Category Archives: NFL front offices

Breaking down how the Colts are blowing things up

For National Football Authority, we break down how the Colts aren’t just seeing the end of the Peyton Manning era. Instead, they are blowing things up. Find out who else we think is on the way out, and who the Colts should try to keep for their new era. Click here to read all about it.

Could C Jeff Saturday and WR Reggie Wayne be swept out in Colts changes? via espn.com

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Chargers opt to keep Norv Turner, A.J. Smith

English: Norv Turner, the coach of the San Die...

Chargers head coach Norv Turner. Image via Wikipedia

For National Football Authority, we break down the San Diego Chargers’ decision to keep head coach Norv Turner and GM A.J. Smith after missing the playoffs for the second straight year. What are the Chargers thinking? Is it the right move? Click here to read all about it.

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FR: Franchises on the LA Express

Los Angeles Stadium

Image via Wikipedia

The consortium that is trying to build a new NFL-ready stadium in Los Angeles revealed this week that it has talked to five franchises about moving – the Vikings, Chargers, Rams, Jaguars, and Raiders. A rival group has targeted the Bills and 49ers as well . So we thought we’d take the opportunity to use our Football Relativity tool to compare which of the seven we think is most likely to relocate, and why.

10. Chargers – Dean Spanos’ franchise has been looking for a new stadium to replace an outdated building that began as Jack Murphy Stadium and went through a major renovation in the late 1990s. But California and its municipalities are so broke that the only way a new stadium is going to get built is via private financing. The franchise has an out in its lease it can exercise each season, and the L.A. group has offered to pay the $24 million fee that goes along with breaking that lease. One hangup could be that Spanos doesn’t want to sell majority ownership, which the L.A. group wants, but that could be negotiated. Plus, if L.A. gets two teams for its stadium, a la the new Meadowlands in New York/New Jersey, a Spanos-owned team would work. There’s a very real possibility that the team which began its existence as the L.A. Chargers could once again take that name.

9 – Raiders - Al Davis has already proven he has wanderlust by moving the Raiders from Oakland to L.A. and back again. The Oakland deal he struck in the mid-90s resulted in a lower-tier stadium that keeps the Raiders from making maximum revenue. The lease hasn’t been smooth because of unmet ticket-sales guarantees and other issues, and the team is looking for a new stadium. But California economic problems make that difficult. One option is a new Bay Area stadium that the Raiders and 49ers (who also play in an antiquated arena) could share; but with little momentum toward such a building, Davis could simply turn south, where he has a built-in fan base.  And while it seems unlikely that Davis would sell his majority share in the team, L.A. money could provide him a nifty golden parachute.

8 – none

7 – none

6 – Vikings – If anyone doubted that the Vikings need a new stadium, the Metrodome roof collapse last season proved otherwise. The Vikings’ lease expires in 2011, so the franchise has leverage to push for a new stadium deal, as the Twins and the University of Minnesota have gotten in recent years. There seems to be an agreement in place, but L.A. is ready to pounce if that deal falls through. Right now, it looks as if the Vikings will find a way to get a new stadium and stay in Minnesota, but that’s not yet written in stone.

5 – Bills – The Bills play in one of the league’s smallest markets, which limits their revenue potential. But Ralph Wilson isn’t looking to move the AFL original; instead, he is trying to grow his market by playing in Toronto and getting that metro area into his fan base. That’s a wise move, and it makes the Bills less of a target for Los Angeles. Still, the small-market situation isn’t getting better anytime soon, and so the Bills will remain on the backburner of the L.A. discussion.

4 – Jaguars – The Jaguars have long been the target of relocation speculation, in large part because of the tarps that cover upper-deck seats for Jacksonville home games. But in 2005, the Jaguars signed a lease that keeps them in North Florida through 2030, and owner Wayne Weaver shows no desire to move. The question is whether the Jaguars’ flagging ticket sales have kept Weaver from turning a profit. If so, moving is a possibility. But if the bottom line is acceptable to the owner, he ain’t leaving Jacksonville.

