Monthly Archives: August 2010

Fantasy Football: Draft board changes

Vincent Jackson, a player with the San Diego C...

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We posted our Fantasy Football draft board about 10 days ago, and today we went through the board and made final changes before our drafts happen. We thought we’d share these changes and our thinking behind them.

Moving Up
RB Ryan Mathews, Chargers  – Moves up from top of Tier 2 to bottom of Tier 1. We now prefer him to Rashard Mendenhall or Cedric Benson.
RB Arian Foster, Texans – Moves from Tier 3B to bottom of Tier 2. Now a top-15 caliber fantasy back and a top-35 overall pick. Now on par with Ahmad Bradshaw on our draft board.
WR Malcom Floyd, Chargers – Moves up 13 spots overall because of Vincent Jackson’s holdout. Now on par with Dwayne Bowe on our draft board.

Moving Down
WR Sidney Rice, Vikings – Moves down because of injury that could cost him half the season. Moves to the bottom of Tier 3 as a draft-and-hold prospect.
WR Vincent Jackson, Chargers – Moves down because holdout remains in effect. Moves to the bottom of Tier 3 as a draft-and-hold prospect.
WR Brett Favre, Vikings – Moves down because of Sidney Rice’s injury. Moves from Tier 2 to Tier 3 but remains the No. 8 overall QB.

Moving On
WR Legedu Naanee, Chargers – Gains value because Vincent Jackson’s holdout isn’t resolved. Becomes a late-round flier on Tier 5.
WR Greg Camarillo, Vikings – Gains value because of trade to Vikings and Sidney Rice’s injury. Becomes a late-round flier on Tier 5.
WRs Laurent Robinson and Danny Amendola, Rams – Gain value because of Donnie Avery’s injury. Both become late-round fliers on Tier 5. We prefer Amendola slightly.
RB Kareem Hughes, Buccaneers – Gains value because he beat out Derrick Ward for backup RB job behind Cadillac Williams. Becomes a late-round flier on Tier 5.
WR Jordan Shipley, Bengals – Gains value because of Antonio Bryant’s release. Becomes a late-round flier on Tier 5.

Moving Off
WR Donnie Avery, Rams (injury)
QB Matt Leinart, Cardinals (lost job)
RB Derrick Ward, Buccaneers (cut)

Do not draft
The following players are on injured reserve and out for the year. We added them to our do not draft list.
QB: Jim Sorgi, Giants
RB: P.J. Hill, Saints
WR: Marcus Easley, Bills; Jaymar Johnson, Vikings; Kerry Meier, Falcons, Donnie Avery, Rams; Sinorice Moss, Giants; Wallace Wright, Panthers; Malcolm Kelly, Redskins
TE: Jake Nordin, Lions; Joey Haynos, Lions

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The ABCs of receiver roulette – Avery, Bryant, Coles

Laveranues Coles, Jets Wide receiver 2000–2002...

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Three major news items emerged at the wide receiver position this weekend, and we’re going to break them down like ABC. First comes Donnie Avery’s season-ending injury in St. Louis. Next comes the Bengals’ release of WR Antonio Bryant and then the Jets’ release of WR Laveranues Coles. We’ll analyze the ABCs below, both on the field and from a fantasy football perspective.

A – In St. Louis, Avery was set to become the Rams’ No. 1 receiver once again, but he tore the ACL in his right knee in the Rams’ third preseason game, which will land him on injured reserve and end his season. The injury is a big blow to the Rams, because Avery (who had 100 catches over the past two years) is the only proven receiver on the Rams’ roster. The injury not only stymies a St. Louis attack that’s bereft of playmakers; it also makes it harder for rookie QB Sam Bradford to succeed because he has so few quality targets to look for.
Fantasy impact: With Avery out, Laurent Robinson is probably the Rams’ best receiving option, with Danny Amendola close behind. Feel free to take a flier on either Ram in the final round of larger leagues, but both are long shots to make big impacts.

