Category Archives: NFL trades

Should Panthers trade for Aaron Curry?

Seattle Seahawks first round draft pick Aaron ...

Aaron Curry. Image via Wikipedia

My Panthers mid-week analysis piece for National Football Authority breaks down the rumors that the Carolina Panthers may be interested in trading for Seattle OLB Aaron Curry. We also discuss TE Jeremy Shockey’s controversial comments (and his concussion), changes on special teams, and CB Chris Gamble’s return. Click here to read all about it.

8 Comments

Filed under Football Relativity, National Footbal Authority, NFL trades

Baltimore brings in Evans

Copy of Lee Evans

Lee Evans. Image via Wikipedia

The Ravens finally added a veteran wide receiver Friday by trading for Buffalo’s Lee Evans. In return, the Ravens gave the Bills a 2012 fourth-round pick. Below are some thoughts on the deal; we compare it to other trades this preseason in this post.

After cutting Derrick Mason, the Ravens lacked a veteran receiver to pair in the starting lineup across from Anquan Boldin. So instead of banking on rookies Torrey Smith and Tandon Doss to be ready to go right away, the Ravens gave up a fourth-round pick to acquire Evans from the Bills. Evans, a former first-round pick, has played all but three games in his seven-year career, and he consistently averages more than 15 yards per catch. He remains a quality deep threat, which makes him a nice complement to Boldin. Evans wasn’t going to take the Bills over the top, and as Buffalo develops youngsters Stevie Johnson, David Nelson, and Marcus Easley, moving Evans and his salary makes sense. But in Baltimore, he’s an essential piece of the puzzle who can keep the passing game viable – something that was a big question before the trade happened. Kudos to the Ravens for recognizing a hole in their lineup and moving to address it.

Leave a comment

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL trades

FR: Preseason trades

Kevin Kolb

Kevin Kolb is now a bird of a different color in Arizona. Image via Wikipedia

Once the lockout ended, an offseason of trades was compressed into just a few weeks, and during the flurry we saw several big names move. In this post, Football Relativity compares the trades in terms of significance, with the most significant trade on the 10 level and the least significant on the 1 level. We’ll update this post until the start of the regular season.

10 – Eagles trade QB Kevin Kolb to Cardinals for CB Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie and a 2012 sixth-round pick – The Cardinals locked in on Kolb as their quarterback of the future early in the offseason. He’s a West Coast-style of quarterback who gets the ball out quickly and can move around in the pocket. But Kolb has been fragile in his career, and the Cards coaching staff will have to alter their system to fit his skills. Arizona is banking heavily on Kolb, not just because what they gave up on the trade but also with a five-year, $63 million contract extension that includes $20 million in guaranteed money. It’s a high price, but the move gives Arizona hope. Now Kolb must live up to his promise. Philadelphia was able to trade a former second-rounder and get not only a second-rounder back but also acquire Rodgers-Cromartie, a former first-round pick who has played well thus far in his career. DRC fits an area of need for the Eagles, and playing across from Asante Samuel should help his development. Andy Reid got a good deal; now he must find a backup quarterback to protect against a Michael Vick injury.

9 – none

8 – none

7 – Redskins trade DT Albert Haynesworth to Patriots for 2013 fifth-round pickWe discussed this trade in this post.

6 – Bears trade TE Greg Olsen to Panthers for third-round pick – Olsen, a former first-round pick, has been pretty productive for the Bears over his career, but offensive coordinator Mike Martz doesn’t really want to feature a tight end. As ESPN’s Kevin Seifert said, it’s a choice of scheme over skills. Olsen showed in the playoffs against Seattle last season that he can be a game-changer, and now he moves to a Panthers offense that wants to feature the tight end. He’ll compete with Jeremy Shockey in the short term, but Olsen is the long-term answer at the position. Carolina recognized that and gave Olsen a four-year, $24 million extension with $10 million in guaranteed money. Olsen will help the passing game and give receivers Brandon LaFell, David Gettis and Armanti Edwards even more space to develop.