3 -none

2 – Rams – The Rams moved to St. Louis in the mid-1990s into a brand-new dome stadium. But NFL stadia age quickly, and the franchise will have the opportunity to get out of its lease in 2014 if certain upgrades aren’t made. It doesn’t appear that new owner Stan Kroenke wants to move the team from St. Louis, where it has a strong fan following, or sell the majority share in the team he just finished buying. But the fact that the Rams have talked to the L.A. group shows that they’re covering all their bases.

1 – 49ers – Stadium woes put the 49ers on this list, but the team appears to have little to no interest in moving out of the Bay Area. Who can blame them – they own one of the country’s top markets in one of the nicest places to live anywhere. But if the stadium situation isn’t solved, Los Angeles rumors could at least provide leverage in the negotiations.

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Freeze tags: Vick, Mankins, Harris

Mike Vick with Philadelphia

Franchise player Michael Vick of the Eagles. Image via Wikipedia

In the midst of labor strife that is growing more and more contentious,* NFL teams are starting to place franchise and transition tags on players. There’s no telling whether these tags will survive past the March 4 lockout deadline – it’s one of many matters of debate – but they are still newsworthy enough to discuss.

(*We’re not covering the ins and outs of the NFL/NFLPA negotiations on the blog, but we will be retweeting coverage we find helpful. Follow here if you’re interested.)

Thus far, three high-profile players – QB Michael Vick of the Eagles, LB David Harris of the Jets, and OG Logan Mankins of the Patriots – have received the franchise tag. Under the current rules, this tag guarantees them one-year salaries equal to the average of the top five at their position and prevents other teams from signing them without a trade. There are two kinds of tags: an exclusive tag, which guarantees more money on the one-year tender and prohibits a player from negotiating or signing with another team, and a non-exclusive tag, which offers a guaranteed one-year tender but also guarantees a team two first-round picks if the tagged player signs a long-term contract with another team.

Also, PK David Akers of the Eagles got the transition tag, which guarantees him a one-year salary equal to the average of the top 10 at his position, and gives the Eagles the right to match if he signs a free-agent contract elsewhere.

Below are some thoughts on these players and their importance to their teams. Once the franchise-tag deadline passes, we’ll compare all the franchise and transition players using our Football Relativity tool.

QB Michael Vick, Eagles (exclusive franchise tag) – It’s no surprise that the Eagles tagged Vick, because they didn’t want to risk losing him after the gamble they made signing him off the scrap heap paid off handsomely. Vick emerged as not just the Eagles’ starter but as a dynamic force this season, throwing for 21 touchdowns with just six interceptions, and running for nine TDs. Despite missing four games, Vick was an elite player, earning Comeback Player of the Year honors and contending for MVP during the season. Vick has grown as a passer, surpassing his career-best in completion percentage in 2010 (62.6 percent) by a long shot. He’s in his prime, and the Eagles appear prepared to give him the kind of megadeal that franchise QBs tend to get. The Eagles will need to keep Kevin Kolb or develop Mike Kafka as a backup, because Vick gets hit more than most QBs and will miss some time, but that shouldn’t be an obstacle to keeping Vick.

ILB David Harris, Jets (non-exclusive franchise tag) - Harris hasn’t gotten a lot of publicity in his career – he has yet to make a Pro Bowl, for example – but he has emerged as an elite 3-4 inside linebacker. He’s sturdy against the run and dangerous against the pass, and he’s able to blitz at times as well. He is the heart of the Jets’ defense, and so the team franchised him instead of WRs Santonio Holmes or Braylon Edwards, among others. It’s a good move, because Harris can become the Ray Lewis of their defense, providing stability and impact inside while allowing the players around him to make the splashier plays on the blitz in the Jets’ uberaggressive scheme.

OG Logan Mankins, Patriots (non-exclusive franchise tag) - Mankins sat out the first half of the season rather than play on a restricted free-agent tender, yet he still made the Pro Bowl. He’s become an all-star regular based on his physical play inside. Mankins, a former first-round pick, expressed his desire for a trade last year, but he may be more apt to accept a $10-million-plus one-year deal for 2011 than he was to risk his health for a $1.5 million deal in 2010. It’s hard to imagine that any guard would be worth this kind of money, but the Patriots clearly don’t want to lose Mankins, and they’re willing to pay for him to play. The question is whether Mankins will let bygones be bygones and move forward from this point.