B – In Cincinnati, Bryant became the Bengals’ second straight free-agent bust at wide receiver, joining Laveranues Coles. (Andrew Brandt broke down the numbers well.) Bryant got a four-year, $28 million deal just four months ago, but the knee problems that plagued him last year never went away long enough for him to emerge, and when Cincinnati added Terrell Owens last month, Bryant was no longer needed despite his big contract. The miscalcuation on Bryant’s health will cost the Bengals at least $8 million guaranteed (and maybe more, depending on how an upcoming grievance is resolved), but the Bengals still have enough passing weapons with T.O., Chad Ochocinco, and rookies Jordan Shipley and Jermaine Gresham that Bryant won’t be missed on the field.
Fantasy impact: Bryant’s departure doesn’t raise the stock of Ochocinco or T.O., but it does mitigate some of the risk of both players by defining their roles more clearly. Ochocinco is a No. 2 receiver, while Owens is a No. 4. Shipley now becomes draftable as a sleeper, because his spot in the slot could help him carve out a role and some numbers. Gresham also becomes draftable in larger leagues as a top 20 tight end. Quarterback Carson Palmer’s status doesn’t change.

C – In New York, Coles’ third go-round with the Jets was grounded preemptively, and Coles claims he is done now. That may not be true, because the Jets may call Coles back after the first game so that they’re not on the hook for guaranteeing Coles’ base salary for the season. Coles’ skills really showed some decline last season in Cincinnati, and the Jets mainly wanted him as a bridge until Santonio Holmes’ four-game suspension ends. Now the Jets will rely on Braylon Edwards and Jerricho Cotchery and hope role players like David Clowney and Brad Smith emerge during the first month of the season.
Fantasy impact: Coles had no fantasy value before and still doesn’t. His absence doesn’t affect Braylon Edwards’ value but does make Jerricho Cotchery a solid flex play for the first four weeks of the season until Holmes returns to the field.

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Quarterback controversy in the cards in Arizona

Leinart at a Cardinals' practice

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Quarterback controversies seem to be rare these days, but a genuine one is brewing in Arizona. On Saturday night, the Cardinals will switch from starting Matt Leinart to give Derek Anderson a shot against the Bears in Soldier Field. Let’s analyze this competition on the field and consider its fantasy football implications.

Leinart, once the golden boy of Troy as a Heisman Trophy winner at USC, was the 10th overall pick back in 2006, and as a rookie he started 11 games and showed promise. But Kurt Warner took over at the end of that season and then seized the starting job the next year, leading the Cardinals to levels of success they haven’t ever seen. Now that Warner is retired, most assumed that Leinart would finally get the chance to start for ‘Zona. Leinart’s hallmark isn’t a big arm but accuracy, which would seem to be at a premium in a Cardinals offense that has such talented wide receivers in Larry Fitzgerald, Steve Breaston, and Early Doucet. But Leinart hasn’t shown that accuracy in the preseason, and he at this point appears almost gunshy. Now, it may not be in the cards for Leinart (right) to make it back into the starting lineup.

So the Cardinals now are taking a look at Derek Anderson, who joined the team in the offseason for backup money but with the chance to at least nominally compete for the starting job. Anderson has been a pro since 2005, and in his one season as a full-time starter he threw for 29 touchdowns and 3,787 yards for a Cleveland offense that had solid targets in Braylon Edwards and Kellen Winslow. Anderson has a big arm and can fling the ball downfield, but he’s inconsistent and prone to mistakes. Last year, he played half the season and threw just three touchdowns with 10 interceptions. He doesn’t have the consistency that Leinart should have, but given the fact that head coach Ken Whisenhunt wants to move the Cardinals to a run-oriented offense, Anderson can provide the balance of more big plays that will keep defenses from focusing completely on Beanie Wells and Tim Hightower. If Anderson can avoid turnovers, he has a real shot to seize the job from Leinart much as Warner did back in 2006-07.

Fantasy football owners should actually hope that happens. Anderson’s much more likely to keep Larry Fitzgerald’s fantasy value up around the top 5 at receiver because of deep passes. Likewise, Breaston and Doucet would have marginally more value with Anderson. Of course, that uptick in value comes with more risk, given Anderson’s propensity toward inconsistency and interceptions, but fantasy owners crave the upside that Anderson can provide.