5 – Saints trade RB Reggie Bush to Dolphins for S Jonathon Amaya (undisclosed draft picks also involved) – Instead of paying Bush a major balloon payment, the Saints signed Darren Sproles and dealt Bush to Miami. The Saints have depth at running back, so they can do without Bush. Amaya brings them a backup safety who’s a special-teams ace. In Miami, Bush will have a chance to play an even bigger role than he had in New Orleans. If Bush can be the pass-catcher to pair with rookie Daniel Thomas, the Dolphins could have a nice backfield. But Bush’s inconsistency and injury problems in his NFL career make him a curious bet. Miami isn’t paying a huge price for Bush – $10 million over two years – but it’s still a risk to build their running game around him.

4 – Bengals trade WR Chad Ochocinco to Patriots for 2012 fifth-round pick and 2013 sixth-round pick – Ochocinco had fallen out of favor in Cincinnati because his play had slipped a little and his off-field antics distracted a lot. Now he goes to a Patriots team with a notoriously strong locker room. As with Haynesworth, the Patriots believe their culture can get the best out of Ochocinco’s talents. So the Pats gave up just a little to put Ochocinco outside, hoping he will provide a nice addition to Wes Welker and a young group of receivers and tight ends. It’s a bet worth taking, given the scant price. The Bengals move on to a young group of receivers that’s headlined by rookie A.J. Green but that is also surprisingly deep with talent.

4 (con’t) – Redskins trade QB Donovan McNabb to Vikings for 2012 sixth-round pick and conditional 2013 sixth-round pick – Washington paid a significant price to bring McNabb into town last year, but Mike Shanahan quickly decided that he wasn’t the answer. So they got what they could back for McNabb. Overall, the transaction is really one-sided, but at least Washington got something in return. McNabb goes to Minnesota to be the Week 1 starter, but rookie first-rounder Christian Ponder will take the job quickly. It’ll be interesting to see how McNabb reacts to becoming a backup for the first time in his career. If he plays well, he could find another starting shot, but the signs are pointing downward on his career.

4 (con’t) Bills trade WR Lee Evans to Ravens for 2012 fourth-round pick – After cutting Derrick Mason, the Ravens lacked a veteran receiver to pair in the starting lineup across from Anquan Boldin. So instead of banking on rookies Torrey Smith and Tandon Doss to be ready to go right away, the Ravens gave up a fourth-round pick to acquire Evans from the Bills. Evans, a former first-round pick, has played all but three games in his seven-year career, and he consistently averages more than 15 yards per catch. He remains a quality deep threat, which makes him a nice complement to Boldin. Evans wasn’t going to take the Bills over the top, and as Buffalo develops youngsters Stevie Johnson, David Nelson, and Marcus Easley, moving Evans and his salary makes sense. But in Baltimore, he’s an essential piece of the puzzle who can keep the passing game viable – something that was a big question before the trade happened. Kudos to the Ravens for recognizing a hole in their lineup and moving to address it.

3 – Eagles trade DT Brodrick Bunkley to Browns for 2012 fifth-round pick Broncos for conditional 2013 draft pick- After signing Cullen Jenkins, the Eagles gave up on Bunkley, a former first-round pick who was slated to make more than $5 million this season. Bunkley started from 2007-09 and played pretty well, but last year was a disappointment as he lost his starting job. Still, he has talent, and his ability to play defensive tackle in the 4-3 makes him attractive. The Eagles originally had a deal with the Browns, but Bunkley balked at reporting to Cleveland. So that trade was voided, and the Eagles dealt Bunkley to the Broncos for a conditional 2013 pick. Bunkley will help the Broncos transition to a 4-3.

3 (con’t) – Cardinals trade RB Tim Hightower to Redskins for DE Vonnie Holliday and conditional draft pick – Hightower has been a productive back in Arizona despite not having dynamic physical gifts. But after drafting Ryan Williams to pair with Beanie Wells, the Cards didn’t have a lot of carries waiting for Hightower. So they dealt him to the Redskins, where he will compete with holdover Ryan Torain and rookie Roy Helu for playing time. Hightower is more proven than those guys, and his ability to play as a third-down back should allow him to find a role. In return, the Cardinals get a draft pick that’s conditional on Hightower’s playing time in Washington along with veteran DE Vonnie Holliday, who is long in the tooth but still pretty productive entering his 14th season.

3 (con’t) – 49ers trade S Taylor Mays to Bengals for 2013 seventh-round draft pick – Mays, a former second-round pick, fell out of favor in San Francisco last year and lost all defensive playing time. He has incredible physical skills but doesn’t play instinctively enough for the Niners’ tastes. Still, the talent was worth acquiring for the Bengals, who have little depth at safety. If the Bengals can get the most out of Mays, he’ll be well worth the miniscule draft-pick cost.