PK David Akers, Eagles (transitioned) – It took Akers a couple of years to establish himself in the pros, but once he did he has become an 11-year stalwart at kicker for them. He’s made five Pro Bowls, including the last two, and was an all-decade kicker for the 2000s. The Eagles clearly trust Akers, despite a couple of misses in the playoffs this year. For a contender, paying a few million dollars to keep a trusted kicker is a worthwhile investment, and it’s not uncommon for kickers to get tagged, because it’s not prohibitively expensive to do so, and this seems like a shrewd move for the Eagles. Akers, meanwhile, continues to kick at a high level, and he deserves to cash in.

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FR: NFL 2010 Head Coaching Vacancies

Jason Garrett

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The coaching carousel started spinning early this year, but now that the season’s over we want to compare all of the NFL head-coaching vacancies. We’ll do this using our Football Relativity comparison, with 10 marking the most attractive vacancy and 1 the least attractive. We’ll add in vacancies as they become available.

10 – Dallas Cowboys - Dealing with Jerry Jones, the league’s most involved (or is it meddlesome?) owner, is no picnic, but the Cowboys have a lot going right for coaching candidates. Tony Romo is an above-average or even borderline Pro Bowl quarterback, and the team is in good shape at the skill positions on offense and the front seven on defense. OLBs DeMarcus Ware and Anthony Spencer and NT Jay Ratliff are premium players on D, and on offense TE Jason Witten and WRs Dez Bryant and Miles Austin provide the kind of star power that most teams don’t have. The new coach (which is apparently going to be Jason Garrett, held over after going 5-3 as an interim coach) will have to rebuild the offensive line and the defensive secondary, but having a specific hit list indicates that the roster on the whole is in decent shape. Plus, Jones has deep pockets and isn’t afraid to spend to acquire talent. Maybe Jones as GM would scare off some candidates, but Dallas is definitely a plum job for Garrett.

9 – none

8 – none

7 – Carolina Panthers - The Panthers fell apart in their final season under John Fox, and quarterback issues were to blame. Carolina believed that Matt Moore’s two successful late-season fill-in stints predicted success, but Moore failed, as did rookie Jimmy Clausen. As a result, the Panthers’ youth-is-served season flopped. But Carolina has the No. 1 overall pick, which could allow a new coach to build with a franchise quarterback, a la Steve Spagnuolo and Sam Bradford in St. Louis. A rookie QB would have a solid offensive line anchored by C Ryan Kalil and Pro Bowl OLT Jordan Gross, a stud receiver in Steve Smith, and a first-rate running game. While the passing game needs a lot more depth behind Smith, the situation is at least as good as what Bradford stepped into. On defense, the Panthers have a terrific player in MLB Jon Beason and other young and emerging guys such as DE Charles Johnson. All that is to say that the cupboard isn’t bare. The organization is respected around the league, and owner Jerry Richardson has traditionally provided everything a coach wanted – as long as a lockout wasn’t looming. Carolina likely will look for a younger coach, and whoever gets the gig will have a pretty good first shot at head-coaching success.

6 – Minnesota Vikings - The Vikings are a team at a crossroads. Just two years ago, the Vikings had a raft of Pro Bowlers, but the team appears to be passing its peak as a whole. Guys like OG Steve Hutchinson and OLT Bryant McKinnie are declining, and DE Jared Allen, DT Kevin Williams and CB Antoine Winfield may be cresting the hill as well. With RB Adrian Peterson and WRs Sidney Rice and Percy Harvin, the Vikings do have young, dangerous skill-position threats, but quarterback is a major question mark, even with rookie Joe Webb’s performance lately. The Vikings may have a year or two more of contention before a complete rebuild is necessary on the field, but that’s coming. Plus, the team’s stadium situation is bad, and a move could be in the offing. So while there’s talent in Minnesota, there are a ton of questions as well. They have kept Leslie Frazier, who went 3-3 as an interim coach. The interim-coach tag hasn’t been a harbinger of future success, but Frazier has been a top candidate for years, and he should be a good hire for the Vikings.

