Daily Archives: June 8, 2011

RP: What’s next for Terrelle Pryor?

O'Brien Schofield chases Terrelle Pryor

Terrelle Pryor is on the move. Image via Wikipedia

Terrelle Pryor ended his Ohio State career on Tuesday, and the natural next question is where he will end up next. We’ve done some research looking at his options to see what his best path to being an NFL starting QB may be.

NFL Supplemental Draft

Pryor’s lawyer has already indicated that entering the NFL supplemental draft would be his preference. This is a little dicey in the midst of a lockout; while the CBA provides for a supplemental draft in a lockout, just as it did for a draft, none is currently scheduled. And with no opportunity to join a team immediately, being a supplemental draft pick could be even more tenuous than usual.

Amazingly, there have been just five quarterbacks taken in the supplemental draft since it began in 1977, and all five were first round picks. One, Bernie Kosar going to the Browns in 1985, was an unqualified success. The others – Dave Wilson to Saints in 1981, Timm Rosenbach to the Cardinals and Steve Walsh to the Cowboys in 1989, and Dave Brown to the Giants in 1992 – didn’t work out for player or team.

It’s hard to picture Pryor as a first-round pick, because even though he’s talented he has not been a consistent passer in his three years at Ohio State. But NFL Films’ Greg Cosell said he had heard Pryor connected with the first round. Would a team that needs a QB of the future (the Redskins come immediately to mind) take a shot at Pryor with an early-round pick? We could certainly see that happening.

The supplemental draft works like this: teams must submit “blind” bids on players – basically an email that indicates they would spend a certain round pick on the player. The winning team is the team that bids the earliest round, with ties broken by 2010 record. The winning team surrenders a 2012 pick in the equivalent round. Under this system, we could see Pryor being at least a third-round pick, and a team that falls in love with Pryor could take no chances and would have to spend an even higher pick to lock him up.

If Pryor were to enter the supplemental draft, 2011 would likely be a lost year, but he could be attractive to a team as a developmental project.

UFL

The UFL is only two years old, and only three QBs – J.P. Losman, Chris Greisen, and Richard Bartel – have moved from the minor league to the NFL. But the strategy has worked with other minor leagues – for example, Tommy Maddox used strong play in the XFL to become the Steelers’ starting quarterback. Playing the short UFL season would also lessen Pryor’s injury risk and potentially make him available to the NFL late in the 2011 season. Plus, several of the UFL teams are coached by ex-NFL head coaches. A good word from Marty Schottenheimer, Dennis Green, or Jim Fassel would make Pryor more marketable to the NFL, and spending time with such coaches would help Pryor’s development immensely. The UFL salary won’t be much, but the opportunity could be attractive to Pryor.

CFL

The CFL style of game favors running quarterbacks, so Pryor could absolutely tear up that league with his physical gifts. Could one amazing year in Canada set him up to move to the NFL? The path has been taken before – Warren Moon, Jeff Garcia, Doug Flutie, Joe Theismann, Erik Kramer, Joe Piscarcik, Sean Salisbury, and Dieter Brock are all quarterbacks who parlayed CFL success into an NFL shot. Moon, Theismann, and Garcia all turned those shots into significant success. (Props to this site for the CFL to NFL research.)

But the CFL season is an 18-game grind, and so playing there would present far more injury risk than the UFL. And most CFL contracts do not allow players to jump to the NFL until Jan. 1, which would put Pryor a couple of months behind the UFL timetable in terms of connecting with an NFL team. For those reasons, the UFL seems like a better fit for the future – even though in the present Pryor could be an immediate star above the border.

An FCS school

Pryor couldn’t transfer to another FBS (formerly I-A) school and play in 2011, but he could go down a level and play right away. That ploy has worked to get some players into the NFL in the past – most notably Joe Flacco, a first-round pick by the Ravens. Current Vikings third-stringer Rhett Bomar (who had a similar situation to Pryor at Oklahoma) also took this route. (Here’s a great blog on Bomar and Pryor.) But given the fact that Pryor already faces a five-game NCAA suspension and the possibility that he could be ruled ineligible for the whole year. And playing 6-8 games in the UFL would probably help him more than playing an equal number of games for an FCS squad. Still, this possibility should at least be on his radar.

The bottom line

If Pryor is going to be at least a mid-round pick, he should opt for the NFL supplemental draft. But that means he will be unlikely to see the field at all in 2011, and the lockout would also keep him from cashing in right away. Finding a way to work a one-year deal in the UFL or CFL would get Pryor on the field sooner, and if he played well he could actually advance his NFL draft stock for 2012. That’s a riskier way to go, but it would be a whole lot more fun for all of us to watch.

