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Week 8 Transactions

Each week, we note and comment on the NFL’s biggest transactions. Here are the transactions between the end of Week 7 and the beginning of Week 8. We’ll begin by focusing on four fascinating cuts.

Leigh Bodden, a player on the New England Patr...

Ex-Patriots CB Leigh Bodden. Image via Wikipedia

– Bodden, once a major free-agent signing, had fallen out of the lineup in New England, and he reportedly lost interest. So he was cut, even though the Patriots were also losing Dowling to injury. Bodden cleared waivers. Faulk moved right back into the lineup after missing the early part of the season.

Vikings (cut WR Bernard Berrian) – Berrian, once a high-dollar free-agent signing, had little production and a questionable attitude in Minnesota. The Vikings, who hit on something with Michael Jenkins and even Devin Aromashodu, had enough depth to just move on.

Bears (cut S Chris Harris) – Harris, who entered the year as a starter at safety for the Bears, got benched, then got pressed into emergency starting duty, and then got cut. He landed on his feet after the Lions claimed him on waivers – just before a Bears/Lions game in Week 10. Harris adds depth to a Lions secondary that isn’t up to the level of the rest of the team.

Cowboys (cut RB Tashard Choice, activate LB Bruce Carter from physically unable to perform list) – Choice, who had some nice moments in Dallas, got hurt, and the Cowboys waived him injured to move on to rookie DeMarco Murray. Choice was claimed on waivers by the NFC East rival Redskins.

Redskins (put RB Tim Hightower and TE Chris Cooley on injured reserve) – Hightower, the Redskins’ leading rusher thus far this season, was hurt against the Carolina Panthers. Cooley battled knee and hand injuries that ultimately ended his season. These injuries further depleted a Redskins offense that is struggling mightily.

Bills (put OLB Shawne Merriman on injured reserve) – A lot has gone right in Buffalo this year, but not the Merriman experiement. His knee hasn’t been right since he was in San Diego.

Buccaneers (put RB Earnest Graham on injured reserve) – Graham, who was filling in for LeGarrette Blount at running back and was also an effective fullback/pass-catching back, tore his Achilles against the Bears. It’s a big loss for a thin Bucs backfield.

Chargers (put OLB Larry English on injured reserve) – English, a former first-round pick, will miss the second half of the season with a foot injury.

Falcons (put FB Ovie Mughelli and OG Mike Johnson on injured reserve, add FB Mike Cox and OT Kirk Chambers) – Mughelli, one of the few fullbacks with a significant role in the NFL, suffered a knee injury that will cost him the season. Cox comes on board as a fill-in. Chambers adds depth for a banged-up offensive line.

Colts (put QB Kerry Collins on injured reserve) – Collins, who suffered a concussion during his effort to fill in for Peyton Manning, won’t be able to come back. This could be the end of a pretty good career.

Dolphins (put QB Sage Rosenfels on non-football injury list, add QB J.P. Losman) – Rosenfels, who is battling a nasty strep infection that won’t go away, had to give up on the season. Losman becomes the Dolphins’ latest emergency backup quarterback.

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Sidney Rice: No longer hip

Sidney Rice, while a member of the Minnesota V...

Image via Wikipedia

Amazingly, Brett Favre isn’t the biggest newsmaker in Minnesota right now. Earlier this week, WR Sidney Rice announced he had hip surgery, which will cost him about half the season and could still land him on injured reserve. In response to Rice’s injury, the Vikings signed Javon Walker and traded for Greg Camarillo. Below are some thoughts on Rice’s injury and the acquisition of Camarillo (we already wrote about Walker here), both from an on-field perspective and a fantasy football perspective.

Rice had a breakout season last year with Favre throwing the ball, catching 83 passes for 1,312 yards and eight touchdowns. While Favre’s arrival certainly aided Rice’s development into a Pro Bowl selection, it was also the common third-year emergence for receivers like Rice who were high draft picks. (Rice was a second-rounder.) He’s big and has outstanding ball skills, which makes him a downfield threat despite marginal NFL speed. Rice’s size coupled with Percy Harvin’s breakaway ability would have given the Vikings a top-level receiving duo that’s also young, but now that Rice will miss much of the season, the Vikings don’t have a No. 1 receiver. Maybe Harvin can emerge, or maybe former high-dollar free-agent signing Bernard Berrian can recapture his promise. But neither Harvin nor Berrian has the size to be such a dependable threat as Rice.

After injuries benched Rice for half the season and put Harvin’s season in question, the Vikings  dealt for reinforcements. Camarillo, a former undrafted free agent, established himself as a solid receiving threat with 110 catches over his last two full seasons. While he has only averaged about 11 yards per catch during those two seasons, he’s a dependable possession receiver who provides depth for the Vikings and who may eventually fit into the slot if Rice and Harvin return. If nothing else, Camarillo’s acquisition ensures that the Vikings will still be able to run multi-WR sets effectively. In exchange for Camarillo, the Vikings sent Sapp to Miami. Sapp started a career-high seven games last year, and he’s proven to be a decent nickelback and special-teams player. Since Camarillo was likely losing prominence in Miami after the addition of Brandon Marshall and the development of Patrick Turner and Brian Hartline, it makes sense for Miami to get a solid role player in return for him.

For fantasy football purposes, Rice’s injury knocks him out of being a top-15 fantasy wideout and makes him a speculative pick who’s worth a roster spot in leagues with deep benches. He’s probably now worth a pick around No. 40 among wideouts. Harvin is a top-20 talent whose migraine problems make him a high risk/high reward pick, and Rice’s injury raises Harvin’s upside a bit. Berrian’s stock shoots up so that he is now draftable as a starter, while Camarillo is worth adding to draft boards among the top 200 overall. Most of all, these injury problems in his receiving corps limit Favre’s upside and knock him out of Tier 2 and onto the same level as risk/reward picks Jay Cutler, Eli Manning, and Kevin Kolb. At this point, expecting Favre to even approach his 33-TD season of a year ago is foolhardy.

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Jersey Numbers: Wide Receivers

Over the next several weeks, we’re going to look at several different positions (I can’t yet promise all) to identify the best players wearing each jersey number at each position. If this goes as planned, we’ll then compile a list of the best player wearing each jersey number in the league.

If you have quibbles, or want to add someone I forgot, leave a comment and we’ll update this post. And please have patience – this is a big job.

We’ll start in this post with the best wide receivers at each jersey number. In general, wideouts are allowed to wear numbers between 10 and 19 as well as between 80 and 89.

10 – Santonio Holmes, Steelers – We’ll go with Holmes, the defending Super Bowl MVP, in this category, but it’s a close decision over DeSean Jackson of the Eagles. Both are significant starters for their teams and emerging stars in the league. Other notable 10: Jabar Gaffney, Broncos

11 – Larry Fitzgerald, Cardinals – Fitzgerald is one of the very best receivers in the league, and so he gets the nod as the premier wideout wearing No. 11. He became a superstar in last year’s playoffs, doing what he had done in relative obscurity earlier in his career in Arizona. Fitzgerald is the real deal. Other notable 11s: Mike Sims-Walker, Jaguars; Mohammed Massaquoi, Browns; Roy Williams, Cowboys; Laveranues Coles, Bengals; Julian Edelman, Patriots; Legedu Naanee, Chargers; Roscoe Parrish, Bills; Stefan Logan, Steelers

12 – Marques Colston, Saints – Colston is the premier receiver on the league’s most potent offense, and now that he’s healthy he’s showing incredible skills for his size. That gives him the nod over Steve Smith of the Giants as the best No. 12 wideout in the league. Both Colston and Smith may have to move over for Minnesota rookie Percy Harvin at some point in the future. Other notable 12s: Michael Jenkins, Falcons; Justin Gage, Titans; Darrius Heyward-Bey, Raiders; Quan Cosby, Bengals

13 – Johnny Knox, Bears – Knox is the only notable receiver wearing No. 13 this year. The rookie out of Abilene Christian has had a nice freshman season in the NFL with three receiving TDs and a return for a score. Maybe he’ll make 13 a trendier, if not luckier, number for wideouts.

14 – Brandon Stokley, Broncos – Like 13, 14 isn’t a popular number for receivers. Stokley, who had good seasons with the Colts and the most memorable touchdown of the season off a tip in the opener against the Bengals, is the best of the bunch over St. Louis prospect Keenan Burton. Other notable 14: Eric Weems, Falcons

15 – Brandon Marshall, Broncos – Marshall’s numbers aren’t quite as good this season as fellow 15 Steve Breaston of Arizona, but Marshall is the more dynamic and more important player than Arizona’s talented third receiver. Marshall has the talent to be one of the league’s top-5 overall receivers. Other notable 15s: Kelley Washington, Ravens; Chris Henry, Bengals; Davone Bess, Dolphins; Michael Crabtree, 49ers; Courtney Roby, Saints

16 – Josh Cribbs, Browns – Lance Moore of the Saints is the only notable pure wide receiver wearing No. 16 right now, but Cribbs, Cleveland’s do-everything guy, plays enough receiver and has a receiver number, so he counts here. Cribbs catches the ball, returns kicks, and plays under center in the wildcat. He may be the league’s best return man, and he’s growing as an offensive force. Moore had a strong season as New Orleans’ slot receiver last year, but injuries have hampered his production this year. Other notable 16: Danny Amendola, Rams

17 – Braylon Edwards, Jets – Edwards had fallen out of favor in Cleveland last year and this season, and his numbers reflected that diminished importance, but he’s now in New York and gaining steam. So we’ll list him as the top 17 over rookies Mike Wallace of Pittsburgh and Austin Collie of Indianapolis. Other notable 17s: Donnie Avery, Rams; Robert Meachem, Saints

18 – Sidney Rice, Vikings – Rice is emerging as the Vikings’ most reliable receiver, and he has become one of Brett Favre’s favorite targets. His good size and exceptional ball skills and leaping ability are finally starting to shine through now that he’s in his third season. He beats a crop of rookies to earn the honor as the best receiver wearing 18. Other notable 18s: Kenny Britt, Titans; Jeremy Maclin, Eagles; Louis Murphy, Raiders; Sammie Stroughter, Buccaneers

19 – Miles Austin, Cowboys – Austin has come out of nowhere over the past three games to establish himself as an explosive threat and the Cowboys’ best receiver. Even with the return heroics of Miami’s Ted Ginn Jr. and Denver’s Eddie Royal this year, Austin is the best 19. Other notable 19: Devery Henderson, Saints

23 – Devin Hester, Bears – Because Hester came into the NFL as a defensive back, he’s been allowed to keep his old DB number of 23 even though he’s now a wide receiver. The fact that he’s Chicago’s No. 1 outside target makes this a legitimate listing for a bit of a funky number for a receiver.

80 – Andre Johnson, Texans – If you made me pick one receiver as the best in the league, this is the guy. He has freakish size, incredible speed, and great production throughout his career. The only pockmark on his resume is the fact that he’s been dinged up from time to time. So he gets an easy decision here over Donald Driver of Green Bay as the best receiver wearing 80. Other notable 80s: Earl Bennett, Bears; Malcom Floyd, Chargers; Bryant Johnson, Lions; Bobby Wade, Chiefs; Marty Booker, Falcons; Mike Thomas, Jaguars

81 – Randy Moss, Patriots – Moss is already an all-time great, and he’s still performing at a premium level for the Pats. This is an easy call, even though  current great Anquan Boldin of Arizona, past greats Torry Holt of the Jaguars and Terrell Owens of the Bills, and future great Calvin Johnson of Detroit also wear 81. This number has great depth of talent. Other notable 81: Nate Burleson, Seahawks

82 – Dwayne Bowe, Chiefs – As deep as 81 is in talent, 82 is thin. We’ll give the nod to Bowe over the Giants’ Mario Manningham because Bowe has had more good seasons, even though Manningham has been more impactful this year. Other notable 82s: Antwaan Randle El, Redskins; Brian Hartline, Dolphins

83 – Wes Welker, Patriots – Welker, who piles up gobs of catches as the jitterbug/security blanket of the Patriots offense, narrowly gets this nod over Vincent Jackson of San Diego, who has joined the list of the league’s 10 best receivers. Lee Evans of Buffalo doesn’t have equivalent numbers because his quarterbacks have stunk for years, but he’s no slouch either. Other notable 83s: Kevin Walter, Texans; Deion Branch, Seahawks; Sinorice Moss, Giants

84 – Roddy White, Falcons – White has emerged as one of the top receivers in the league over the past three years, and he looks like he’ll team with Matt Ryan for a long time as Atlanta’s dynamic duo. We’ll take the ascending White over the descending T.J. Houshmandzadeh, who has had a great career in Cincinnati but is starting to show signs of slippage in his first season in Seattle. Other notable 84s: Patrick Crayton, Cowboys; Josh Morgan, 49ers; Bobby Engram, Chiefs; Javon Walker, Raiders

85 – Chad Ochocinco, Bengals – We have to give this jersey-number to Ochocinco, since he changed his name to be his jersey number in Spanish (kind of). But Ochocinco deserves it given the renaissance year he is having with the Bengals. Derrick Mason of the Ravens contended for the honor based on his long career, while Greg Jennings of the Packers could claim this honor in the future. Other notable 85s: Pierre Garcon, Colts; Jerheme Urban, Cardinals

86 – Hines Ward, Steelers – There aren’t a lot of great receivers wearing 86, but there is one – Ward. The former Super Bowl MVP isn’t just great at catching the ball; he’s a vicious blocker downfield as well. He’s a borderline Hall of Famer who is still building his resume. Other notable 86s: Dennis Northcutt, Lions; Brian Finneran, Falcons

87 – Reggie Wayne, Colts – Wayne has seamlessly taken over for Marvin Harrison as Peyton Manning’s premier target in Indy, and now Wayne is building his own case for the Hall of Fame. There aren’t five receivers in the league who are better or more explosive than Wayne. Other notable 87s: Bernard Berrian, Vikings; Andre Caldwell, Bengals; Muhsin Muhammad, Panthers; Mike Furrey, Browns; David Clowney, Jets; Jordy Nelson, Packers; Domenik Hixon, Giants

88 – Isaac Bruce, 49ers – Bruce is no longer the dynamic force he was for years in St. Louis, but he’s good enough to claim this number as his lifetime achievement award. Rookie Hakeem Nicks of the Giants is the only other significant 88 as a receiver, but he looks as though he will be a good one. Other notable 88: Chansi Stuckey, Browns

89 – Steve Smith, Panthers – Smith hasn’t had the season this year that he’s had in the past, and he’s even felt at times that he wasn’t an asset to his team, but those problems have more to do with the struggles of Carolina QB Jake Delhomme than with Smith’s own shortcomings. Smith is just 5-foot-9, but he’s lightning quick, built like a brick house, tough to bring down, and shockingly good on jump balls. He’s still an elite receiver. Other notable 89s: Santana Moss, Redskins; Jerricho Cotchery, Jets; Mark Clayton, Ravens; Antonio Bryant, Buccaneers; James Jones, Packers

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Vikings/Steelers thoughts

A few thoughts on the Week 7 game between the Minnesota Vikings and the Pittsburgh Steelers, both from an on-field perspective and a fantasy football perspective. The Steelers took advantage of two defensive touchdowns to hand the Vikings their first loss 27-17.

On-field perspective
*Playing without CB Antoine Winfield will really hurt the Vikings. They looked really vulnerable late in last week’s game against the Ravens, and this week the Steelers were able to find some holes in the secondary, especially to rookie Mike Wallace. Winfield’s absence is especially noticeable because the depth with Benny Sapp, Karl Paymah, and rookie Asher Allen is less than ideal.
*The Steelers are now a pass-first team, not a run-first team. They showed as much on a third-quarter possession where they got first-and-goal at the 8-yard line and tried two passes (along with a busted play). The next time the Steelers got an and-goal situation, Rashard Mendenhall fumbled on first down after diving to get over the 5-yard line, not the goal line. Ben Roethlisberger is having a great year, and that’s not just a benefit for the Steelers – it’s a necessity. They can’t win without him moving the ball via the air.
*Mendenhall has taken over as the Steelers’ running back, and that’s not really a good thing. Mendenhall’s straight-up running style isn’t ideal for inside runs, and he’s lacking as a blocker and a receiver. He’s just not a special back. He looked good on off-tackle runs and tosses against the Vikes but not so great on inside runs. His total of 69 yards on 10 carries shows that lack of consistency. The difference between Mendenhall and an elite back like Adrian Peterson is staggering. Even the old-school Steelers combo of Fast Willie Parker and the Bus Jerome Bettis offered much more than Mendenhall can at this point.
*While the Steelers are a pass-first team, the most special thing Vikings is Peterson. When he gets going, he can carry the team. Plus, he can run over guys, like he did with William Gay in the two-minute drill at the end of the game. He’s the X-factor that takes the Vikings from good to great. Brett Favre (aka Spanx) can’t carry the team, although he can help. But Favre needs to be the spice, not the entree. The fact that the Vikings threw twice on and-goal plays from the 1-yard-line in the third quarter (and had to settle for a field goal) is almost criminal. Then Favre’s fumble in the red zone in the fourth quarter led to Lamarr Woodley’s defensive touchdown. The Steelers’ second defensive TD by Keyaron Fox wasn’t Favre’s fault, but the first was.
*One of the most fascinating things about the game was Favre’s propensity to look for rookie Percy Harvin on third-down plays. He targeted Harvin on at least six third-down throws in the first half, and it paid off with a 28-yard gain that sparked the Vikes’ first scoring drive. That’s a vital role for a guy with just seven games of pro experience, but it speaks to how dangerous and prepared Harvin truly is. Harvin isn’t just a dangerous kickoff returner, as he showed with his second return TD of the season, he’s also an effective receiver.
*Wide receiver Bernard Berrian was a big-money signee by the Vikings just two offseasons ago, but he’s becoming less and less relevant in the offense. He had fallen behind Harvin and Sidney Rice in the receiving pecking order even before he suffered a first-half hamstring injury. The Vikings look to Berrian scheme-wise to try to get a big play out of him, and he’s capable of doing that, but they don’t appear to rely on him on conversion plays. That’s the role of a speciality player, not a stalwart. It’s not a coincidence that Rice had 11 catches for 136 yards, not to mention a touchdown that was called back, because Rice is the Vikings’ No. 1 wideout.
*Vikings DT Kevin Williams might be the most underrated defensive tackle in the league. We hear a lot about DE Jared Allen, who is a force, while we lump Kevin in with Pat as the Williams wall. Pat Williams is a big run-stuffer, but Kevin Williams is more than that. He’s a penetrator inside who can also make plays in space. Don’t sleep on him.
*On the other side of the ledger, it’s clear that S Troy Polamalu is what makes the Steelers’ secondary special. When he was out, Pittsburgh looked vulnerable. But with Polamalu back in there, there’s suddenly fewer holes and more danger for opposing passing games. That’s the sign of an impact player.
*One young player who adds a lot to the Pittsburgh offense is rookie wideout Wallace, who had 91 total yards and a touchdown. Wallace has speed and he’s already proving to be dependable in big spots. It seems like he makes big plays every week, as he did twice in the two-minute drill at the end of the first half. He’s an outstanding third receiver for Pittsburgh.
*Minnesota has two rookies playing prominent roles in Harvin and ORT Phil Loadholt, who is very appropriately named. Loadholt and Bryant McKinnie, his fellow tackle, take gigantic to another level. But the best player on the line is OLG Steve Hutchinson, whose false-start penalty in the fourth quarter was his first flag in 27 games. That’s consistency from a guy who’s also a great blocker for the run and the pass. No wonder the Vikings made him the highest-paid guard in the league.

Fantasy Football perspective
*While we don’t like Mendenhall’s running style, as long as he’s the starter he’s still a top-25 running back. He’s going to compile enough numbers to be a solid fantasy starter, but you can’t count on him to carry your team.
*Roethlisberger is a top-10 fantasy quarterback, while Favre is outside of that tier. Favre threw for 334 yards in this game, but that total was padded by two late drives in comeback mode. Meanwhile, Roethlisberger’s solid day was probably about as bad a fantasy day as he can have, and if that’s the case he’s a solid starter.
*What we’re seeing about Berrian’s role should be a big red flag to fantasy owners, even bigger than his injury in this game. At this point, I’d take both Rice and Harvin over Berrian in fantasy leagues – and that would be the case even if Berrian were healthy.
*For Pittsburgh, Hines Ward and Santonio Holmes remain above Wallace in the fantasy pecking order, but Wallace is a top-40 wideout going forward. He’s a nice sleeper play, especially against a bad passing D or a defense who is missing a major player like the Vikings’ was. Ward didn’t have a big game in this one, while Holmes had 59 yards.
*We raved about TEs Heath Miller of Pittsburgh and Visanthe Shiancoe of Minnesota in this post last week. Even though neither had a huge game in this one, we stick by our recommendations of both to fantasy owners.

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Fantasy Football Applaud or a Fraud – Week 6

Each week, we dive into the stat sheets to see which weekly performers fantasy owners should applaud and which fantasy owners should write off as frauds. You can read past applaud or a fraud analyses in the category listing. And if we’re changing a past recommendation, we’ll include it here as well.

Quarterbacks

Marc Bulger, Rams – Bulger returned from injury and threw for 213 yards and a touchdown. But those numbers came against one of the league’s worst secondaries. Bulger is still injury prone, and he still plays with a below-average offensive line and receiving corps. He’s not a top-20 fantasy quarterback. Verdict: A fraud

Joe Flacco, Ravens – We discussed Flacco in this post on the Vikings/Ravens game, so here we just want to reiterate that Flacco is worthy of starting in fantasy leagues that have 12 or more teams. Verdict: Applaud

David Garrard, Jaguars – Some fantasy analysts will try to convince you that Garrard is a fantasy starter, and this week’s 335-yard passing game (with 31 yards rushing) would seem to be evidence. But there are many other guys I’d rather start than Garrard. To me, he falls between 10 and 14 on the fantasy quarterback list, so if you have to start him, you’re at a disadvantage. Some are selling, but we’re not buying. Verdict: A fraud

JaMarcus Russell, Raiders – Russell has worlds of talent, but he’s been worlds of terrible so far this season. He finally had a decent fantasy game Sunday – 22-of-34 for 213 yards and a touchdown – but that could easily end up being his best game of the year. Stay far, far away from Russell on the waiver wire. Verdict: A fraud

Running backs

Justin Fargas, Raiders – In the absence of Darren McFadden, Michael Bush had a representative fantasy game last week, and this week Fargas had 23 carries for 87 yards. Fargas isn’t a terrible back, but he’s running behind a terrible line, and the Bush factor makes it impossible to predict whether Fargas will actually deliver on any given week. Still, Fargas is worth a speculative pick-up if you’re desperate for RB help just in case McFadden ends up being put on injured reserve for some strange reason. Take that risk if you want, but don’t put Fargas in your lineup until the McFadden situation is clear. Verdict: A fraud

Larry Johnson, Chiefs – Johnson had his first decent fantasy game with 83 yards on 23 carries against the Redskins. But the Chiefs won’t be in most game as they were in this one, and Johnson is far from dependable in fantasy leagues. He’s ownable – barely – but you shouldn’t start him unless bye weeks and injuries leave you no choice. Verdict: A fraud

Thomas Jones, Jets – Jones isn’t the kind of back you feel wonderful about putting in your starting lineup, in large part because he often takes a while to get going. But he has generally been productive this year, with Sunday’s 220-yard effort against the Bills, highlighted by a 71-yard touchdown run, being his best of the year. Jones isn’t a No. 1 fantasy back, but he’s staved off the Leon Washington challenge (for now) and established himself as a solid No. 2 fantasy back. That means he should be starting for you. Verdict: Applaud

Laurence Maroney, Patriots – Where did that come from? In the snow and ice against the Titans, Maroney went wild, breaking a 69-yard touchdown run early and finishing with 123 yards. But we don’t believe. The Titans gave little to no real effort in this one, and Maroney hasn’t show he can run against anyone else this year. Note this performance, but don’t act on it by claiming Maroney until he has another good game. This smells too much like a fluke. Verdict: A fraud

Rashard Mendenhall, Steelers – We haven’t been recommending Mendenhall, who had 62 yards and a touchdown against the Browns. But now that it appears that Mendenhall has taken over from Willie Parker as the Steelers’ No. 1 back, there’s far more reason to start him. As long as he keeps this role, Mendenhall is a borderline No. 2 fantasy back – and therefore a starter for most owners. Verdict: Applaud

Ray Rice, Ravens – We discussed Rice in this post on the Vikings/Ravens game, so here we just want to reiterate that Rice has emerged into an every-week starting running back both in yardage and scoring-based leagues. Verdict: Applaud

Jonathan Stewart, Panthers – Stewart ran for 110 yards and scored for the second straight week against the Buccaneers. As the Panthers have won two straight, they have been able to rely once again on their running attack, and that has gotten Stewart more chances. That makes Stewart a No. 3 running back and a nice flex option against favorable matchups. Finally, his arrow is pointed up. Verdict: Applaud

Leon Washington, Jets – Washington got a lot of buzz as a sleeper this year because he made so much out of limited carries over the past couple of seasons. But this year, he hasn’t done much – avoiding the end zone entirely. So while he had 99 yards on 15 carries against the Bills Sunday, he’s still not worthy of starting or even of flex-spot consideration in most leagues right now. Verdict: A fraud

Cadillac Williams, Buccaneers – The Bucs are epically bad, but Cadillac has been a nice story for them. He’s emerged as their best back, and he’s delivered fantasy production, such as his 77-yard, one-touchdown day against the Panthers. It’s now at the point where Cadillac becomes a nice flex option against bad defenses like the Panthers’ D was Sunday. If you picked him up, you got a nice little find. Verdict: Applaud

Wide receivers

Bernard Berrian, Vikings – We discussed Berrian in this post on the Vikings/Ravens game, so here we just want to reiterate that despite his touchdown Sunday, Berrian is a No. 4 fantasy wideout and not a regular starter for most fantasy leagues. Verdict: A fraud

Josh Cribbs, Browns – You’ll have to check where Cribbs is eligible in your league, but note that he had 45 rushing yards in addition to a kickoff return for a touchdown against Pittsburgh. If Cribbs keeps getting 8-10 offensive touches, he’s worth owning in larger fantasy leagues because he’s got such great ability to break big plays. He’s a fantasy sleeper you should notice. Verdict: Applaud

Derrick Mason, Ravens – We discussed Mason in this post on the Vikings/Ravens game, so note that he’s the only Ravens’ receiver worth starting. He slips under the radar, but he’s a true No. 1 receiver for the Ravens and a borderline No. 2 fantasy receiver now that Joe Flacco is flinging the ball around like crazy. Verdict: Applaud

Lance Moore, Saints – Moore is finally healthy from his hamstring injury, so it’s no surprise that he had his best game of the year with a six-catch, 78-yard day that included his first TD of the year. He fits in as New Orleans’ No. 2 receiving target, and even with the Saints’ sharing mentality he still is a No. 3 fantasy wideout. Verdict: Applaud

Hakeem Nicks, Giants – Nicks scored his third touchdown of the year and had 114 receiving yards against the Saints. His numbers were the epitome of garbage-time production, but the fact that he’s showing up on the scoresheet so frequently is worth noting. At this point, he’s worth a pickup as a No. 5 fantasy wideout. Verdict: Applaud

Sidney Rice, Vikings – We discussed Rice in this post on the Vikings/Ravens game, but suffice it to note here after his breakout game (six catches for 176 yards) that he’s now a No. 3 fantasy receiver who could grow into a No. 2 by the end of the season. Grab him now if he’s available, and if you have him consider putting him in your starting lineup. Verdict: Applaud

Sammie Stroughter, Buccaneers – Stroughter had a kickoff return for a touchdown, and he also had 65 receiving yards against Carolina. The rookie is an interesting prospect, but he’s still only the Bucs’ No. 3 wideout. Pass for now, but keep an eye to see if Stroughter moves up the depth chart. Verdict: A fraud

Tight ends

Todd Heap, Ravens – We discussed Heap in this post on the Vikings/Ravens game, so here we just want to reiterate that Heap should not be starting for your fantasy team. Verdict: A fraud

Zach Miller, Raiders – Sunday’s game against the Eagles – six catches, 139 yards and a touchdown – reminds everyone that Miller is a really good player. Just don’t forget that JaMarcus Russell is a really bad quarterback. As talented as Miller is, his offensive situation keeps him from being a starting fantasy tight end. Sorry,  Zach. Verdict: A fraud

Visanthe Shiancoe, Vikings – We discussed Shiancoe in this post on the Vikings/Ravens game, so here we just want to reiterate that Shiancoe is worthy of being an every-week starter at tight end. Verdict: Applaud

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Ravens/Vikings thoughts

A few thoughts on the Week 6 game between the Baltimore Ravens and the Minnesota Vikings, both from an on-field perspective and a fantasy football perspective. The Vikings survived a last-second field goal attempt to win a 33-31 barnburner.

On-field perspective
*Vikings QB Brett Favre got off to a hot start, but after the first two drives he started to come back to earth. Favre still throws hard, but his receivers helped him out with some nice catches of balls that were a tad off target. He wasn’t always 100 percent sharp, but he was plenty good enough for the Vikings to win. If Favre continues to play like this, the Vikings are going to be tough to beat, because the rest of their team is stout.
*One thing helping Favre is his underrated group of receivers. Sidney Rice is emerging as a dependable threat, and Bernard Berrian and Percy Harvin both bringspeed and surprising toughness. And TE Visanthe Shiancoe is a terrific middle of the field target. Minnesota’s receiving corps doesn’t get a lot of props, but it’s better than you think.
*Meanwhile, Ravens QB Joe Flacco lacks that kind of threats. The fact that RB Ray Rice was the team’s leading receiver entering the game says it all. Derrick Mason is generally dependable, although he offers few breakaway opportunities. The rest of the receiving group is pedestrian. That’s going to hold the Ravens back in games like this one when they’re trying to play from behind.
*While the Ravens showed vulnerability on defense, I liked the offense’s persistence throughout the game. Even though they were down early, they fought back and made a game of it. That heart makes the Ravens dangerous despite their shortcomings.
*Rice is a emerging young player, but Flacco needs to fight his propensity to check down to him is a little too much of a security blanket right now. Rice had six first-half catches, including a line-of-scrimmage check-down on the final offensive snap of the half on a play that Flacco should have thrown into the end zone on. That’s the kind of thing Flacco will learn to do as he becomes more secure in what he can and can’t do. I’m all for using Rice as a weapon, as on his long fourth-quarter catch and run, but the Ravens can’t rely on him to move the offense as a check-down option.
*The Ravens’ defense gets a lot of pub, but it showed some softeness in the secondary, especially early. The best defensive player I saw was Terrell Suggs, who is a great pass rusher but a good player all over the field. He’s as complete a player as a 3-4 outside linebacker can be.
* The Vikings’ defensive line is stout. Jared Allen gets all the attention, but Kevin Williams blows stuff up inside on a regular basis, and Ray Edwards and Pat Williams are assets as well. That’s as good a group of four as there is in the league. Allen made some plays against Ravens rookie OLT Michael Oher, although Oher wasn’t completely embarrassed the way Green Bay’s Daryn Colledge was against Allen.
*You have to wonder, after Steven Hauschka missed a 44-yard field goal that would have won the game, if the Ravens wish they had given stalwart kicker Matt Stover (now with the Colts) another year. That miss was a killer.

Fantasy Football perspective
*Adrian Peterson is really, really good. ‘Nuff said. Even against a good defense, you see his talent pop off the screen, and he unquestionably is a No. 1 fantasy back.
*Sidney Rice is going to emerge as the Vikings’ No. 1 receiver by the end of the season. He’s the guy Favre seems to look to most often, and his size allows him to sit down in zones, while he has excellent hands. Rice may never be a 12-TD receiver, but he can develop into an 80-catch guy, and he can break a big play from time to time, as he showed twice in the second half. Rice should be at least a No. 3 fantasy receiver in larger leagues over the rest of the season.
*Bernard Berrian, meanwhile, has a relatively minor role in the offense, especially given his contract. He did catch a first-quarter touchdown, but he was wide open on that play, which definitely helped. He’s more of a No. 4 fantasy wideout. But his big-play ability, which he showed by drawing a long pass-interference penalty in the fourth quarter, is still an asset to the Vikings and gives him fantasy value as a fill-in.
*Percy Harvin, meanwhile, is faster and tougher than you would think. He’s still learning to be a receiver, but he has a surprising amount of polish for a rookie. He’s a borderline No. 3 fantasy receiver right now who will be much better next year.
*Visanthe Shiancoe is a top-10 fantasy tight end. His seven-TD season in ’08 looked like a fluke, given his past performance, but he’s following up on it in 2009. He caught his fourth and fifth TDs of the year and had several other nice grabs. He’s a big, rangy target who should be a good receiver – it just took him a while to develop. But now, he’s should be an every-week starter at tight end.
*Willis McGahee is probably the biggest fantasy anomaly of the season thus far. He has seven TDs but his role in the offense doesn’t support that kind of production. So don’t fall victim to his numbers and consider McGahee anything more than a No. 3 fantasy back. Meanwhile, Ray Rice is getting the lion’s share of the carries and he’s developing into a huge threat. This was a breakout fantasy game for Rice, who had two rushing touchdowns and 194 total yards from scrimmage. All of us now need to recognize that Rice is an every-week fantasy starter no matter who the Ravens are playing.
*Derrick Mason is the only Ravens’ wideout you want on a fantasy team. Mark Clayton and Kelley Washington don’t get enough looks, even though Clayton did have a touchdown catch in the fourth quarter, and TE Todd Heap had to stay in and block often enough that it will hamper his fantasy value. With OT Jared Gaither hurt, that trend for Heap could continue.
*While Joe Flacco doesn’t have one great target, he moves the ball around enough that he can still be hugely productive. His 385-yard, two-touchdown performance is the kind of thing he has done all season. He’s now a top-12 fantasy quarterback. Likewise, Favre is a top-12 fantasy quarterback. He had 278 yards and three TD passes in this game.

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Applaud or a Fraud – Top 35 Wide Receivers

Over the next several weeks, we’re going to take our preseason draft board and break down the top players at each position in an effort to determine which players are living up to their draft status, which are surpassing their draft status, and which are falling below their draft status. We’ll use our Applaud or a Fraud titles to compare these players vs. preseason expectations, but you’ll want to read each player’s report to see what the verdict means for him.

We’ve already done this with the top 35 running backs and emerging running backs, both of which we covered last week. Now we turn to the top 35 receivers from our preseason draft board.

As a companion to this piece, we’ll look at the top wide receivers who weren’t in our top 35 before the season and try to determine whether we should applaud them or consider them frauds for the rest of the season. Watch for that post tomorrow.

1. Larry Fitzgerald, Cardinals – It’s four games, four touchdowns for Fitzgerald, who had a two-score game in Week 5 to cement his status as a fantasy stud again this year. While Fitz hasn’t been the dominant force he was in the playoffs last year, he’s doing just fine as a No. 1 fantasy receiver. Expecting much more than this is just being greedy. Verdict: Applaud

2. Andre Johnson, Texans – Like Fitzgerald, Johnson had two TDs in Week 5, but his numbers actually look a bit better than Fitzgerald. Johnson is averaging 87 yards per game and has had two two-TD games. He’s also averaging a whopping 15.6 yards per catch. Aside from an average Week 1 performance, Johnson has been the fantasy bellweather that owners expected when they drafted him. Verdict: Applaud

3. Calvin Johnson, Lions – Johnson got off to a bit of slow start as rookie QB Matthew Stafford gained steam, and then a Week Five injury held him to just one two-yard catch against the Steelers. So Johnson’s numbers are not quite what fantasy owners expected, but he still has 325 receiving yards plus a bonus 37 yards rushing. Given his Week 5 injury, those numbers will do for a No. 1 fantasy wideout – just barely. We’ll clap, although if his current injury lingers we might have to reluctantly change our verdict. Verdict: Applaud

4. Randy Moss, Patriots – Moss is averaging 73 yards a game, which is OK for a top receiver, but he has just one touchdown so far this season. The Tom Brady/Moss combo certainly isn’t what it was two years ago, which may be leaving some fantasy owners struggling. This is another marginal call for a top receiver, but we’ll clap based on Moss’ solid yardage total. Verdict: Applaud

5. Steve Smith, Panthers – Smith suffered through Jake Delhomme’s Week One meltdown, and the Panthers’ offensive woes have held him to 259 yards from scrimmage in four games. Even worse, his first and only score of the season was a two-point conversion in Week 5 against the Redskins. It’s certainly not his fault, but you just can’t praise what Smith has provided fantasy owners thus far. Even worse, you can’t project that much more going forward. Smith is not a No. 1 fantasy wideout this year. Verdict: A fraud

6. Greg Jennings, Packers – Jennings has had a weird year. He had 106 yards in Week One, and then didn’t catch a pass in Week 2. He had 103 yards on just two catches in Week 3, and then had just 31 yards in Week Four. The overall yards-per-game total is OK for Jennings – 60 yards per game – but his wild inconsistency and lack of scoring (one TD plus a two-pointer) leaves him just short of applause. This year, he looks more like a good No. 2 fantasy receiver with upside than a true No. 1 fantasy wideout. Verdict: A fraud

7. Reggie Wayne, Colts – Wayne has been the most consistent fantasy wideout thus far this year, and his totals of 95 yards per game and four total touchdowns are nearly the best in the league. In only one game has Wayne had less than 60 receiving yards, which means you can rely on him for big numbers week after week. Clap it up for the No. 1 overall fantasy receiver thus far and going forward. Verdict: Applaud

8. Anquan Boldin, Cardinals – After a sorry Week One, in which he had just 19 yards receiving, Boldin has had at least 69 receiving yards in the last three games. He has just one touchdown, but his total of 252 yards is fine four games into the season. He’ll need to get in the end zone more often to draw season-long applause, but we’re clapping for now. Verdict: Applaud

