Monthly Archives: July 2011

Can Philly work its magic to revive Vince Young’s career?

For the National Football Authority, we discuss whether QB Vince Young’s career can be revived in Philadelphia like Michael Vick’s was. Click here to go to the story to find out what’s wrong with Young, what signs of hope there are, and what skill the Eagles can help him with most.

Vince Young, via allthingsphillysports

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Braylon Edwards now a bargain

For National Football Authority, we look at the wide receiver market and discuss how ex-Jets receiver Braylon Edwards has moved into bargain territory. Click here to find out why.

Braylon Edwards, via thepigskindoctors.com

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Jaguars spend big to upgrade defense

In my latest post for the National Football Authority, we discuss the Jaguars’ plan of attack to beat their defensive back seven by adding LBs Paul Posluszny and Clint Session, S Dawan Landry, and CB Drew Coleman in free agency. You can check out the story here.

Paul Posluszny

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Eagles swoop in for Asomugha

Nnamdi Asomugha

New Eagle Nnamdi Asomugha. Image via Wikipedia

The best free agent on the market pulled the biggest shocker Friday night, as CB Nnamdi Asomugha signed a five-year, $60 million deal with the Eagles that includes $25 million in guaranteed money. The Eagles weren’t one of the teams rumored to be in pursuit of Asomugha – the Jets, Cowboys, Texans, and 49ers all let their interest be known – but Philly swooped in at the last minute to land the All-Pro corner by making the ex-Raider the highest paid CB in the league once again. Below are some thoughts on what Asomugha means to the Eagles and their title chances.

Asomugha is one of the few cornerbacks whose coverage is so good that he dissuades quarterbacks from even throwing his way. So while his stats don’t look great, his impact is great. (Check out Pro Football Reference’s Approximate Value stat (AV) to get a sense of that impact.) Asomugha isn’t afraid to get physical as a tackler, either, which sets him apart from incumbent Eagle Asante Samuel and acquisition Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, who came over from Arizona in the Kevin Kolb trade. At the moment, the Eagles have a ridiculous CB trio, which has led to speculation of a trade, but if they keep all three corners they’ll be set up to challenge even the Packers’ multiple WR sets. Now new defensive coordinator Juan Castillo (coaching defense for the first time) must figure out how to deploy his CB toys in a way that makes the most of the talents of all three. It remains to be seen how well the Eagles can do so, but there’s little doubt their roster is now among the most talented in the league. By adding Asomugha and DRC, as well as pass rusher Jason Babin, the Eagles are looking to return to the scare factor their defense had in the Jim Johnson days. And on paper, the scare is there.

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FR: Preseason trades

Kevin Kolb

Kevin Kolb is now a bird of a different color in Arizona. Image via Wikipedia

Once the lockout ended, an offseason of trades was compressed into just a few weeks, and during the flurry we saw several big names move. In this post, Football Relativity compares the trades in terms of significance, with the most significant trade on the 10 level and the least significant on the 1 level. We’ll update this post until the start of the regular season.

10 – Eagles trade QB Kevin Kolb to Cardinals for CB Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie and a 2012 sixth-round pick – The Cardinals locked in on Kolb as their quarterback of the future early in the offseason. He’s a West Coast-style of quarterback who gets the ball out quickly and can move around in the pocket. But Kolb has been fragile in his career, and the Cards coaching staff will have to alter their system to fit his skills. Arizona is banking heavily on Kolb, not just because what they gave up on the trade but also with a five-year, $63 million contract extension that includes $20 million in guaranteed money. It’s a high price, but the move gives Arizona hope. Now Kolb must live up to his promise. Philadelphia was able to trade a former second-rounder and get not only a second-rounder back but also acquire Rodgers-Cromartie, a former first-round pick who has played well thus far in his career. DRC fits an area of need for the Eagles, and playing across from Asante Samuel should help his development. Andy Reid got a good deal; now he must find a backup quarterback to protect against a Michael Vick injury.

9 – none

8 – none

7 – Redskins trade DT Albert Haynesworth to Patriots for 2013 fifth-round pickWe discussed this trade in this post.