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Sidney Rice: No longer hip

Sidney Rice, while a member of the Minnesota V...

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Amazingly, Brett Favre isn’t the biggest newsmaker in Minnesota right now. Earlier this week, WR Sidney Rice announced he had hip surgery, which will cost him about half the season and could still land him on injured reserve. In response to Rice’s injury, the Vikings signed Javon Walker and traded for Greg Camarillo. Below are some thoughts on Rice’s injury and the acquisition of Camarillo (we already wrote about Walker here), both from an on-field perspective and a fantasy football perspective.

Rice had a breakout season last year with Favre throwing the ball, catching 83 passes for 1,312 yards and eight touchdowns. While Favre’s arrival certainly aided Rice’s development into a Pro Bowl selection, it was also the common third-year emergence for receivers like Rice who were high draft picks. (Rice was a second-rounder.) He’s big and has outstanding ball skills, which makes him a downfield threat despite marginal NFL speed. Rice’s size coupled with Percy Harvin’s breakaway ability would have given the Vikings a top-level receiving duo that’s also young, but now that Rice will miss much of the season, the Vikings don’t have a No. 1 receiver. Maybe Harvin can emerge, or maybe former high-dollar free-agent signing Bernard Berrian can recapture his promise. But neither Harvin nor Berrian has the size to be such a dependable threat as Rice.

After injuries benched Rice for half the season and put Harvin’s season in question, the Vikings  dealt for reinforcements. Camarillo, a former undrafted free agent, established himself as a solid receiving threat with 110 catches over his last two full seasons. While he has only averaged about 11 yards per catch during those two seasons, he’s a dependable possession receiver who provides depth for the Vikings and who may eventually fit into the slot if Rice and Harvin return. If nothing else, Camarillo’s acquisition ensures that the Vikings will still be able to run multi-WR sets effectively. In exchange for Camarillo, the Vikings sent Sapp to Miami. Sapp started a career-high seven games last year, and he’s proven to be a decent nickelback and special-teams player. Since Camarillo was likely losing prominence in Miami after the addition of Brandon Marshall and the development of Patrick Turner and Brian Hartline, it makes sense for Miami to get a solid role player in return for him.

For fantasy football purposes, Rice’s injury knocks him out of being a top-15 fantasy wideout and makes him a speculative pick who’s worth a roster spot in leagues with deep benches. He’s probably now worth a pick around No. 40 among wideouts. Harvin is a top-20 talent whose migraine problems make him a high risk/high reward pick, and Rice’s injury raises Harvin’s upside a bit. Berrian’s stock shoots up so that he is now draftable as a starter, while Camarillo is worth adding to draft boards among the top 200 overall. Most of all, these injury problems in his receiving corps limit Favre’s upside and knock him out of Tier 2 and onto the same level as risk/reward picks Jay Cutler, Eli Manning, and Kevin Kolb. At this point, expecting Favre to even approach his 33-TD season of a year ago is foolhardy.

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Crazy Kicker of Preseason Week 2

The Crazy Kicker of the second week of the preseason didn’t choose this mantle – it was forced upon him. The Chicago Bears’ regular long-snapper, Patrick Mannelly, was sidelined by a neck stinger for the preseason game against the Oakland Raiders. So tight end Desmond Clark (Go Deacs!) had to fill in. The results weren’t good. In the second quarter, lined up for a 38-yard field goal attempt, Clark bounced a snap to holder Brad Maynard. Kicker Robbie Gould picked up the ball and tried to heave a deep pass, but he was called for intentional grounding.

Give Gould credit for trying to make something out of nothing. Also, give him the honor of Crazy Kicker of the Week.

2010 Crazy Kickers of the Week
CFL: WR Dave Stala, Tiger-Cats
Preseason Week 1: P Brett Kern, Titans
Preseason Week 2: PK Robbie Gould, Bears

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Fantasy Football: Separating RB teammates

Ricky Williams

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 As we prepared our Fantasy Football draft board, we cross-checked our list against others around the web, and we noticed that we had a contrarian view of how fantasy numbers of NFL teammates at running back will compare. So in this post, we’re going to break down several of these teammate situations to explain our thinking – and hopefully give you a leg up in your draft process.

