s now gone for the season, which is a huge loss to the Texans’ prolific passing game. It will likely take a better effort from wide receivers Kevin Walter and Jacoby Jones to make up for Daniels’ absence, because the Texans don’t have another tight end who is anywhere close to Daniels as a receiver. To replace Daniels on the roster, the Texans promoted DE Jess Nading from the practice squad.

Patriots (cut OG Kendall Simmons) – The Pats took a chance on Simmons, the long-time Steeler who was trying to come back from a torn Achilles tendon he suffered last season, but Simmons never found a role in New England and his only game action came on special teams.

Falcons (put S Jamaal Fudge and LS Mike Schneck on injured reserve) – The Falcons put two more guys on injured reserve this week. Schneck was a reliable long snapper for the Falcons over the past several years. To replace him, the Falcons signed Bryan Pittman, who snapped for the Texans for many years. To replace Fudge, Atlanta added Charlie Peprah.

Bengals (cut OG Scott Kooistra) – Kooistra had been a backup for the Bengals since Marvin Lewis arrived in Cincy in 2003, but he had just one start during his tenure. His roster spot was taken by FB Fui Vakapuna, but his departure more likely means that rookie first-rounder Andre Smith is getting closer to playing.

Rams (cut WR Tim Carter) – Carter, a former Giant, never latched in St. Louis after arriving there earlier this season. If he can’t cut it in that mediocre receiving corps, he has little hope of hooking on elsewhere in the league.

Browns (cut PK Billy Cundiff and CB Anthony Madison) – Cundiff had served as a fill-in for the injured Phil Dawson, who is now ready to return. Madison had mainly played on special teams for Cleveland.

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Training Camp Moves – Week 5

This post is a compilation of additions NFL teams made during the fourth full week of camps. The timetable for this post opens on August 22 and continues through August 28. You can read a summary of the first week of training camp moves here; the second week moves here; the third week moves here; and the fourth week of moves here. Because moves will be coming fast and furious throughout training camp, we’re going to use quick analysis of moves each week during this time instead of creating a massive Football Relativity comparison.

Additions

Seahawks (add RB Edgerrin James) – The Seahawks’ running game sputtered early in the preseason, and new head coach Jim Mora wasted no time making a change. He brings in James, who seemed to be losing steam during his time in Arizona but did have a bit of a renaissance during the postseason. Seattle can spot James with Julius Jones to keep both fresh, and James’ ability to catch the ball allows him to be a factor in West Coast schemes like Seattle’s.

Chiefs (add OLs Ike Ndukwe and Andy Alleman) – The Chiefs, who are in the midst of rebuilding an offensive line that had gotten old, looked to Miami for reinforcements via trade. Ndukwe, who was cut by the Redskins in ’06 and the Ravens in ’07, found a home with the Dolphins last year, starting 15 games at guard. The Dolphins were looking at him as a tackle this year, but he projects as a starting guard in K.C. Alleman started four games at guard for the Dolphins last year, so he’ll have a shot at competing for a job with the Chiefs, but he looks more like a backup interior lineman than a future starter.

Panthers (add S Kevin Kaesviharn) – With starting FS Charles Godfrey suffering from a wrist injury, the Panthers needed to add safety depth. Kaesviharn, a nine-year veteran, can provide that, and he can be an acceptable fill-in starter if Godfrey’s injury lingers. He’ll have to focus on coverage, because SS Chris Harris is a big hitter who is sometimes exposed dropping into coverage.

Raiders (add LB Napoleon Harris) – Harris, a long-time Raider who went to Minnesota in the Randy Moss trade, comes back to provide linebacker depth. He can play any of the three linebacker positions, which makes him a good backup, but he probably shouldn’t be starting.

