Daily Archives: June 28, 2010

Baltimore’s bargain bin

A few weeks ago, we posted on the Ravens’ signing of veteran FS Ken Hamlin to a one-year deal. Well, the Ravens have continued the trend of signing veterans as one-year insurance policies by adding QB Marc Bulger and CB Walt Harris. Here are some thoughts on those moves; you can see how they compare to other June signings later this week.

Bulger was once a franchise quarterback in St. Louis, but years of playing behind a terrible offensive line sapped his effectiveness, led to injuries, and scuttled his starting career. So after posting three consecutive years with a 90-plus passer rating, Bulger has been pretty bad in recent years with his rating staying below 72. That’s a massive drop. The Rams have moved on to Sam Bradford, and now Bulger moves on to Baltimore. The Ravens are a good fit for Bulger because they have a solid offensive line and a top-flight running game, which means that if Bulger has to replace Joe Flacco, he’s set up to succeed. For the Ravens, meanwhile, Bulger provides a professional quarterback who’s just 33 and can be more of a long-term fill-in than Troy Smith at this point. This is a win-now move at $2.3 million that may not have been possible if not for the uncapped year.

The signing of Harris is a similar transaction. Harris missed all of last season after an offseason injury, but before that he was a starter for some pretty good San Francisco defenses. Harris will be 36 when the season opens, but his more physical style can work in the right system. For a Ravens team that has really struggled at cornerback in recent years, Harris is the kind of veteran who may help younger players develop and who could even contribute on the field if the system makes up for his age-related shortcomings.

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Horn hangs it up

Joe Horn, who last saw game action in 2007, joined the retirement parade when he signed with the Saints so that he could retire with the franchise. Below are some thoughts on Horn’s surprising career; you can see how he compares to other retiring players in this post.

When I think of Horn, I don’t think of his infamous cell-phone touchdown celebration. I don’t even think of him as a Saint, which is what he was for his four Pro Bowl berths. (That’s why it was fitting that Horn re-signed with New Orleans for a ceremonial contract so that he could retire as a Saint.) Instead, I think back to my days at Pro Football Weekly and editing rosters. Part of our job for the PFW Preview magazine each year (which is still one of the best) was to edit the rosters down to fit. Some players would get their own lines; others would be relegated to a paragraph at the end. Horn started his career in the paragraph after coming to the Chiefs out of the CFL – he played for Shreveport and Memphis during the CFL’s ill-fated U.S. expansion era. And when Horn moved up to his own line on the roster, his alma mater – Itawamba J.C. – stuck out like a sore thumb. Considering that beginning, Horn’s rise to prominence in New Orleans is nothing short of shocking. Horn fought for his NFL chance and made the most of it once he grasped it, surpassing 600 career catches and 8,700 receiving yards and scoring 58 touchdowns. Horn earned a well-deserved spot in the Saints Hall of Fame, and as he retires we should celebrate his determination to establish himself as an NFL star.

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Filed under Football Relativity, NFL Free Agency