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Filed under Football Relativity, NFL draft

Finding a Fit: Tyson Clabo

It’s time to focus on an offensive lineman in our Finding a Fit series, and as we do we’re going to focus on one of the grittiest (or should we say nastiest?) right tackles around – Atlanta’s Tyson Clabo. This is the sixth edition in a series that will continue as long as the lockout drags on. In this series, we’re going to look at free agents and try to match them to their perfect fits. We’ll consider opportunity, skill specificity, personality, and even money as we do this.

Previous Finding a Fit features focused on Matt Hasselbeck, Nnamdi Asomugha, Ray EdwardsAubrayo Franklin, and Plaxico Burress. Click through to check those out, and if you’d like to suggest a player for finding a fit, leave a comment or let us know on Twitter.

Tyson Clabo of the Falcons, via bleacherreport.com

Synopsis

Clabo, a Wake Forest product (Go Deacs!) was undrafted in 2004, and he tried to hook on with the Broncos, Giants, and Chargers before landing in Atlanta in 2005. He broke into the starting lineup in 2006 at right guard, and since then has basically been a full-time starter at right tackle. He finally earned some national recognition this past season with his first Pro Bowl trip. Along with right guard Harvey Dahl, he’s one of the “Nasty Boys,” a pairing that is physical and sometimes plays in the gray area. Clabo has become known as a solid run blocker, but he’s not as strong in pass protection at times. Still, he’s a solid starter who can add some attitude to the run game of a team that wants to be more physical.

Potential Fits

Atlanta– Obviously, Clabo fits the Falcons’ run-first philosophy. The question that will determine whether he returns is price. Dahl and fellow starting OG Justin Blalock are both free agents, and it’s unlikely the Falcons will pay to keep all three. Will Clabo or Dahl be the priority? Clabo will be an unrestricted free agent no matter what system the lockout yields, so the price tag may simply get too rich for the Falcons’ blood. Plus, the Falcons may feel they can develop a replacement such as Garrett Reynolds, and holdover Will Stivek is an acceptable stopgap. Our sense is that price will keep Atlanta from keeping a player they like.

Tampa Bay – The Buccaneers could steal a player from a division rival and fill a need at right tackle. Neither Jeremy Trueblood or James Lee is a comfortable starter, and investing in the running game could help Josh Freeman, LeGarrette Blount and company as they continue their ascension. Plus, Clabo’s  style of play would continue to help the young Bucs develop an identity.

Kansas City – The Chiefs are developing right tackle Barry Richardson, a physical specimen whose play has been inconsistent to this point. If they are frustrated with his development or want more of a sure thing to support a run-first offense, Clabo would be a nice option. Both the Falcons and Chiefs use the same Patriots style of play, so Clabo would be a fit, and he’s the kind of veteran who would be a nice addition to a young locker room. Jamaal Charles and Thomas Jones have to be rooting for the addition of a vet like Clabo.

Cleveland – The Browns have a terrific left tackle in Joe Thomas, but the right side of the line lacks talent or stability. Tony Pashos, Shawn Lauvao, and Billy Yates are all aging players with injury histories, and none provides the kind of stability that a young offense needs. And Peyton Hillis’ running style fits the kind of play Clabo has provided the Falcons in recent years. If you’re looking for a darkhorse in the Clabo race, Cleveland may be it.

Oakland– The Raiders played vets Langston Walker and Khalif Barnes at right tackle last year, but neither is a long-term answer. They hope rookie Joe Barksdale will become the right tackle of the future across from Jared Veldheer, but Clabo’s physical, nasty style could be so valuable to the Raiders that they jump into the market. Clabo plays like an old-time Raider, and owner Al Davis’ habits die hard.

Buffalo – The Bills have a massive hole at right tackle despite their serious offensive line investments in recent years, and they’ve paid top dollar for free-agent linemen in the past. But given where they are in the rebuilding process, it looks to us like they’re far more likely to develop rookie Chris Hairston than to pay big bucks for Clabo.

The Best Fits

1. Atlanta – The grass isn’t greener for Clabo on the other side of the fence. The main question is whether the money will be.

2. Kansas City – If Clabo wants to move, he should be looking for a contender that’s at least as close as the Falcons are. The Chiefs rank just above the Bucs by that criteria.

3. Cleveland – If the Browns are looking for a veteran to lead their line, Clabo fits. He’s exactly the kind of guy you want blocking in front of Peyton Hillis in bad weather.

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Filed under Finding a Fit, Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency