Tag Archives: anthony dixon

Gored, plus other Week 13 transactions

San Francisco 49ers running back Frank Gore wa...

Image via Wikipedia

Each week we share insights, analysis, and opinions of the week’s transactions. To see previous posts, click this link and start working back.

It’s an IR-filled week, as many teams sought replacements for players who they had to put on injured reserve. Perhaps the most significant injury was to San Francisco RB Frank Gore, who suffered a broken hip Monday night against the Cardinals. Gore has largely been the 49ers’ offense not just this season but for the last several years, and San Francisco will sorely miss him. The question that must be asked at this point is whether Gore can return healthy. He’s had more than his share of injuries, and with more than 1,500 touches on his NFL resume, coming back next season at age 28 is no certainty. Brian Westbrook, who emerged from nowhere Monday night with a nice performance, can help fill in down the stretch as the 49ers keep their NFC West hopes alive, as can practice-squad promotee DeShawn Wynn. But San Francisco also needs to find out if rookie Anthony Dixon really has a future over the next five games.

In other moves…

Raiders (put QB Bruce Gradkowski on IR, add QB J.T. O’Sullivan) – Gradkowski has started four games for the Raiders this year, including the last two, and Tom Cable seems to favor him over Jason Campbell despite the fact that Oakland’s three-game winning streak came with Campbell at the helm. But Gradkowski suffered a throwing shoulder injury last week against Miami, and since he wasn’t going to be able to throw for a week or two, Oakland had no choice but to make a change. Now’s the time for Campbell to seize the starting job once and for all in Oakland.

Bengals (put DE Antwan Odom on IR) – Odom started out like a house afire in 2009, but the sack specialist never got going this year due to a performance-enhancing drug suspension and now a wrist injury. He had just four tackles in four games with no sacks after piling up eight sacks in six games last season.

Patriots (put OG Stephen Neal on IR) – Neal, who had missed the last three games with a shoulder injury, now will miss the rest of the season for the Patriots. Dan Connolly has been filling in at Neal’s right guard spot.

Bills (put DE Dwan Edwards on IR) – Edwards got a nice contract to move to Buffalo and become a starter as a 3-4 defensive end. He’s out now with a hamstring injury.

49ers (add PK Jeff Reed) – Reed, the longtime Steeler, takes over for the released Shane Andrus as Joe Nedney’s replacement in San Francisco. Reed has been inconsistent this year, but he has far more experience than Andrus.

Lions (put PK Jason Hanson on IR) – Hanson, the long-tenured Lion, landed on injured reserve with a right knee injury. Dave Rayner is already filling in.

Browns (claim S Sabby Piscitelli on waivers) – The Buccaneers lost starting S Cody Grimm, who was filling in for the suspended Tanard Jackson. But instead of promoting Piscitelli to the job, they released the four-year veteran who started 20 games in ’08 and ’09 combined. Piscitelli landed with the Browns via waivers, while the Buccaneers brought in Larry Asante for safety depth.

Dolphins (activate DE Phillip Merling from NFI list) – Merling was thought to be lost for the season due to an injury suffered in offseason workouts, but because he was on the non-football injury list instead of injured reserve, the Dolphins are able to bring him back this season. Merling played all 32 games in his first two seasons, and he should provide depth at defensive end in Miami’s 3-4.

2 Comments

Filed under Fantasy Football, Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency, NFL Injuries

RB roundup

Among the copious amounts of NFL news over the weekend were several key running back moves. Let’s analyze these moves on the field and from a fantasy football perspective.

In San Francisco, the 49ers responded to the retirement of Glen Coffee by signing Brian Westbrook as Frank Gore’s backup. Westbrook had a dynamic eight-year career in Philadelphia, producing big numbers as a runner and receiver and proving to be a team-first, smart guy. The problem with Westbrook was his durability. He missed games in every year of his Eagles career, and that durability is one of the reasons the Eagles moved on. Because San Francisco relies on Gore so heavily, Westbrook will have a limited role, and that may enable him to last throughout the season in San Fran. For a 49ers team trying to move into the playoffs again, Westbrook is a worthwhile investment as a role player.
Fantasy analysis: Gore remains a top-8 fantasy running back even with Westbrook arriving. Westbrook rates higher than Coffee would have but will be a No. 5 back in most leagues. Westbrook’s arrival makes Anthony Dixon a draft pick only in the largest leagues.