6 – Bears trade TE Greg Olsen to Panthers for third-round pick – Olsen, a former first-round pick, has been pretty productive for the Bears over his career, but offensive coordinator Mike Martz doesn’t really want to feature a tight end. As ESPN’s Kevin Seifert said, it’s a choice of scheme over skills. Olsen showed in the playoffs against Seattle last season that he can be a game-changer, and now he moves to a Panthers offense that wants to feature the tight end. He’ll compete with Jeremy Shockey in the short term, but Olsen is the long-term answer at the position. Carolina recognized that and gave Olsen a four-year, $24 million extension with $10 million in guaranteed money. Olsen will help the passing game and give receivers Brandon LaFell, David Gettis and Armanti Edwards even more space to develop.

5 – Saints trade RB Reggie Bush to Dolphins for S Jonathon Amaya (undisclosed draft picks also involved) – Instead of paying Bush a major balloon payment, the Saints signed Darren Sproles and dealt Bush to Miami. The Saints have depth at running back, so they can do without Bush. Amaya brings them a backup safety who’s a special-teams ace. In Miami, Bush will have a chance to play an even bigger role than he had in New Orleans. If Bush can be the pass-catcher to pair with rookie Daniel Thomas, the Dolphins could have a nice backfield. But Bush’s inconsistency and injury problems in his NFL career make him a curious bet. Miami isn’t paying a huge price for Bush – $10 million over two years – but it’s still a risk to build their running game around him.

4 – Bengals trade WR Chad Ochocinco to Patriots for 2012 fifth-round pick and 2013 sixth-round pick – Ochocinco had fallen out of favor in Cincinnati because his play had slipped a little and his off-field antics distracted a lot. Now he goes to a Patriots team with a notoriously strong locker room. As with Haynesworth, the Patriots believe their culture can get the best out of Ochocinco’s talents. So the Pats gave up just a little to put Ochocinco outside, hoping he will provide a nice addition to Wes Welker and a young group of receivers and tight ends. It’s a bet worth taking, given the scant price. The Bengals move on to a young group of receivers that’s headlined by rookie A.J. Green but that is also surprisingly deep with talent.

4 (con’t) – Redskins trade QB Donovan McNabb to Vikings for 2012 sixth-round pick and conditional 2013 sixth-round pick – Washington paid a significant price to bring McNabb into town last year, but Mike Shanahan quickly decided that he wasn’t the answer. So they got what they could back for McNabb. Overall, the transaction is really one-sided, but at least Washington got something in return. McNabb goes to Minnesota to be the Week 1 starter, but rookie first-rounder Christian Ponder will take the job quickly. It’ll be interesting to see how McNabb reacts to becoming a backup for the first time in his career. If he plays well, he could find another starting shot, but the signs are pointing downward on his career.

4 (con’t) Bills trade WR Lee Evans to Ravens for 2012 fourth-round pick – After cutting Derrick Mason, the Ravens lacked a veteran receiver to pair in the starting lineup across from Anquan Boldin. So instead of banking on rookies Torrey Smith and Tandon Doss to be ready to go right away, the Ravens gave up a fourth-round pick to acquire Evans from the Bills. Evans, a former first-round pick, has played all but three games in his seven-year career, and he consistently averages more than 15 yards per catch. He remains a quality deep threat, which makes him a nice complement to Boldin. Evans wasn’t going to take the Bills over the top, and as Buffalo develops youngsters Stevie Johnson, David Nelson, and Marcus Easley, moving Evans and his salary makes sense. But in Baltimore, he’s an essential piece of the puzzle who can keep the passing game viable – something that was a big question before the trade happened. Kudos to the Ravens for recognizing a hole in their lineup and moving to address it.

3 – Eagles trade DT Brodrick Bunkley to Browns for 2012 fifth-round pick Broncos for conditional 2013 draft pick- After signing Cullen Jenkins, the Eagles gave up on Bunkley, a former first-round pick who was slated to make more than $5 million this season. Bunkley started from 2007-09 and played pretty well, but last year was a disappointment as he lost his starting job. Still, he has talent, and his ability to play defensive tackle in the 4-3 makes him attractive. The Eagles originally had a deal with the Browns, but Bunkley balked at reporting to Cleveland. So that trade was voided, and the Eagles dealt Bunkley to the Broncos for a conditional 2013 pick. Bunkley will help the Broncos transition to a 4-3.

3 (con’t) – Cardinals trade RB Tim Hightower to Redskins for DE Vonnie Holliday and conditional draft pick – Hightower has been a productive back in Arizona despite not having dynamic physical gifts. But after drafting Ryan Williams to pair with Beanie Wells, the Cards didn’t have a lot of carries waiting for Hightower. So they dealt him to the Redskins, where he will compete with holdover Ryan Torain and rookie Roy Helu for playing time. Hightower is more proven than those guys, and his ability to play as a third-down back should allow him to find a role. In return, the Cardinals get a draft pick that’s conditional on Hightower’s playing time in Washington along with veteran DE Vonnie Holliday, who is long in the tooth but still pretty productive entering his 14th season.

3 (con’t) – 49ers trade S Taylor Mays to Bengals for 2013 seventh-round draft pick – Mays, a former second-round pick, fell out of favor in San Francisco last year and lost all defensive playing time. He has incredible physical skills but doesn’t play instinctively enough for the Niners’ tastes. Still, the talent was worth acquiring for the Bengals, who have little depth at safety. If the Bengals can get the most out of Mays, he’ll be well worth the miniscule draft-pick cost.

2 – Broncos trade WR Jabar Gaffney to Redskins for DE Jeremy Jarmon – The Broncos were likely going to cut Gaffney, so dealing him to Washington makes sense. Jarmon, who got little playing time in Washington, fits as a 4-3 defensive end prospect, and Denver needs all the help it can get in moving to that system. Maybe the former third-round supplemental draft pick can pan out with a change of scenery. Gaffney becomes a veteran receiver who, along with Donte Stallworth, will try to find a role behind Santana Moss in Washington. But acquiring Gaffney also blocks the Redskins’ rookie receivers to some degree.

2 (con’t) – Seahawks trade CB Kelly Jennings to Bengals for DT Clinton McDonald – Jennings, a five-year vet, moved back into the starting lineup last year for 14 games and had a decent season. Still, he is little more than an average corner. The Seahawks give up on him and hope that he doesn’t emerge as a player the way Josh Wilson did after Seattle traded him last year. In Cincinnati, Jennings could emerge as a starter to replace Johnathan Joseph, and at the least he can help as a nickel or dime back. In return, the Seahawks get McDonald, a 2009 seventh-round pick who moved up from the practice squad midway through last season and became a backup for the Bengals. He’s little more than a rotation player for the Seahawks.

2 (con’t) – Packers trade FB Quinn Johnson to Titans for undisclosed draft pick – With starter Ahmard Hall suspended, the Titans dealt for Johnson, a massive fullback who didn’t truly fit the Packers’ system. With John Kuhn in place and B.J. Raji available as a massive blocker, the Pack didn’t need Johnson, so getting a future pick for him makes sense.

2 (con’t) – Jets trade S Dwight Lowery to Jaguars for conditional draft pick – The Jaguars haven’t had a ton of secondary depth lately, so even after adding Erik Coleman and Dawan Landry in free agency, more depth is needed. Lowery, who can play safety or a slot corner, should be a top-6 defensive back for the Jags, maybe more. But he was bottled up with the Jets, so trading him makes sense.

1 – Rams trade OG John Greco to Browns for a conditional 2012 seventh-round pick – Greco, a third-round pick in 2008, never found his way into the Rams lineup, playing 26 games and starting just four in his three season there. Now he gets another chance to make an impact in Cleveland.

1 (con’t) – Packers trade OG Caleb Schlauderaff to Jets for undisclosed conditional draft pick – Schlauderaff, a sixth-round pick, has an attitude but not a ton of skill. Still, if the Jets liked him in draft prep, he’s worth a look, especially with key backup Rob Turner injured. The Packers’ depth again allows them to add a future pick.

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The league’s next great defense?

For National Football Authority, I discuss how the Redskins have a great plan for building their defense and how they’re executing the plan well in free agency (Barry Cofield, Stephen Bowen, and Josh Wilson) and through the draft (Ryan Kerrigan). Here’s the link.

Underrated CB Josh Wilson, courtesy gridironfans.com

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Redskins give up on Haynesworth; Patriots take their shot

We’ll be creating a post on the big NFL trades tomorrow, but in the interim we discussed the Redskins’ decision to trade DT Albert Haynesworth to the Patriots. Here’s the post from National Football Authority.

Albert Haynesworth, via boston.com

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