(By the way, our Draft Board broke all sorts of traffic records for the blog. Thanks to everyone who checked it out, and welcome back. Hopefully you’ll find more useful fantasy insights and NFL analysis throughout the 2010 season.)

Giants – Ahmad Bradshaw vs. Brandon Jacobs – Most fantasy analysts are pointing to Jacobs as the best fantasy option in New York, hearkening back to Jacobs’ solid 2008 fantasy season. But the reality is that Bradshaw was the best back in blue last year, averaging a yard per carry more than Jacobs. And even though he’s smaller than the bullish Jacobs, Bradshaw outscored Jacobs 7 touchdowns to 6. Jacobs appears to be wearing down, while Bradshaw seems to be emerging as a running threat. Our sense is that Bradshaw will take over the starting job this year and be on the good side of a 60-40 carries split, which will mean Jacobs’ fantasy stake will depend totally on touchdowns. We’d take Bradshaw as a top-25 running back, but Jacobs is a low-upside No. 4 back on our board. Bradshaw’s the better bet, and it’s not close.

Dolphins – Ricky Williams vs. Ronnie Brown – Most evaluators include both Williams and Brown among the top 25 at running back, but most of them favor Brown over Williams. We don’t, and here’s why. Williams had better yards-per-carry and yards-per-catch averages than Brown, and his fantasy numbers were less dependent on scoring than Brown’s were. Williams is also a better receiver than Brown. We expect Williams to end up with about 1,200 yards from scrimmage, while Brown will end up with about 1,000. Unless Brown outscores Williams by a bunch, Williams will be the more valuable fantasy back.

Cowboys – Marion Barber vs. Felix Jones – Barber outgained Jones 932-685 last year, even though Jones averaged 1.3 yards per carry more last season. Barber also had 14 more catches than Jones. A little bit of those accumulated differences is due to the fact that Jones missed two games, but he’s missed games in both of his pro seasons. Barber (who missed one game himself) has proven to be a consistent producer of both yardage and touchdowns over his career, and he’s a much surer bet than Jones. Jones will have bigger games than Barber, but Barber’s season-long production makes him a more valuable fantasy option.

Browns – Jerome Harrison vs. Montario Hardesty – Fantasy pundits are all over Harrison after he piled up 561 yards and five touchdowns in the final three weeks of the season last year. But we’d encourage you to slow your roll on Harrison. He was averaging just 3.4 yards per carry on the season before those games (against the Raiders, Chiefs, and Jaguars, not one a top-level defense) and hadn’t scored a touchdown on 88 carries. We’d rather bet on rookie Montario Hardesty, who had a good career at Tennessee, than on Harrison coming anywhere close to replicating his out-of-character end-of-season stats. So we have Hardesty as a No. 3 fantasy back and Harrison as a No. 4.

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Walkin’ in Minneapolis

Quarterback - Wide Receiver Warmups

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The Vikings sought out a blast from the past Monday by signing WR Javon Walker. Walker, once an elite receiver who had thousand-yard seasons both in Green Bay and in Denver, didn’t play in 2009 after being cut by the Raiders. But this move could blow up in their faces. Here’s why:

Walker comes to Minnestota to help a receiving corps that faces health issues for Sidney Rice and Percy Harvin (along with Jaymar Johnson). Walker was highly productive in Green Bay and Denver, but he was a high-dollar bust in Oakland, and he hasn’t been healthy in years. Plus, he and Brett Favre are far from chums, after Favre (4 in the picture) threw Walker (84 in the picture) under the bus during  a holdout when both were Packers. If Walker still has something left, he could be a find for the Vikings, but adding him at this point – especially after he had such public disputes with Favre – seems like a strange (if not a desperate) move.

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FR: Preseason trades

In this post, we’ll compare the significance of trades made during training camp and the remainder of the preseason. We’ll update this post throughout the preseason. For earlier analysis of post-draft trades, check out this post.