Broncos (add OG Russ Hochstein) –  Hochstein has been a long-time backup for the Patriots, starting just 20 games since 2002 but playing in at least 13 games every full season he’s been there. He’ll bring a veteran presence and some versatility to the Broncos in a trade from New England for a late-round pick next spring. Denver head coach Josh McDaniels knows what he’s getting in Hochstein, and he’s likely matching what he knows about the player to what he knows about his team. Hochstein will make the Broncos and contribute somehow. But if he starts more than in spot duty, it’s a sign that the Broncos’ line depth is lacking

Jaguars (add LB Adam Seward and WR Ernest Wilford) – Seward, who has spent his whole career as a backup in Carolina, spent the offseason with the Colts but was a training-camp cut. But he was quickly snapped up by the Jaguars to compete as a middle ‘backer. Seward is big and bulky, so he seems to fit as a two-down guy who plugs the run in the middle. Wilford had his moments in Jacksonville, but he never found a role in Miami despite getting looks both at wideout and at tight end. He fits as a red-zone target, and the Jags’ receiving corps is thin enough that he could carve out a small role.

Cowboys (add C-OG Duke Preston) – The Packers signed Preston as an unrestricted free agent from Buffalo earlier this offseason, ostensibly to compete for a starting job. But Preston instead got the axe in training camp. He’ll then hooked on in Dallas, where he will fight for a backup spot.

Buccaneers (add LB Bo Ruud) – After losing Angelo Crowell for the season, the Bucs needed LB depth. So they signed Ruud, whose brother Barrett is a starter. Bo was released by Cleveland earlier in training camp after missing his rookie season in ’08 with an injury. He could fit in as a backup, given the Crowell loss, but at the least he’ll get to play with his brother for a few weeks.

Lions (add WR-RS Glenn Holt) – Holt is a good return man and OK receiver who had his moments in Cincinnati but never found a role in Minnesota. He was cut by the Vikings but quickly claimed on waivers by Detroit, where he could find a role as a reserve receiver and returner.

Jets (add P Glenn Pakulak) – Pakulak averaged more than 47 yards per punt last year, but his net average was under 38 yards, which isn’t great. He got beaten out in Saints training camp by rookie Thomas Morstead, a fifth-round pick. But Pakulak quickly landed with the Jets, who had major punting problems last year. He has a great chance to win the job there.

Browns (add TE Nate Jackson) – Jackson had his moments as a pass-catching tight end in his six years in Denver, but he’s probably a No. 3 tight end at best.

Bears (add LB Darrell McClover) – McClover, who played in 22 games for the Bears over the past three years, returns to the team. His best chance to stick on the roster is via special teams.

Lions (add PK Billy Cundiff) – With Jason Hanson hurting to the point that he might not be ready to start the season, the Lions had to get a dependable second option at kicker. Cundiff, a former Cowboy who most recently made a team in 2006, is probably at least an accurate guy from 40 yards and in. If Hanson is hurt for the long term, though, the Lions may look at another team’s cut list for a better option.

Bengals (add PK Sam Swank) – While Chad Ochocinco’s kicking exploits were fun, the Bengals can’t risk him getting hurt, and so they found a fill-in for injured PK Shayne Graham. We mention Swank here because he’s a Wake Forest product, and we’re biased.

Subtractions

Seahawks (cut RB T.J. Duckett) – The newly added Edgerrin James replaces Duckett, who scored 10 TDs as a goal-line back last year but had just 61 carries overall. Duckett is little more than a role player now, so don’t count on much when you see him again. The ironic thing is that the former first-round pick had his best success with Mora in Atlanta, but that may reveal that he’s truly done.

Patriots (cut S Tank Williams) – Williams, a former Titan, missed his first season in New England due to injury, and he wasn’t able to find a role this year after the Pats drafted Patrick Chung. That’s a long road down for a guy who was once considered a possible successor for Rodney Harrison in New England.

Raiders (cut CB Ricky Manning and WR Samie Parker) – Oakland signed Manning last week, but a one-week look apparently told them all they needed to know about where his skills are now. Parker was once considered a prospect in Kansas City, but he’s never proved himself, and the fact that the receiver-poor Raiders cut him says all you need to know.

Browns (cut OT George Foster) – Foster, a former first-round pick with Denver who played for Detroit last year, got bounced again this offseason. He’s likely going to have to wait for an injury (like the one to Seattle’s Walter Jones) to find a spot as a backup right tackle. He’s big, but his skills aren’t great.

Chiefs (cut LB Vince Redd) – Redd, who played for New England last year, was cut just before reports of a four-game suspension to start the season began to emerge. The Chiefs decided that such a bubble player wasn’t worth the wait.

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