In New Orleans, the Saints responded to Lynell Hamilton’s season-ending injury by adding ex-Redskin Ladell Betts as their No. 3 back. Betts spent his first nine years in Washington, and although he was a lead back in just one year, he proved his value as a versatile back who can block and catch in addition to run. He steps in for Hamilton in the role that Mike Bell had last year for New Orleans as Pierre Thomas’ counterpart and short-yardage specialist. Betts may not be the thumper that Bell was, but he’s good enough to allow the Saints to keep Thomas fresh, and that’s all they could hope for with a mid-August replacement.
Fantasy analysis: Betts’ addition does not affect the fantasy stock of Thomas or Reggie Bush. Betts becomes a potential No. 5 back in larger leagues.

In Houston, the Texans’ offense took a big hit when second-round pick Ben Tate suffered a season-ending ankle injury in the preseason opener. Tate was slated to compete with Arian Foster as the Texans’ featured back, and Houston head coach Gary Kubiak has shown he likes to have a deep stable of running backs. Now that Tate’s out for the year, Houston will need Foster to become an every-down back and Steve Slaton to regain consistency as a third-down back. Tate’s injury is a blow to Houston’s prolific offense, and that offense is the reason the Texans have playoff hopes.
Fantasy analysis: Tate’s injury means that Foster is now a clear-cut No. 3 fantasy running back who approaches the top 25 at the position. It also makes Slaton a better bet as a No. 4 fantasy back. It’s possible that another Texans back, such as Chris Henry, could emerge as a sleeper as well, so watch the preseason to see if someone else emerges.

In Tennessee, the feel-good story of RB Stafon Johnson took a nasty turn when the undrafted rookie suffered a season-ending ankle injury in the preseason opener. Johnson, a starter at USC who suffered a catastrophic throat injury during a weighlifting session when the bar fell on his throat, was trying to return to the field, but this injury makes the NFL an impossibility this year and even more of an improbability going forward. Johnson deserves better luck. The Titans signed vet Samkon Gado to fill Johnson’s roster spot.
Fantasy analysis: Neither Johnson nor Gado had or has fantasy value. Javon Ringer is the handcuff to Chris Johnson, and LeGarrette Blount is worth a look as a sleeper if he makes the team.

Leave a comment

Filed under Fantasy Football, Football Relativity

What’s 86ing 49ers?

Strange things are afoot in San Francisco, where the 49ers have lost two young players. Second-year RB Glen Coffee has retired, and third-year DT Kentwan Balmer (a former first-round pick) is AWOL and will likely be released. Below are some thoughts on Coffee’s retirement. But first, we want to try to figure out what’s happening in San Francisco.

The 49ers emerged as a chic playoff pick as outsiders looked at head coach Mike Singletary’s old-school approach, a hard-hitting defense, and an offense that features stalwart Frank Gore and up-and-comers Vernon Davis and Michael Crabtree, plus two new first-round picks on the offensive line. With the Cardinals losing so many prominent players, San Francisco looked just a few days ago to have a chance to win the NFC West for the first time in a long time.

But now, with Coffee choosing to leave and Balmer leaving, we have to ask an unpopular question: Is Singletary too hard on his players? Singletary has famously stuck to using the old-school Oklahoma drill in training camp, and he’s working players hard, as Singletary worked during his Hall of Fame playing career. The approach has apparently turned the light on for Davis, who had a sterling 2009 season after disappointing early in his career. But that same approach may have been too much for Coffee and Balmer. Maybe that’s not the issue, but the question deserves to be asked.

I like Singletary. We went to the same church in Chicago, and I believe he wants the best for his players and for his franchise. He’s done a good job in San Francisco, going 13-12 in a year and a half with a roster that’s only now getting premium players. But if Singletary’s hard-nosed, old-school approach is going to scare off young players – especially premium draft picks like Balmer (a first-rounder) and Coffee (a third-rounder), then in the end it may be counterproductive. Coaching matters in the NFL, but talent is also essential, and a growing team like San Francisco can’t afford a talent leak. (We’ve seen even in the winning tradition in New England in recent years that letting talent leave lessens the margin of error significantly.)

Singletary is at a crossroads, and winning is what will earn him currency. If he wins, he can continue with his hard-nosed ways, and the occasional departure of a talented player won’t be remembered. But if he doesn’t win, these departures will signal a trend. It’s the same issue that Josh McDaniels faces in Denver to a greater degree, only football fans at large have fonder feelings of Singletary.