10 – 49ers trade DT Kentwan Balmer to Seahawks for 2011 6th-round pickBalmer left the 49ers during training camp, and it became clear that he wasn’t going to make the opening-day roster. So San Francisco was fortunate to get a sixth-rounder in exchange for the 2008 first-round selection. Balmer never really fit in as a defensive end in San Fran’s 3-4, and so a new start in a 4-3 defense could be a benefit. And having a believer like former 49ers GM Scot McCloughan in Seattle’s front office won’t hurt either. For the Seahawks, Balmer is a low-cost gamble on a former top prospect, and that’s one way for them to upgrade a talent base that is sadly lacking.

9 – Seahawks trade DE Lawrence Jackson to Lions for 2011 6th-round draft pick – Jackson, a former first-round pick, apparently didn’t fit the Seahawks defensive system under new head coach Pete Carroll despite the fact that Jackson played for Carroll at USC. Jackson played in every game during his two years in Seattle and started 24 of them, but he had just 61 total tackles and 6.5 total sacks. With this trade, the Seahawks replaced the sixth-rounder they traded away for Kentwan Balmer, and basically state they’d rather have Balmer than Jackson. But Jackson’s talent is worth a shot for Detroit, which needs playmakers who can get after the passer. Perhaps Jackson serves as an understudy for former Seahawks LB Julian Peterson, who is Detroit’s jack-of-all-trades and pass-rushing linebacker. Even if it doesn’t work out, the deal makes sense as the Lions seek to continue to upgrade their talent level with a former hot prospect.

8 – Eagles trade OG Stacy Andrews to Seahawks for 2011 seventh-round pick – The Eagles imported Andrews from Cincinnati at big money last season to stabilize their offensive line and help his brother Shawn Andrews rebound from depression. But Shawn Andrews was cut this offseason, and Stacy’s performance didn’t match up to his price tag. So in their continuing effort to get younger, the Eagles shipped Stacy to the Pacific Northwest. In Seattle, Stacy Andrews could become a starter at guard or even right tackle for a team that needs OL help. In Philly, the Eagles will rely on recent acquisition Reggie Wells to start until youngsters emerge.

7 – Dolphins trade WR Greg Camarillo to Vikings for CB Benny Sapp – After injuries benched Sidney Rice for half the season and put Percy Harvin’s season in question, the Vikings (who had already lost WR Jaymar Johnson for the season) dealt for reinforcements. Camarillo, a former undrafted free agent, established himself as a solid receiving threat with 110 catches over his last two full seasons. While he has only averaged about 11 yards per catch during those two seasons, he’s a dependable possession receiver who provides depth for the Vikings and who may eventually fit into the slot if Rice and Harvin return. If nothing else, Camarillo’s acquisition ensures that the Vikings will still be able to run multi-WR sets effectively. In exchange for Camarillo, the Vikings sent Sapp to Miami. Sapp started a career-high seven games last year, and he’s proven to be a decent nickelback and special-teams player. Since Camarillo was likely losing prominence in Miami after the addition of Brandon Marshall and the development of Patrick Turner and Brian Hartline, it makes sense for Miami to get a solid role player in return for him.

7 (con’t) – Seahawks trade CB Josh Wilson to Ravens for conditional 2011 fifth-round draft pick – Wilson started 24 games in Seattle over the past two years, but he wasn’t able to lock down a starting job under the new Pete Carroll regime. So instead of keeing Wilson as a nickelback, Seattle traded him to Baltimore for a conditional fifth-round pick. After losing Domonique Foxworth, the Ravens need a ton of quarterback help, and Wilson (who went to Maryland in college) is at least a starting-quality guy.

7 (con’t) – Ravens trade WR Mark Clayton and an undisclosed draft pick to Rams for undisclosed draft pick – Clayton, a former first-round pick whom the Ravens expected to develop into a No. 1 receiver, never supplanted Derrick Mason in Baltimore, and this offseason Baltimore brought in Anquan Boldin and then T.J. Houshmandzadeh at receiver. So Clayton heads to St. Louis, where he will step in for the injured Donnie Avery and give Sam Bradford an NFL-quality receiver. Clayton hasn’t been great, but he has a 67-catch season and three other 40-catch seasons on his resume, which makes him a more qualified veteran than any other guy on the Rams’ roster.