2 – Broncos trade WR Jabar Gaffney to Redskins for DE Jeremy Jarmon – The Broncos were likely going to cut Gaffney, so dealing him to Washington makes sense. Jarmon, who got little playing time in Washington, fits as a 4-3 defensive end prospect, and Denver needs all the help it can get in moving to that system. Maybe the former third-round supplemental draft pick can pan out with a change of scenery. Gaffney becomes a veteran receiver who, along with Donte Stallworth, will try to find a role behind Santana Moss in Washington. But acquiring Gaffney also blocks the Redskins’ rookie receivers to some degree.

2 (con’t) – Seahawks trade CB Kelly Jennings to Bengals for DT Clinton McDonald – Jennings, a five-year vet, moved back into the starting lineup last year for 14 games and had a decent season. Still, he is little more than an average corner. The Seahawks give up on him and hope that he doesn’t emerge as a player the way Josh Wilson did after Seattle traded him last year. In Cincinnati, Jennings could emerge as a starter to replace Johnathan Joseph, and at the least he can help as a nickel or dime back. In return, the Seahawks get McDonald, a 2009 seventh-round pick who moved up from the practice squad midway through last season and became a backup for the Bengals. He’s little more than a rotation player for the Seahawks.

2 (con’t) – Packers trade FB Quinn Johnson to Titans for undisclosed draft pick – With starter Ahmard Hall suspended, the Titans dealt for Johnson, a massive fullback who didn’t truly fit the Packers’ system. With John Kuhn in place and B.J. Raji available as a massive blocker, the Pack didn’t need Johnson, so getting a future pick for him makes sense.

2 (con’t) – Jets trade S Dwight Lowery to Jaguars for conditional draft pick – The Jaguars haven’t had a ton of secondary depth lately, so even after adding Erik Coleman and Dawan Landry in free agency, more depth is needed. Lowery, who can play safety or a slot corner, should be a top-6 defensive back for the Jags, maybe more. But he was bottled up with the Jets, so trading him makes sense.

1 – Rams trade OG John Greco to Browns for a conditional 2012 seventh-round pick – Greco, a third-round pick in 2008, never found his way into the Rams lineup, playing 26 games and starting just four in his three season there. Now he gets another chance to make an impact in Cleveland.

1 (con’t) – Packers trade OG Caleb Schlauderaff to Jets for undisclosed conditional draft pick – Schlauderaff, a sixth-round pick, has an attitude but not a ton of skill. Still, if the Jets liked him in draft prep, he’s worth a look, especially with key backup Rob Turner injured. The Packers’ depth again allows them to add a future pick.

4 Comments

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL trades

Redskins give up on Haynesworth; Patriots take their shot

We’ll be creating a post on the big NFL trades tomorrow, but in the interim we discussed the Redskins’ decision to trade DT Albert Haynesworth to the Patriots. Here’s the post from National Football Authority.

Albert Haynesworth, via boston.com

5 Comments

Filed under Football Relativity, National Footbal Authority, NFL trades

Orton stuck in Bronco limbo

For the National Football Authority, some thoughts on Kyle Orton practicing with Broncos while waiting on a possible trade to the Broncos. Here’s the post.

Kyle Orton, via broncotalk.net

1 Comment

Filed under Football Relativity, National Footbal Authority, NFL trades

NFC South free-agency preview

Harvey Dahl

Falcons ORG Harvey Dahl. Image via Wikipedia

National Football Authority has spent the last two days previewing free agency for all 32 teams. I contributed to the NFC South article, discussing the Panthers’ and Falcons’ to-do lists. Click the link to read about Tony Gonzalez, Steve Smith, Charles Johnson, Tyson Clabo, Harvey Dahl, and more.

1 Comment

Filed under Football Relativity, National Footbal Authority, NFL Free Agency, NFL trades

RP: Trading for backup quarterbacks

Kevin Kolb

Trade target Kevin Kolb. Image via Wikipedia

In the midst of the NFL lockout, one rumor that won’t go away is that the Eagles are looking to deal backup QB Kevin Kolb to a team that wants to make him a starter. Kolb, who is signed to a reasonable contract and who sits behind Michael Vick on the depth chart, says he’s ready to start, and his performance in fill-in performances supports that belief. And Eagles head coach Andy Reid seems open to granting Kolb’s trade wish if the price is right.