5 – Cleveland Browns - The Browns flushed Eric Mangini following his second straight 5-11 season with the team. Mangini’s team played hard, but it didn’t have enough playmakers, especially on offense. RB Peyton Hillis is a force, and he runs behind a solid offensive line led by OT Joe Thomas and C Alex Mack. And Mangini transitioned the Browns to a 3-4 defense that had some punch, thanks to underrated finds like LBs Marcus Benard and Matt Roth. Rookie CB Joe Haden and S T.J. Ward had good seasons as well. So the Browns are better off now than they were two years ago. The new coach must upgrade the offensive punch, though, so that Cleveland goes from feisty to dangerous. The big question the new coach must answer is whether Colt McCoy is the future of the franchise at quarterback. If he is, an offense built around accuracy with upgraded targets outside is the answer. But if McCoy isn’t the answer, the rebuilding project looks much tougher. Team president Mike Holmgren also looms, and rumors persist that he wants to coach again. That shadow may be too large for some coaches. Cleveland isn’t a perfect job, but it isn’t a talent wasteland either.

4 – San Francisco 49ers - The 49ers suffered under Mike Singletary, who was a better motivator than plan-maker. That was especially true at quarterback, as the Niners vacillitated between Alex and Troy Smith. Neither is a long-term answer, and that’s the biggest problem in San Francisco. The offensive line is well stocked, as rookies Mike Iupati and Anthony Davis started the whole year, but the skill positions are not. TE Vernon Davis is a legitimate weapon, and RB Frank Gore is proven but has a lot of miles on his tires. WR Michael Crabtree is a talent whose full potential is yet to be unlocked. But while questions persist on offense, on defense the Niners have a strong identity thanks to a 3-4 defense led by Patrick Willis. The cornerback position isn’t up to par, but a lot of pieces are in place.  The fact that the organization is unsettled with a new GM likely headed in is a mixed blessing; if the coach and GM work together like Atlanta’s group, for example, then starting completely over is the way to go. But coach and front office pulling in different directions would be a recipe for disaster. San Francisco has some appealing pieces, but they haven’t yet fit together, and without a long-term answer at quarterback it’s hard to see things melding quickly. That will be the pressing challenge for the new coach.

3 – Denver Broncos - Josh McDaniels didn’t just fail as a coach in Denver; he failed as an organizational leader with a plan. As a result, the Broncos’ wagon is hitched to Tim Tebow, and the team is missing draft picks because of trades for failed players like Laurence Maroney and Brady Quinn. Denver is a mess, and the new head coach will need significant front-office help to turn things around. Holdover QB Kyle Orton can play at an above-average level, and Tebow has unique skills that a coach could potentially develop. And the receiving corps has Brandon Lloyd, who broke out this year, and promising rookie Demaryius Thomas. Knowshon Moreno is also an asset if he can stay healthy, and the offensive line is in decent shape. But the defense is a complete mess, never making the transition to a 3-4. The secondary is full of older players like Champ Bailey and Brian Dawkins who won’t be able to perform at their traditional level for many more years. Denver ownership traditionally gives head coaches carte blance, but that came back to bite the Broncos with McDaniels, leaving a mess for the next coach. A defensive guru is probably the best fit, given the team’s massive needs on that side of the ball.