7 (con’t) – Chiefs trade S Jarrad Page to Patriots for undisclosed draft choice – Page, a four-year vet who missed two-thirds of last season with a calf injury, refused to sign his restricted free-agent tender with the Chiefs  until the last minute because he wanted out of town. Finally, the Chiefs made a deal to send the three-year starter to New England for a late-round draft pick. Page becomes a senior member of the Patriots’ young secondary, and he could become a factor at strong safety for the Pats. It’s worth it for a contender like the Pats to add a veteran like Page if they think he can help, even in a minor role.

6 – Cardinals trade OG Reggie Wells to Eagles for 2011 6th-round pick – Wells, who has started all 16 games at guard for the Cardinals in five of the last six years, now moves to the Eagles to provide depth in case OGTodd Herrmans and C Jamaal Jackson struggle to return to form after injuries or even to start in place of the since-traded Stacy Andrews. Paying a sixth-rounder for him is a good investment for the Eagles. Wells lost his spot in Arizona after the Cardinals added Alan Faneca last year and Rex Hadnot this offseason and after Deuce Lutui returned as a restricted free agent. The move saves the Cardinals $2.6 million.

6 (con’t) – Cowboys trade WR Patrick Crayton to Chargers for 2011 seventh-round pick – Crayton is a dangerous punt returner and a decent receiver, but with Miles Austin’s emergence and Dez Bryant’s arrival in Dallas, his playing time was going, going, gone. He requested a trade or his release, and the Cowboys finally got a little something in the form of a seventh-round pick from the Chargers in exchange for Crayton. For the Bolts, it’s a good deal because it provides more protection against Vincent Jackson’s holdout. Crayton will fit in nicely as a third receiver behind Malcom Floyd and Legedu Naanee.

6 (con’t) – Broncos trade CB Alphonso Smith to Lions for TE Dan Gronkowski – The Broncos gave up their 2010 first-round pick to take Smith, but they gave up on the diminutive but speedy cornerback after just one year. Smith was a big-time playmaker in college, but in 15 games as a rookie he broke up just three passes for the Broncos. Still, he’s got talent, and the Lions are so talent-poor at cornerback that Smith is a good acquisition. Smith could eventually fit in as a nickelback for a solid defense. In exchange, the Broncos get Gronkowski, one of three NFL-playing brothers. Dan had just one catch as a rookie after being a seventh-round pick last year. He’s little more than a role player, and not nearly enough of a player to salve the sting of the wasted Smith pick in Denver.

6 (con’t) – Jaguars trade S Reggie Nelson to Bengals for CB David Jones and a conditional draft pick – Nelson, a former first-round pick, started his career well in Jacksonville, but after his first year or two he fell out of favor especially because of his subpar tackling skills. But Cincinnati loves to take chances on talent, and Nelson still has that. In exchange for Nelson, the Jags pick up a developmental cornerback in Jones who could make the roster and a conditional draft pick.

5 – Broncos trade RB J.J. Arrington and conditional 2011 draft pick to Eagles for LB Joe Mays – Arrington, who was a key contributor to Arizona’s Super Bowl team two years ago but who didn’t play last year, moves from Denver, where he was behind Knowshon Moreno and Correll Buckhalter, to Philly, where there appeared to be a clearer shot to a third-down role behind LeSean McCoy and Mike Bell. However, Arrington was released at the final cutdown. That means that the Eagles will get a 2012 sixth-round pick in exchange for Mays. The timing of the trade was a bit unlucky for the Broncos, because Moreno and Buckhalter got hurt on the first day of training camp just after the trade, which caused Denver to add LenDale White and Justin Fargas for RB depth. Mays was just a special-teamer in Philly, but Denver needs depth at linebacker in its 3-4 system, so he becomes a candidate for playing time there.