9. Roddy White, Falcons – After a so-so start to the season, White had a huge Week 5 against the Seahawks with 210 yards and two touchdowns. Now his season totals of 329 yards and three TDs put him among the top fantasy receivers in the game. That’s his rightful place – as a solid No. 1 fantasy wideout. Verdict: Applaud

10. Terrell Owens, Bills – I kept moving Owens down my rankings in the preseason, to the point where I had him as a borderline No. 1 receiver, but I couldn’t imagine him bottoming out the way he has thus far. He was completely shut out in Week 3 and has just 12 catches in five games, and he’s averaging just 40 yards per game with a single touchdown in Week 2. Owens is barely startable in leagues that have three WR spots in the lineup. You can’t clap for that. Verdict: A fraud

11. T.J. Houshmandzadeh, Seahawks – Houshmandzadeh is another wideout who started slow, but he has a 100-yard game and then a two-TD game in his last two outings. He’s averaging 65 yards per game, even though starting QB Matt Hasselbeck missed two games and much of a third. Plus, the arrow is pointing up at this point. Houshmandzadeh looks like he’s going to be a solid No. 2 fantasy wideout going forward. Given this draft position, that kind of production works just fine. Verdict: Applaud

12. Dwayne Bowe, Chiefs – Bowe will give you heartburn because he seems to catch his TD passes late in games when it appears like he’ll be a fantasy bust. But the bottom line is that he has scored touchdowns in three of the four games he played, and in each of those games he had at least four catches. He missed Week 3 due to injury and had just one catch the following week when he still wasn’t 100 percent healthy, but when he’s been right he’s been an acceptable fantasy starter because of his touchdowns. So while it’s a little nerve-wracking to do so, we’ll clap for him as a No. 2 fantasy wideout. Verdict: Applaud

13. Marques Colston, Saints – Colston is the de facto No. 1 receiver in New Orleans’ high-powered offense, but the Saints have so many threats that it’s hard to get consistent production out of any single player. Colston comes closest, with 228 yards and three touchdowns in four games thus far. But he’s also been held under 35 receiving yards in two of those four games. That keeps Colston from being a No. 1 fantasy receiver, but he’s a quality No. 2 fantasy wideout who can throw up big numbers any week. Verdict: Applaud

14. Vincent Jackson, Chargers – Jackson established himself as an every-week starter in fantasy leagues last year, and this year he’s taken the leap to being a No. 1 guy. His worst games are 56-yard efforts, and he’s totalled 373 yards in four games total. Plus, he has two touchdowns. He’s emerging as a No. 1 fantasy force, and that’s reason for a standing ovation. Verdict: Applaud

15. Braylon Edwards, Jets – Had we done this analysis last week, Edwards would have been judged a fraud with no hope for the rest of the season. But now that he’s been traded to the Jets, there’s reason for hope. Edwards had five catches for 64 yards and a score in his first game in green, and it looks like he’s immediately stepping in as a red-zone and down-field threat. And that’s even before he masters the offense. So while Edwards has had two awful fantasy games and has just 15 catches on the season and is averaging just 40 yards per game, we’ll applaud him based on what we expect going forward. He should at least be a regular fantasy starter now that he’s a Jet all the way. Verdict: Applaud

16. Brandon Marshall, Broncos – Marshall’s litany of off-season transgressions impeded his fantasy value entering the season, and owners were right to have questions about his role even though his talent was undeniable. But the trend is undoubtedly pointing up at this point. In each of the last three games, Marshall has had at least 70 yards from scrimmage and at least one touchdown . Those are No. 1 fantasy receiver numbers. Now that Kyle Orton has proven he can put up some numbers in Josh McDaniels’ offense, Marshall is a No. 1 fantasy wideout as he has been the past couple of years. Verdict: Applaud

17. Wes Welker, Patriots – Welker had a huge game with 12 catches for 93 yards in Week One, and then he missed the next two games due to injury. But last week he appeared to be fully back with eight catches for 86 yards and a score against the Broncos. So while Welker has been a bust so far for fantasy owners because he missed so much time, he’s now back to being a terrific No. 2 fantasy receiver. You can expect the same going forward. Verdict: Applaud

18. Roy Williams, Cowboys – Some penciled Williams in as a top No. 2 fantasy wideout, but I was skeptical entering the season. That skepticism was justified. He missed Week 5 with an injury, but before that he had two good games with at least 75 receiving yards and two games with 35 yards or less. Plus, he has just one touchdown on the season. Even though I was down on Williams, I wasn’t down enough. He’s no more than a No. 3 fantasy receiver going forward. Verdict: A fraud

19. DeSean Jackson, Eagles – I was high on Jackson before the year, ranking him as a borderline No. 2 wideout instead of as the No. 3 fantasy WR that most lists slated him to be. Thus far, that gamble has more or less paid off. He has just 13 catches in four games, but in two games he had more than 115 yards from scrimmage and a touchdown, and he added a return touchdown in Week One. He’s averaging 77 yards from scrimmage per game, which is quality production. While DJax isn’t a great player in a point-per-catch league, he’s been a solid fantasy stud. Last week’s one-catch, one-yard performance is a red flag, but we’ll consider that an anomaly until we see it again. Verdict: Applaud

20. Santana Moss, Redskins – Moss started really slow, with 5 catches for 41 yards in the first two games combined. But since then, he’s taken off with two really good games and a so-so game in Week 5. Moss’ unpredictability keeps him from being a sure-fire every week start, but if he’s a borderline No. 2 fantasy receiver for your team, you’re in OK shape. That means we’ll clap for him. Verdict: Applaud

21. Chad Ochocinco, Bengals – I was down on ol’ 8-5 coming into the season, but Chad has rebounded to once again become a No. 1 fantasy receiver. He’s averaging 70 yards per game, and in his one paltry yardage game (24 yards vs. Cleveland), he scored two touchdowns. So he’s provided consistent production. So if you drafted Ochocinco here, or even as the No. 10 or No. 12 overall receiver, you’ve gotten all you wanted and then some. Give Chad some attention, because he deserves applause from fantasy owners. Verdict: Applaud

22. Eddie Royal, Broncos – While Brandon Marshall is emerging, Royal has yet to come close to matching his ’08 production. I moved Royal up in the preseason as I started moving Marshall down, so Royal probably should have ended up around No. 30 at receiver before the opener given the uncertainty about Kyle Orton. But even at that marginal No. 3 starter level, his production – 18 catches for 148 yards and just one touchdown in five games – is lacking. He’s a good player, but the production has yet to earn applause. He may turn it around, but we can’t clap yet. Verdict: A fraud