But is this wise for the Eagles? And is trading for Kolb a good move for a quarterback needy team? Let’s do a research project to see the results other trades in which teams dealt for someone else’s backup quarterback and made him a starter.
*If  you can think of an example we forgot, leave a comment and we’ll add it in below.

2010 – Chargers trade Charlie Whitehurst and 2010 second-round pick (60th overall) to Seahawks for 2010 second-round pick (40th overall) and 2011 third-round pick – Whitehurst, a former third-round pick, was never going to surpass Philip Rivers in San Diego, but he had also fallen behind vet Billy Volek on the depth chart. So when the Seahawks wanted Whitehurst to compete for their starting job, the Bolts made the deal. The Seahawks didn’t give up as much as other teams had for QBs they knew would start for them, but it was a fairly hefty price for an unproven backup. In his first year in Seattle, Whitehurst couldn’t beat out veteran Matt Hasselbeck, and he started just two games. While his numbers weren’t great, he did lead the Hawks to a Week 17 victory over St. Louis to clinch a playoff spot. Hasselbeck is now a free agent, and the Seahawks want to keep him, which speaks to Whitehurst’s current value. But the jury is still out on whether Seattle got what it paid for in this deal.

2009 – Patriots trade Matt Cassel and LB Mike Vrabel to Chiefs for second-round pick (34th overall) – Cassel, who had been a backup at USC and with the Patriots, got his chance to play in 2008 when Tom Brady suffered a season-ending injury in Week 1. Cassel acquited himself well, to the point that the Patriots put the franchise tag on him after the season. That was really a move to protect his value, and New England soon traded Cassel to Kansas City for an early second-round pick. That was a pretty nice return on investement for the Pats, who were obviously going to turn back to Brady as their starter. Cassel struggled a bit in his first year as a starter, but he really came on in 2010 to show he can be at least an above-average NFL starting QB. At this point, K.C. has to be thrilled to have Cassel, even after paying a hefty price.

2007 – Falcons trade Matt Schaub and 2007 10th overall pick to Texans for 2007 8th overall pick, 2007 second-round pick, and 2008 second-round pick – This is the one example that worked out far better for the team acquiring the backup quarterback. Schaub had started two games behind Michael Vick in Atlanta before the Falcons were able to get a pretty nice ransom for the former fourth-round pick. Schaub went on to the Texans, where he supplaned disappointing No. 1 overal pick David Carr. Schaub has developed into a prolific passer and has started every game when healthy over the past four seasons. The Falcons, meanwhile, didn’t know that their first season without Schaub would also be their first season without Vick, whose legal troubles began that year. So under first-year head coach Bobby Petrino, Atlanta started a poo-poo platter of Joey Harrington, Chris Redman, and Byron Leftwich that season. Petrino bailed and went to Arkansas, and the Falcons ended up drafting Matt Ryan as their new franchise QB. Atlanta bounced back from this trade, but it was as disastrous at first for the Falcons as it was shrewd for the Texans.

2004 – Eagles trade A.J. Feeley to Dolphins for 2005 second-round pick – Andy Reid learned from Ron Wolf, the GM of the team he had been an assistant coach for, when it came to trading quarterbacks. So once Donovan McNabb was an established starter, Reid dealt third-stringer Feeley to the Dolphins for a pretty high price – a second-rounder. Feeley had been a fifth-round pick, but when McNabb and backup Koy Detmer were injured in 2002, Feeley went 4-1 as a starter, helping the Eagles land a playoff berth. He was stuck on the bench another year before the Dolphins anted up to get him. But Feeley started just eight games in Miami and played poorly, losing the starting job to Jay Fiedler as coach Dave Wannstedt got forced out. Within two years, Feeley was gone. The Eagles, meanwhile, got WR Reggie Brown out of the deal as a draft pick, and actually got Feeley back as a backup a few years later. Philly won in this deal, and Miami definitely lost.