5 (con’t) – Vikings trade QB Sage Rosenfels and RB Darius Reynaud to Giants for 2011 fifth-round draft pick and conditional 2010 draft pick – Rosenfels, whom the Vikings traded for last offseason to compete with Tarvaris Jackson before Brett Favre was in the picture, was a waste as a No. 3 quarterback. He’s not the most consistent player around, but while he makes mistakes, he has starting experience and a good arm and can provide a nice spark as a backup. The move also allows the Vikings to keep rookie Joe Webb as a developmental No. 3 quarterback. The Giants, who lost free-agent signee Jim Sorgi to a training-camp injury, didn’t trust youngster Rhett Bomar and so they traded a fifth-rounder for Rosenfels. It’s a solid move for a team that fancies itself a contender. The Giants also gave up a conditional draft pick in 2012 for Reynaud, a running back and return man who has spent the last two years in Minnesota.

4 – Falcons trade OL Quinn Ojinnaka to Patriots for an undisclosed 2011 draft pick – The Patriots face an offensive-line depth issue with Logan Mankins holding out and Nick Kaczur injured, and so they traded for Ojinnaka, a fifth-year player who has played both at guard and tackle for the Falcons. The Patriots have an idea of what they’re getting, because they recently held a series of practices with the Falcons and got an up-close look at Ojinnaka. Ojinnaka is good enough to be a backup at several positions, and he can start in a pinch, so it’s a worthwhile investment for the Patriots – even though Ojinnaka faces a one-game suspension to start the season.

3 – Lions trade OT Tyler Polumbus to Seahawks for undisclosed 2012 draft pick – Detroit took advantage of its waiver-claim priority to claim Polumbus, who started half a season in Denver last year. The claim ended up netting them a draft pick when they sent Polumbus to the Seahawks, where he will be reunited with offensive coordinator Jeremy Bates, who was in Denver in Polumbus’ rookie year. It’s good transaction math for Detroit, and Polumbus helps a Seattle team that needs tackle depth because of rookie Russell Okung’s ankle sprain.

3 (con’t) – Redskins trade CB Justin Tryon to Colts for an undisclosed 2011 draft pick – Tryon, who had spent two years with the Redskins, starting two games, moved to Indianapolis on cut-down day in exchange for a draft pick. Tryon’s a nice prospect with good speed but below-average size at 5-foot-9, but Indy’s defense makes use of corners of that size.

3 (con’t) – Ravens trade DE/OLB Antwan Barnes to Eagles for 2011 seventh-round pick – The Eagles, who have been adding pass-rushers all offseason, got another one in Barnes. Barnes played mostly as a 3-4 outside linebacker in Baltimore, and that experience will allow him to bring a new dimension to the Eagles’ defense. They’ve liked Barnes for a while, according to Mike Lombardi. Philly has made several small trades this offseason, so dealing a seventh-rounder for a player they expect to make the roster seems like a good investment. For the Ravens, instead of cutting Barnes, they add a seventh-rounder that will help make up some of the draft picks they’ve dealt in search of a cornerback.

2 – Eagles trade FB Charles Scott to Cardinals for CB Jorrick Calvin – After the Cardinals lost FB Nehemiah Broughton for the season for a knee injury, they traded for Scott, a rookie out of LSU who played tailback in college but will have to move to fullback in the NFL. In exchange, they gave Philadelphia the player taken immediately after Scott in the sixth round of April’s draft – CB Jorrick Calvin out of Troy. Calvin has a chance to make the Eagles as a kick returner and extra DB.

2 (con’t) – Cowboys trade OT Pat McQuistan to Dolphins for undisclosed draft pick – McQuistan is a big, burly tackle who joined the Cowboys when Bill Parcells was in charge but never started a game in four seasons. He became expendable in Dallas as Doug Free developed and Alex Barron arrived. Now he moves to Parcells’ new home in Miami, where he will back up OTs Jake Long and Vernon Carey.

2 (con’t) – Eagles trade LB Tracy White to Patriots for conditional 2012 draft pick – The Patriots stockpile draft picks, but they used one to get White, a special-teams ace. The Eagles pick up an extra pick for a player who wasn’t going to make their roster.