But given the events of this week, it’s time to ask questions about Singletary’s style – even though we don’t want to. At this point, 49er fans and Singletary admirers can only hope that the answers this autumn fall Singletary’s way.

*

Coffee, a third-round pick in 2009’s draft, had a nice career at Alabama and appeared to be a nice backup option to Frank Gore last season. That’s an important role, because Gore has missed a handful of games in his career. Glen got a cup of coffee as a starter early last season when Gore missed Weeks 4 and 5, but he ran for just 128 yards on 49 carries. On the season, he averaged just 2.7 yards per carry, and he faced a challenge from rookie Anthony Dixon and holdover Michael Robinson for the backup RB role this year. But during training camp, Coffee decided that he wanted to move on from football. It’s a blow to the 49ers to have a young contributor hang up his cleats, and it raises questions about whether something in San Francisco drove the 22-year-old away.

7 Comments

Filed under Fantasy Football, Football Relativity

Fantasy Football – Rookie running backs

Rookie running backs are the biggest X-factors in fantasy football drafts year after year. As more NFL teams have moved to two-RB systems, it’s become harder and harder for rookie backs to emerge as fantasy forces. But in most years, some unknown rookie runners end up being great sleepers for fantasy owners. So in this post, we’ll compare the fantasy value of rookie running backs and try to uncover some hidden gems.

To do so, we’re going to use our Football Relativity comparison, with 10 being the most impactful rookie back and one being guys who barely merit making your draft board. In the comparison, we’ll note where the tiers break and what this comparison means as you put together your draft board. Also, You can read more about Jahvid Best of the Lions, C.J. Spiller of the Bills, and Ryan Mathews of the Chargers in this post. And there’s lots more fantasy analysis in the fantasy football category here on Football Relativity.

10 – Ryan Mathews, Chargers – Mathews steps into the most fantasy-friendly situation of any rookie back. All fantasy owners know that LaDainian Tomlinson thrived in San Diego for years, and now that Tomlinson’s gone, Mathews is set up to succeed. Of course, Darren Sproles is still around to provide big plays in small doses, but as long as Mathews adjusts to the pros quickly he’ll be the guy who gets the bulk of the carries and the goal-line chances. We’ve already discussed how we’re placing Mathews on Tier 2, and that makes him by far the most valuable rookie running back. We suspect 1,200 yards and 8-10 touchdowns are in the offing.

(*Mathews is the only rookie back on Tier 2, which means he is a starting running back in 10- and 12-team leagues.)

9 – none

8 – Jahvid Best, Lions – Best slipped into the end of the first round with Detroit, with Lions head coach Jim Schwartz talking highly of Best’s big-play ability. With Kevin Smith hurt, Best could get more carries early in the season than a Sproles/Leon Washington style big-play back, and with that being the case Best has a decent amount of upside. But Detroit hasn’t been a fantasy-friendly spot for running backs in recent years, and the additions the offense has made recently seem to help the passing game more than the run game. Best can catch the ball well, which may mean he has more success via the air than the ground as a rookie. He has value, but relying on him as an every-week starter is overly optimistic. Instead, Best is an ideal No. 3 fantasy back with some upside as a rookie.

7 – C.J. Spiller, Bills – Because my wife is a Clemson grad, I’ve seen a ton of Spiller’s college career, and he’s a fine player. He’s explosive as a runner, receiver, and returner, and he can carry the load between the tackles more than some might expect. But while he was the ninth overall pick in the draft, he ended up in a terrible spot for running backs. With Fred Jackson and Marshawn Lynch around for now (though Lynch could be cut or dealt by the opening of the season), Spiller’s chances will be limited. And even if Spiller gets carries, they will be behind a below-average offensive line with a below-average quarterback. Throw in bad Buffalo weather, and it’s clear that the cards are stacked against Spiller becoming a fantasy stud as a rookie. He’s worth a shot as a No. 4 fantasy back just because he can fill in and make one big play in any given week to make him a spot starter, but expecting more out of him this season is unwise because of the morass that is the Bills offense.

7 (con’t) – Montario Hardesty, Browns – If there’s a sleeper rookie who will be available on Tier 4 who has the upside to have a Steve Slaton-type of rookie year, it’s Hardesty, a second-round pick from Tennessee who goes into a decent situation in Cleveland. While holdover Jerome Harrison finished the season strong, he hasn’t been a reliable back through his career, and so Hardesty beating him out is at least on the table. Hardesty is a big banger who will run behind a line that features standouts in OLT Joe Thomas and C Alex Mack. Keep an eye on Hardesty’s progression through training camp, and be prepared to pounce in your draft in search of a sleeper – even if you have to do so on Tier 3.