2001 – Packers trade Matt Hasselbeck plus 2001 17th overall pick and seventh-round pick to Seahawks for 2001 10th overall pick and third-round pick – Hasselbeck was the third Packers backup under Brett Favre who was traded to become a starter elsewhere, and he was the most valuable. For one, GM Wolf had built up the value of his backups enough to show that they were worthwhile investments for trading partners. Plus, the Seahawks made the trade under GM/coach Mike Holmgren, who had been in Green Bay when Hasselbeck was drafted in 1998. Hasselbeck was a sixth-round pick who developed into a preseason star in Green Bay, but he was never going to get a chance to start with Favre in place. So he moved on to Seattle. It took a while for Hasselbeck to beat out Trent Dilfer for the starting job in Seattle, but Hasselbeck eventually developed into a three-time Pro Bowler who led the Seahawks to several playoff berths and one Super Bowl. The fact that Seattle lost just one draft pick (a third-rounder) while giving up a few spots in the first round was a solid investment. Both teams came out of this deal as winners.

2000 – Packers trade Aaron Brooks and TE Lamont Hall to Saints for 2001 third-round pick and LB K.D. Williams – Brooks was the Packers’ third-string quarterback as a fourth-round pick out of Virginia, but after a year Ron Wolf was able to deal him to New Orleans for a third-rounder. The move was worthwhile for the Saints, as Brooks became a starter his first year and ended up starting 82 games for the team. Meanwhile, the Pack once again took advantage of Favre’s durability and turned a backup quarterback into a better pick than the one it had spent on him. So this deal was another win-win.

1999 – Broncos trade Jeff Lewis to Panthers for 1999 third-round pick and 2000 fourth-round pick – The Panthers, looking for a franchise quarterback, dealt for Lewis, who was a former fourth-round draft pick who was backing up John Elway in Denver. But Lewis couldn’t beat out veteran Steve Beuerlein in Carolina. Lewis was a backup for two years, in part because of a severe knee injury, getting only nominal playing time after the Panthers were eliminated from the playoff chase in 2000. And after George Seifert cut Beuerlein following the 2000 season to clear the way for Lewis, he fell flat on his face and was released at the end of training camp. The Panthers, led by rookie Chris Weinke, fell to 1-15 in 2001. The Broncos, meanwhile, dealt Lewis at the top of his value, because they already knew that Brian Griese had surpassed Lewis on the depth chart. After Elway’s retirement in 1999, Griese surpassed Bubby Brister and became a four-year starter for Denver. Denver fared fine in this trade, but it was a disaster for the Panthers.
(The short-lived Lewis era was when I covered the Panthers. Two funny stories: First, Lewis referred to himself as No. 8, leading reporters to joke that he was the first athlete to talk about himself not in the third person but the fourth person. Secondly, when Lewis saw a group of out-of-shape reporters going to play basketball during training camp, he looked at them and said, “Don’t blow a knee,” pointing back to the basketball injury that had derailed his career. It was the only time we saw a sense of humor from Lewis.)

1995 – Packers trade Mark Brunell to Jaguars for 1995 third-round pick and 1995 fifth-round pick – Brunell, who had spent two years backing up Brett Favre in Green Bay, was Jacksonville’s choice as their franchise quarterback for their first season, despite the fact that he had thrown just 27 NFL passes. It was a great move for the Jags, who got a three-time Pro Bowler for a very reasonable price. The Packers, meanwhile, had figured out that starter Favre was not just a Pro Bowl player but also an iron man who wouldn’t miss any time. So Wolf turned Brunell, a former fifth-round pick, into third- and fifth-round picks. The deal ended up as a win-win for both sides.

6 Comments

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL trades

Palmer’s plan

Carson Palmer under center against the Pittsbu...

Image via Wikipedia

Last week, we created a post about quarterbacks who might be available on the open market this offseason. Over the weekend, reports emerged that added Bengals QB Carson Palmer’s name to the list. Palmer demanded a trade from the Bengals, threatening to retire if he isn’t.

Given that demand, we thought we’d look at Palmer’s worth and who he might be an answer for.

Palmer, the top overall pick in the 2003 draft, has been a seven-year starter for the Bengals. He’s played well at times, but since he suffered a torn ACL in the playoffs following the 2005 season, he hasn’t played at the same level. This season, he threw 20 interceptions but also threw 26 touchdowns, and his play after Terrell Owens and Chad Ochocinco were out for the year, he played better down the stretch.

The Bengals say that they won’t trade Palmer and won’t even listen to offers, and owner/GM Mike Brown is just stubborn enough to make that statement stick. But if Palmer threatens to retire – which is his only real leverage, given that he is under contract till 2014 – the Bengals may have no choice to back down. That could be awkward, because Carson’s younger brother Jordan is the Bengals’ backup right now.

Palmer is no longer an elite quarterback, but he’s still able to play at an above-average level. In a vacuum, that means he’s worth a price just below what the Eagles got for Donovan McNabb last season – a second-round and fourth-round pick. While a team in desperate need of a quarterback might be willing to pay that reasonable price, taking on Palmer’s high-ticket contract for the next four seasons is going to be untenable for most teams.

So that high price, plus the Bengals’ stubbornness, makes a Palmer deal look unlikely. And that means for Palmer’s plan to come true, he must play hardball and make retirement look more like reality than an attempt for leverage.

1 Comment

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency, NFL Holdouts, NFL trades

Quarterback problems for 2011

Can Colt McCoy be the answer to the Browns' QB problems?

As a companion to our piece on potential quarterback solutions for 2011, we’re breaking down the NFL teams that face quarterback problems in the coming season. We’ll analyze what the problem is and what kind of quarterback might be a solution. Teams are listed alphabetically.

Arizona Cardinals – The Cardinals fell off the map this season in part because of horrific quarterback play. Derek Anderson, who got a three-year contract in the offseason, proved to be far too mistake-prone to balance out his strong arm, while rookies John Skelton (a late-round pick) and Max Hall (who was undrafted) proved they are not ready for prime time. Hall or Skelton (or both) could still develop, but the Cardinals have to upgrade from Anderson in the veteran department in case that development remains slow. Suggestion: Add a competitive veteran

Buffalo Bills – The Bills may have at least a short-term answer at quarterback in Ryan Fitzpatrick, who threw for 3,000 yards and 23 touchdowns in 13 starts this year. So the Bills’ best move is to add a mid-round draft pick who could develop into a starting-quality guy in 2-3 years. Suggestion: Add a developmental rookie

Carolina Panthers – Matt Moore plummeted from late bloomer to mere backup, so he’ll be allowed to leave via free agency this offseason. The real question for the Panthers, then, is whether Jimmy Clausen is a potential quarterback answer. Clausen has talent but hasn’t been able to perform when put under pressure. The new coaching staff must decide whether Clausen will grow in that area or not. And with Andrew Luck returning to school, the Panthers probably don’t have the luxury of taking a chance on a rookie quarterback with the first overall pick. So the move right now is to add a competitive veteran, or at least a placeholding veteran, and make Clausen develop enough to win the job outright. If he can’t do so this year, then it’s time to start completely over. Suggestion: Add a competitive or a placeholding veteran

Cleveland Browns – The Browns got a promising performance from rookie Colt McCoy last season, and Jake Delhomme is still around. While we still question whether McCoy can be a long-term answer, the Browns’ best move at this point is to add a competitive veteran and see if McCoy can really seize the job. Suggestion: Add a competitive veteran

Miami Dolphins – Chad Henne had a bad year, losing his job at one point and struggling at many points. And Chad Pennington and Tyler Thigpen are both free agents. The Dolphins can’t go into the season depending on Henne alone. Suggestion: Add a competitive veteran

Minnesota Vikings – After the Brett Favre experiment went 1-for-2, the Vikings have to start over at quarterback. Tarvaris Jackson is a free agent, and Joe Webb, while promising, is merely a developmental prospect. The Vikings need to add franchise quarterback of the future this offseason if possible, and then bring in a placeholder veteran to serve as starter during the youngster’s development. Suggestion: Add an elite rookie and a placeholder veteran

Oakland Raiders – New head coach Hue Jackson’s mission is likely to turn Jason Campbell into a winner, but with Bruce Gradkowski a free agent, the Raiders may want to add a competitive veteran to ensure Campbell doesn’t collapse. Keeping Gradkowski would suffice. Suggestion: Keep Gradkowski or add a competitive veteran

Philadelphia Eagles – The Eagles are deep at quarterback with Michael Vick, Kevin Kolb, and developmental 2010 rookie Mike Kafka, so their problem is an embarrasment of riches that leads to future planning questions. Vick is a free agent, but there’s no way the Eagles let him leave the nest. The question is whether to keep Kolb or get a ransom of draft picks for him. That largely depends on how advanced Kafka is, which is a question only those who have seen him in practice can answer. So the safest move is to re-sign Vick and keep Kolb for one more year. Suggestion: Keep Vick