1 – Ravens trade QB John Beck to Redskins for CB Doug Dutch – Beck, who was once a second-round pick in Miami under head coach Cam Cameron, tried to rebuild his career with Cameron (now an offensive coordinator) in Baltimore. But when Marc Bulger came in to be Joe Flacco’s backup in Baltimore, Troy Smith beat Beck out for the No. 3 QB job. He moves to Washington, where he will try to usurp Rex Grossman as Donovan McNabb’s backup or at least win a roster spot as a No. 3. In return for Beck, the Ravens get Dutch, a practice-squad cornerback last year who may have a chance to make the roster at a very shallow position for the Ravens.

1 (con’t) – Redskins trade FB/TE Dennis Morris and a condiational pick to Rams for DE/OLB Hall Davis and a conditional pick – Morris wasn’t going to make the Redskins’ roster, so they traded him to the Rams in exchange for Davis, another rookie who will get a shot at outside linebacker in the Redskins’ 3-4. Morris was a sixth-round pick out of Louisiana Tech in April’s draft; Davis was a fifth-round pick out of Louisiana-Lafayette. Davis was immediately cut in Washington, so St. Louis won’t be seeing the conditional pick coming its way.

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The salt to replace Peppers?

Everette Brown and Tyler Brayton

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My hometown of Spartanburg, S.C., isn’t usually a beacon of NFL activity, but each August it becomes the summer home of the Carolina Panthers. This year, one of the big questions begging to be answered was whether the Panthers will be able to replace DE Julius Peppers, who left for the Chicago Bears via free agency this offseason.

This is a daunting challenge for the Panthers. Peppers led the team with 10.5 sacks last year; no other Panther had more than 5. Peppers has 81 career sacks; the Panthers’ other holdover defensive ends have a total of 31. But training camp this year showed that perhaps the Panthers do have the salt to replace Peppers.

One of the starting defensive end spots will go to Tyler Brayton (No. 96), a seven-year veteran who holds up against the run and can occasionally get to the passer. Brayton had two sacks in the preseason opener, and he’s at least a legitimate starter. But for the Panthers to excel, they need one or more of their young players to emerge as consistent pass-rushing threats. While that’s no given, at least the Panthers have their share of candidates to do so.

Charles Johnson, a former third-round pick, has 10 sacks over the last two seasons, and he’s currently positioned to start opposite Brayton. Johnson has developed into a pretty good player, but he may not have the potential to be great. Still, he’s a legitimate part of a NFL-quality rotation.

The bigger hopes for pass-rushing excitement are even younger than three-year vet Johnson. Second-year man Everette Brown (No. 91), whom the Panthers traded their 2010 first-round pick to draft in the second round in ’09, had just 2.5 sacks as a rookie, but he is still a promising prospect. And the Panthers have two rookies – sixth-rounder Greg Hardy, a physical specimen who starred at Ole Miss, and fourth-rounder Eric Norwood, an OLB-DE hybrid from South Carolina. Both were productive college players, and both showed quite a bit of talent during training camp.

The Panthers will be sunk if Johnson, Brown, Hardy, and Norwood all struggle at the same time. But if these players can show their talent, and if one or two of them can do that consistently, the Panthers may not be as destitute in the pass-rushing category as it appeared they would be when Peppers left. Training camp in my hometown showed that Panthers fans can still have hope that the roster does in fact have the salt to at least begin replacing Peppers.

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Andrews lands with Big Blue

Shawn Andrews, drafted 16th overall by the Phi...

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 The Giants made a surprising addition on Friday by adding former Eagles Pro Bowl guard Shawn Andrews. Andrews, who made two Pro Bowls and thrived at guard for the Eagles, lost his job there after playing only two games over the past two years. Last season, the problem was a back injury, while a battle with depression cost Andrews the entire 2008 season. The Eagles said he failed a physical when they cut him in March. If he gets in shape and stays healthy, Andrews can still be an above-average guard who can help address injury issues the Giants are facing with Chris Snee and Rich Seubert. And you’d assume that Andrews would be motivated to play the Eagles twice this season. (This Tweet indicates he is.) Maybe this is a gamble that doesn’t pay off, but it makes sense for the Giants to take a low-cost shot on a player who thrived before.

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