(*Best, Spiller, and Hardesty fall on Tier 3. Best is a No. 3 running back in 10- and 12-team leagues; Spiller and Hardesty are No. 4 backs in such leagues.)

6 – none

5 – Ben Tate, Texans – Tate steps into a crowded situation in Houston, where at least three backs – Slaton, Arian Foster, and the departed Ryan Moats got shots as the No. 1 back last year. Slaton and Foster are still around, but Gary Kubiak’s unwillingness to stick with one starter means that Tate could find an opening. But it’s hard to picture Tate breaking free the way Slaton did as a rookie two years ago, which means that Tate’s probably a 2-3 game option, not a guy who could start for fantasy teams for a month or more. He’s still worth a look on Tier 4, but Tate is more of a high-risk option than Hardesty.

4 – Toby Gerhardt, Vikings – Gerhardt is a big, burly back who nearly won the Heisman Trophy at Stanford last year. But now that he’s a Viking, he’s not going to be the same kind of complement to Adrian Peterson that Chester Taylor was last season. While Taylor was a good receiver who provided a different dimension than Taylor, there’s a lot more similarity between Peterson and Gerhardt. That limits Gerhardt’s fantasy upside as a rookie. Since Peterson will be the No. 1 back without question, Gerhardt looks to be a fill-in with 10 carries or less a game. Plus, Peterson figures to get the lion’s share of goal-line carries. Were Peterson to get hurt, Gerhardt’s stock would shoot up, so he’s worth drafting for that reason – especially for Peterson owners. Gerhardt is a No. 5 fantasy back whose main upside comes if Peterson misses a game.

4 (con’t) – Joe McKnight, Jets – McKnight never completely lived up to the hype at USC, but he proved to be a versatile back with breakaway ability. With the Jets, he looks to be a good complement to Shonn Greene – a la the Thomas Jones/Leon Washington combo the Jets formerly had. Having LaDainian Tomlinson around gums up the works and could take away some of McKnight’s receiving chances this year, but McKnight has enough big-play ability that he has a smidgen of fantasy potential. McKnight is more of a fill-in than a guy who can start for fantasy teams weeks in a row, but he’s still a top 50 back.

3 – Dexter McCluster, Chiefs – McCluster will play more as a slot receiver, but since some leagues may allow McCluster running back eligibility, we’ll include him in this post. McCluster is tiny but speedy, which makes him a mini-Reggie Bush type of threat. He won’t get many carries behind Thomas Jones and Jamaal Charles in Kansas City, but McCluster could end up with 40-50 catches, and if he has RB eligibility in your league that could make him a Tier 4 back. He’s a guy worth taking a shot on in the late rounds, just to see if he can find a role.

(*Tate, Gerhardt, McKnight, and McCluster fall on Tier 4. They are all No. 5 backs in 10- and 12-team leagues. For the following backs, we note what scenarios they are draftable in.)

2 – Jonathan Dwyer, Steelers – Dwyer is a sleeper for fantasy owners, but given our lack in faith in Rashard Mendenhall as a stalwart back, we are curious to see if Dwyer emerges as a complement in Pittsburgh. Dwyer had a good college career but a bad combine season, which is why he fell into the sixth round of the NFL draft. Our hunch is that Dwyer is worth a flier as a sixth back in 12- or 14-team leagues just in case he establishes a role behind or alongside Mendenhall.

1 – Anthony Dixon, 49ers – Last year, rookie Glen Coffee looked to have the backup job behind Frank Gore in San Francisco, but Coffee’s performance when Gore was out was subpar. Now Dixon, another rookie, looks to have the shot to surpass Coffee as Gore’s backup. Given Gore’s injury history, Dixon is worth grabbing, especially for Gore owners. But we don’t see a ton of fantasy upside in Dixon because of Coffee’s presence and Gore’s dominance. He’s only draftable in 12-team leagues if you own Gore.

1 (con’t) – LeGarrette Blount, Titans – Blount wasn’t drafted, but he’s worth noting because there’s an opening in Tennessee for a complement to Chris Johnson now that LenDale White is gone. Second-year man Javon Ringer will get the first shot, but Blount has enough talent to beat out Ringer for that role. Watch how things break down in training camp to see if Blount is worth a flier in large leagues with 14 teams or more.

8 Comments

Filed under Fantasy Football, Football Relativity