San Francisco 49ers – The Niners vacillitated between Alex Smith and Troy Smith last year, and now both are free agents. If they can bring in a veteran like Matt Hasselbeck or Donovan McNabb, that would be the ultimate move. If not, they need to add a young prospect and a veteran who can play well enough to force the prospect to take the job instead of merely having it handed it him. Suggestion: Bring in a starter

Seattle Seahawks – Matt Hasselbeck is a free agent, and given the Seahawks’ investment in Charlie Whitehurst in the offseason, it’s hard to see them giving Hasselbeck a multiyear contract to stay as their starter. We believe the best investment is to let Hasselbeck leave and bring in a cheaper veteran to compete with Whitehurst, who played well in his final start of the 2010 season. Suggestion: Add a competitive veteran to replace Hasselbeck

Tennessee Titans – The Titans want Vince Young out of town, and veteran backup Kerry Collins is a free agent. Rusty Smith struggled terribly in his lone rookie start, which means he’s nothing more than a development project right now. The time is now for the Titans to add a high-round rookie and a veteran to mentor him. Collins could serve as that mentor if the Titans want to keep him around. Suggestion: Add an elite rookie and a placeholder veteran

Washington Redskins – Rex Grossman is a free agent, and Donovan McNabb is under contract but out of favor. Ironically, the Redskins’ best move is to let McNabb go and keep Grossman, while adding a rookie who can develop into a starter. Redskins ownership will have to fall on their swords and admit bringing McNabb in was a mistake for this to happen, but wisdom dictates they must do so. Suggestion: Re-sign Grossman, trade McNabb, draft a developmental rookie

1 Comment

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency, NFL trades

Quarterback solutions for 2011

Matt Hasselbeck of the Seattle Seahawks

Matt Hasselbeck. Image via Wikipedia

We’ll take a brief break from our playoff coverage to try and give some hope to the teams who landed outside of the final four. To do this, we’re going to break down the quarterbacks who may be available to switch teams this offseason. We’re going to break them down by categories so that you can see just how likely it is that your favorite team can land each guy.

If you have ideas of great matches between a quarterback and a team, leave them in the comments below, and we’ll talk about it.

We’ve also created a post of teams with quarterback needs to help you play a matching game.

Unrestricted Free Agents (Free to sign anywhere)
Peyton Manning, Michael Vick, Matt Hasselbeck, Kerry Collins, Alex Smith, Marc Bulger, Rex Grossman, Billy Volek, Seneca Wallace, Chad Pennington, Luke McCown, Charlie Frye, J.P. Losman, Kyle Boller, Patrick Ramsey

First of all, cross Manning and Vick off your list. The Colts and Eagles will not let these franchise quarterbacks leave via free agency, unless something incredibly screwy happens with the new CBA (whenever it is signed). While Manning and Vick are unrealistic pipe dreams, the other guys on this list are on the market. Hasselbeck’s strong postseason play for the Seahawks likely increased his price tag, and he’s likely in line for a multi-year deal now, which may price him out of Seattle given the team’s investment in Charlie Whitehurst. The Seahawks say they want to keep Hasselbeck, but will they be willing to pay him $15 million-plus as a franchise player? We can’t buy that. Therefore, our hunch is that Hasselbeck is the one 2011 starter who could step in somewhere else – especially somewhere with a West Coast type of scheme like Minnesota or Cleveland – and provide an upgrade immediately. Collins and Bulger, both of whom were backups this year, are more of stopgap options. Collins played some in Tennessee with mixed results, while Bulger got a break from the beating he took in St. Louis by sitting behind Joe Flacco in Baltimore. Neither is a long-term answer, but both could provide competition for an average quarterback or serve as a placeholding starter for a team developing a young QB. Smith is the wild card of this group. He has talent, but it never worked out in San Francisco. But some team might choose to invest and take a look to see if he can step up his play in a more stable situation. Grossman is in the perfect situation in Washington because he’s been with offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan longer than Donovan McNabb and seems to be favored over the higher profile QB. If Grossman wants another shot to start, now’s the time to leave after a solid end-of-season performance, but his best chance to succeed and maybe to start is with the Redskins. Volek showed flashes of ability in Tennessee years ago, and he could be a stopgap in Carolina, where the new coach and offensive coordinator saw him practice in San Diego. Wallace is a decent backup who can run the West Coast offense and also move around a bit, but aside from Cleveland president Mike Holmgren, few NFL types see him as more than a No. 3. Pennington was once a quality starter, but his shoulder’s in such bad shape that he’s just a No. 3 at this point. The other guys on this list are not starters but could provide some veteran assurance for a team looking for a third guy.