23. Bernard Berrian, Vikings – When Brett Favre signed, we figured that Berrian would follow up on his sneaky good ’08 fantasy season by becoming a starting-caliber receiver. But Sidney Rice and Percy Harvin seem to be getting as many looks as Berrian is, and Berrian hasn’t produced by numbers. He has just 19 catches for 216 yards and one touchdown. Those aren’t starting-caliber receiver numbers, and the way the Vikings’ passing game is spreading things out, it’s hard to see Berrian stepping things up big time. So we can’t clap for him here. Verdict: A fraud

24. Lance Moore, Saints – Moore had a great season last year, but injuries have limited him to just three catches so far in ’09. Even though he’s missed one full game and been limited in others, we can’t clap. Moore might be a sleeper pickup going forward, but projecting him anywhere near a starting lineup is farfetched right now. Verdict: A fraud

25. Santonio Holmes, Steelers – After the ’08 playoffs, it seemed as though Holmes was emerging as the Steelers’ top receiver. But Hines Ward is among the league leaders in receiving yards right now, and rookie Mike Wallace is filling the Nate Washington role to give Pittsburgh a legit No. 3 receiver. Those factors, plus a few drops, have held down Holmes’ value. He’s averging 67 receiving yards per game, which is OK, but he has just one touchdown. At this draft position, Holmes needed to be starting quality, and he’s just a hair below that level. So this is a close verdict. And since we’re being generous, close points to clapping – barely. Verdict: Applaud

26. Antonio Bryant, Buccaneers – Bryant had a ridiculously season coming out of nowhere last year, and we were skeptical he could repeat it and be a No. 1 fantasy receiver again. So we put Bryant as a No. 3 receiver. But he has not yet even been that. He missed Week Two and had just three catches through Week 3, but he is coming on at least a little bit with nine catches for 106 yards and a touchdown the last two weeks. So that’s a sign of hope, but it’s not reason for applause, even at this draft position. Verdict: A fraud

27. Jerricho Cotchery, Jets – Cotchery ended up in this spot because he was an above-average receiver who was the default No. 1 option with the Jets. He delivered on that status early, with at least four catches for at least 71 yards in each of the first four games. He’s battling a hamstring now, which limited him to one catch for four yards, and now that Braylon Edwards is in town Cotchery’s role will slip, but we’ll clap for what he’s done so far. Cotchery was a terrific No. 2 fantasy receiver for the first quarter of the season, and he’ll be a solid No. 3 fantasy wideout the rest of the way. Verdict: Applaud

28. Lee Evans, Bills – We figured Evans was so good that he would maintain at least decent fantasy production even with Terrell Owens coming to town. But as the Bills’ offense has bottomed out, Evans’ numbers have been awful. He’s averaging just 52 yards per game, and he has just one touchdown. Even worse, he has more than 32 yards in just one game. Evans is still a talent, but his bad situation keeps him from being anywhere close to a fantasy starting lineup. Verdict: A fraud

29. Kevin Walter, Texans – Walter missed the first two games of the season due to injury, and since returning he has been up and down. He had a huge first game with seven catches for 96 yards and a score, but his next two weeks have averaged just 39 yards per game. Walter still should emerge as a No. 3 fantasy wideout given the Texans’ prolific offense, but he hasn’t yet, and so we can’t clap. Verdict: A fraud

30. Torry Holt, Jaguars – When he moved to Jacksonville, it appeared that Holt would be the Jags’ No. 1 receiver. But Mike Sims-Walker has assumed that role, keeping Holt’s value down. In the four games he’s played with Sims-Walker, Holt has had between 42 yards and 65 yards. He did break out in Week 5 with a 95-yard game, but that was because Sims-Walker was suspended. Holt hasn’t scored this year either. Holt’s worth owning, but he shouldn’t end up in your starting lineup unless the injury bug bites you multiple times in a single week. Verdict: A fraud

31. Hines Ward, Steelers – We downgraded Ward because we figured he had to slow down at some point, and we thought Santonio Holmes was ready to surpass him. But that hasn’t happened. Ward is fourth in the league with 440 receiving yards so far, and he scored his first touchdown last week. Ward is once again a solid fantasy starter and deserving of your applause. Verdict: Applaud

32. Laveranues Coles, Bengals – Coles has been a solid fantasy receiver for many years, and we figured that moving to the Bengals he would fall into the No. 2 role behind Chad Ochocinco. But Coles is behind Chris Henry and even Andre Caldwell in the Cincy WR pecking order, and his numbers have plummeted. He has just 10 catches for 78 yards through five games, and has just one touchdown. He’s not even ownable in fantasy leagues right now. It looks like the big contract the Bengals gave Coles isn’t going to pay off. Verdict: A fraud

33. Donald Driver, Packers – I’ve never been a Driver fan, even as he’s put up big fantasy numbers. This year, I projected him as just a marginal No. 3 fantasy wideout, but he once again has been better than I expected. He has at least four catches in every game and is averaging 72 yards per game. He also has two touchdowns. Those are No. 2 fantasy receiver numbers and good value for where he was drafted. Verdict: Applaud

34. Derrick Mason, Ravens – Mason was one of the hardest guys to rate before the season because he retired and then unretired. Still, we slated him as the Ravens’ best receiver and a marginal No. 3 fantasy guy. He has been the Ravens’ best receiver, and through five games he has 284 yards and two touchdowns. Even though he took a bagel in the catch column in Week 5, Mason has been a solid starting option given where he was drafted. And with Joe Flacco really emerging as a fantasy producer at quarterback, Mason should continue to have solid fantasy value. Verdict: Applaud

35. Devin Hester, Bears – We figured that with Jay Cutler in Chicago, someone had to emerge as a fantasy relevant receiver. We pegged Hester as the guy with the best opportunity for that, but the truth is that Cutler has spread the ball around using Hester, Johnny Knox, Earl Bennett, Greg Olsen, and even Kellen Davis. Hester has OK numbers through four games, with 189 yards and two touchdowns. But he’s had two great fantasy games and two horrible games. As a No. 3 fantasy receiver, he’s a boom or bust guy in your starting lineup, but this far down the draft order, that’s actually OK. Hester probably has 4-6 huge games left in him this season, and although it may be frustrating trying to find those games, that’s reason enough to clap for him at this draft position. Verdict: Applaud

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