Fantasy Football: Old running backs

As we continue our fantasy football coverage, we wanted to put the microscope on some of the older running backs available. Several long-time fantasy stalwarts either turned 30 before the season or will do so during the season. We’re going to compare these 30-plus backs via a Football Relativity poll, with 10 being the best of these backs and 1 being the fantasy irrelevants. We’ll make notes throughout the poll of how these levels compare on a full fantasy draft board.

One other note: We’ve covered some of these backs in former posts. For those backs, we have compared them on the scale and linked to what we’ve written about them previously. You can read all of our fantasy football coverage by going through the category listing for the blog.

10 – LaDanian Tomlinson, Chargers (age 30) – We discussed Tomlinson in this post on potential first-round running backs.

9 – Brian Westbrook, Eagles (age 30) – We discussed Westbrook in this post on potential first-round running backs.

*The players above this level are potential first-round picks and No. 1 running backs

8 – Thomas Jones, Jets (age 31) – Jones didn’t have more than 627 yards rushing in any of his first four seasons of the league, but he has been over 900 years since, including four straight years of at least 1,100 yards. Last year, he was a huge fantasy factor, rushing for 1,300 yards and scoring 15 total touchdowns. Jones did this even with Leon Washington around as a triple threat who took away some carries. The Jets will likely rely on Jones heavily again this season, given the fact that the Jets appear to be going with rookie Mark Sanchez as their starting quarterback. New York also drafted Shonn Greene, but the rookie from Iowa will likely be more of a factor in 2010 and beyond than this year. Washington and Jones both had some contractual issues this year, so Greene might have been an insurance policy against a holdout. Regardless, that leaves Jones as a tremendously reliable No. 2 running back in most leagues whom you can count on for 1,100 yards and at least 7 touchdowns as well. He’s just getting better with age.

7 – Larry Johnson, Chiefs (turns 30 in November) – I was down on Johnson last year, and he’s still a guy I’m a little hesitant on. But Johnson, despite missing four games last year, had 874 rushing yards and five touchdowns, which projects out to quality numbers for a No. 2 running back. Johnson is no longer a fantasy stud, but he’s still a factor. He’s worth a look around pick 40 in most drafts. (We also dealt with Johnson in this post.)

7 (con’t) – Jamal Lewis, Browns (age 30) – Lewis just barely broke the 1,000-yard barrier last year, and he only scored four touchdowns. But he seems to be holding up OK given his age and the pounding he has taken. Last year’s numbers are probably predictive of what he is now – he has averaged about 3.5 yards per carry in three of the past four years, but in those years he still has accumulated at least 900 yards. Moreover, the Browns still don’t have a replacement who can really challenge Lewis for carries. So while Lewis isn’t exciting, he’s still a borderline No. 2 fantasy back who is worth starter consideration in most leagues.

*The players above this line are every-week starters in most league formats

6 – none

– Sammy Morris, Patriots (age 32) – If you weren’t a Morris owner last year, you probably don’t realize that he had 700 yards and seven touchdowns. That’s great production for a No. 3 running back. This year, with Fred Taylor now around, you have to figure Morris’ numbers will go down. But we’d still take Morris ahead of Taylor or Laurence Maroney, and that makes Morris a solid backup option with starter potential in most fantasy leagues.

5 (con’t) – Chester Taylor, Vikings (turns 30 in September) – Taylor won’t get all that many carries with Adrian Peterson in town, but he is a quality back who makes the most of the carries and catches he does get. Last year he had 798 yards in 146 touches and tallied six total touchdowns. That makes Taylor a solid backup, and if Peterson ever gets hurt, Taylor immediately becomes a big-time fantasy starter.

4 – Correll Buckhalter, Broncos (age 30) – We discussed Buckhalter in this post on players on the move.

4 (con’t) – Fred Taylor, Patriots (age 33) – We discussed Taylor in this post on players on the move.

3 – Ricky Williams, Dolphins (age 32) – After two years with only one NFL game, Williams returned last year and proved that he can still play. He totalled 878 total yards and five touchdowns sharing time with Ronnie Brown. Some of those numbers will decrease this year, because the addition of rookie Pat White will take away some carries. But Williams will still do enough to be draftable in most fantasy leagues. A projection of 600 yards and four touchdowns is reasonable, and that’s not bad. Plus, if Ronnie Brown gets dinged up, Williams becomes a legitimate starting option. He’s still someone who needs to be in the top-100 on your draft board.

*The players above this line are draftable in most 10-to-12-team leagues. The players below this line are generally not draftable but are worth monitoring during the season.

2 – Maurice Morris, Lions (turns 30 in December) – We discussed Morris in this post on players on the move.

2 (con’t) – Dominic Rhodes, Bills (age 30) – We discussed Rhodes in this post on players on the move.

1 – Edgerrin James, free agent (age 31) – James got cut by the Cardinals and doesn’t currently have a job. If he does land a gig, the way he ran in the postseason shows he has some juice left. Watch the transactions list and be ready to add James to your draft board if he signs.

1 – Warrick Dunn, free agent (age 34) – Like James, Dunn was released in the offseason. But his numbers last year – 786 rushing yards with a 4.2 yards-per-carry average, along with 47 catches – show that he still has the legs to be relevant. So he’s a guy to remember if he signs somewhere before or even during the season.

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