Limbo Free Agents (Players with four or five years of service who would be unrestricted free agents in a system like 2009 or before but not under the 2010 system)
Tarvaris Jackson (5), Bruce Gradkowski (5), Matt Leinart (5), Kellen Clemens (5), Brodie Croyle (5),  Drew Stanton (4), Tyler Thigpen (4), Matt Moore (4), Trent Edwards (4), Troy Smith (4)

These players may or may not be unrestricted free agents, and all are risky. Gradkowski has had the most success as a starter, making up for physical limitations with gutty play, and it appears he’s not a favorite of Al Davis in Raiderland. He could be a decent stopgap somewhere. Leinart never lived up to his billing in Arizona, but we could see him getting one more shot to compete somewhere. Jackson had his moments in Minnesota, but he was never consistent, and the Vikings have decided he’s not their quarterback of the future. Clemens showed some promise with the Jets before getting stuck, first behind Brett Favre and then behind Mark Sanchez. A change of scenery should provide a better opportunity than he’s had in three years. Croyle is nothing more than a backup. Thigpen had a long chance in Kansas City and a brief chance for the Dolphins this year, but his win/loss record is abysmal. Still, he may be a guy a team wants to bring in as a competitor for a starting job. Stanton had shown little promise until this year in Detroit, where injuries to Matthew Stafford and Shaun Hill forced him into action. Stanton played well enough to at least move up from a No. 3 quarterback to a backup, and perhaps even enter a competitive environment. Moore and Edwards have had shots to start in Carolina and Buffalo, respectively, but both lost their jobs. They’re likely to fill in as backups instead of a starting candidates. Smith showed some spark in San Francisco this year, but he looks to be an energetic backup who can step up in a pinch instead of an every-week starter.

Restricted Free Agents (Players with three years experience who could move teams via offer sheet)
Dennis Dixon, Brian Brohm

Dixon, the Steelers’ backup, has had a couple of starting shots and has played OK. He’s not great, but someone might be enamored with his potential. If the Steelers don’t place a high tender on Dixon, he could be targeted. Brohm was a higher draft pick than Dixon, so an offer sheet is more unlikely. His Buffalo tenure has been uneventful.

Trade (These players are under contract in 2011)
Vince Young, Donovan McNabb, Kevin Kolb, Matt Flynn, Kyle Orton – UPDATE: Carson Palmer?

These names are more speculative, but they’re likely to be targeted to some degree or another. The Titans definitely want to be rid of Young, and if they can’t trade him, they’ll release him. At some point, some team will give up a late-round pick to get an exclusive shot at rehabilitating a former top-3 pick who has a winning record as a starter. McNabb may draw some interest as well, although he’s clearly in his decline phase and isn’t worth more than a mid-round pick. But with just one year left on his contract, don’t be shocked to see McNabb shopped. Like McNabb, Orton signed a one-year extension during the season, only to see the starting job go to a younger player during the year. Since Tim Tebow is longer for Denver than Orton is, the Broncos might consider dealing Orton at the right price – likely a mid-round pick. It’s unlikely that the Packers will deal Flynn, but after his solid debut start against the Patriots late this season he’ll be a dream answer for teams looking for a young starter. If the price gets high enough, the Packers might make a move. But the cream of this crop is Kolb, who has one year remaining on his contract at a reasonable price. Certainly, the Eagles would prefer to keep Kolb to back up Vick, whose versatile style exposes him to more of an injury risk than other QBs. But if the Eagles were offered a first-round pick, they’d have to consider trading Kolb and letting young prospect Mike Kafka step in as their backup. That’s a move that Andy Reid’s mentor Mike Holmgren used time after time in Green Bay to build draft equity. Kolb has shown enough in his starting stints to be considered an average NFL starter right away with the promise to emerge into even more.

7 Comments

Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency, NFL trades