2 – Oakland Raiders – Tom Cable’s contract expires, and signs right now are that Al Davis will not exercise the option to keep him. That’s surprising, because Cable was able to lead the Raiders to finally snap a long string of double-digit-loss seasons this year. Cable went 8-8, running the table in the AFC West in the process. Oakland finally established an identity here as a rushing team behind Darren McFadden, who finally realized his potential, and Michael Bush. And the Raiders have a solid group of young receivers, led by Louis Murphy, Jacoby Ford, and Zach Miller, despite the fact that ’09 first-rounder Darrius Heyward-Bey has been a disappointment. Jason Campbell is an average quarterback who can succeed with a strong running game. And on defense, the additions of Kamerion Wimbley and Richard Seymour in recent years has added punch to the pass rush that was much needed. Rookies Rolando McClain and Lamarr Houston were big hits in their first years. And Nnamdi Asomugha is still one of the league’s best corners. So the Raiders finally have the arrow pointed upward, despite an inconsistent organization that vacilitates based on Davis’ whims. Cable is succeeding in it, as did Jon Gruden a decade ago, but the situation is not for everyone. That’s what gives Cable a chance of sticking around even after hanging in the wind.

1 – Cincinnati Bengals - Marvin Lewis’ contract expired in Cincinnati, and while it appears that he will stay in town, we included the Bengals. Lewis is apparently willing to walk away over some of the cost-saving ways in the dysfunctional land of the Bengals, most notably an indoor practice facility and the razor-slim scouting staff. It’s unclear whether those issues will be addressed to Lewis’ satisfaction. Cincinnati has talent on the roster, but that’s largely because they take character risks more often than just about any other team in the draft, not because of good scouting. As a result, when things are good on the field, the Bengals can keep the ball rolling, but when things go south, things fall apart quickly. It’s hard to imagine a coach changing that culture immediately, especially since owner/GM Mike Brown is set in his ways. Plus, Brown tends to be cheap off the field, which makes the working environment less appealing than in other places. Still, the roster offers hope. QB Carson Palmer hasn’t had his best year, but he’s still got a strong arm, and he can be a solution instead of a problem in the right system. And while the Bengals don’t have a ton of stars (aside from diva receivas Chad Ochocinco and Terrell Owens, who’s a free agent), they have a plethora of above-average players all around the field. A coach won’t get the control he craves in Cincinnati, but it’s possible to win there. The real challenge is to build consistency from year to year with a fragile locker room.

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McNabb’s new contract: Shrewd wrapped in stupid

Donovan McNabb, Washington Redskins

Image by the extinction blues via Flickr

At first glance, the new contract the Washington Redskins gave QB Donovan McNabb before their embarrasing Monday-night loss to the Eagles looks stupid. After benching McNabb in a two-minute drill comeback attempt, the Redskins immediately handed him a five-year contract extension reportedly worth up to $88 million. The deal, which puts McNabb below Tom Brady but above guys like Aaron Rodgers on the QB payscale, appears exorbinant for a 33-year-old player who is declining and appears to be in coach Mike Shanahan’s doghouse to boot.

But on closer inspection, this deal may be a smart deal wrapped in a stupid package. In reality, the only obligation the Redskins take on for sure is a $3.75 million up-front payment that basically keeps McNabb from automatically hitting the free agent market after the season. At that point, the Redskins would have to pay $10 million in an option bonus plus a $2.5 million 2011 salary to keep him around.

That’s a smart investment. While McNabb is no longer an elite quarterback, he would undoubtedly have offers on the open market. Arizona and Minnesota have been rumored to like McNabb, and McNabb would be a significant upgrade over both teams’ 2011 options, even in his late-career decline. So if McNabb hit the open market, Washington would have to pay this kind of deal (if not a bigger one) to keep him, just based on market forces. By paying $3.75 million now, the Redskins assure that they will have McNabb if they want him. That’s a good investment, especially since the Redskins’ other 2011 options (Rex Grossman?) aren’t appealing either.

Plus, Peyton Manning’s impeding free agency will result in a record-setting deal for him in Indianapolis. (There’s no way the Colts let him leave.) And Drew Brees is one year away from the open market and a candidate for extension as well. Both players are better than McNabb, but their new deals may well drive up the market rate for starting QBs. Signing McNabb now gets them assurance that, at most, they pay 2010 prices for their QB, not the 2011 going rate.

McNabb has not played well for the Redskins, but he hasn’t been a disaster either. So letting him go via free agency with nothing in return would be a huge mistake for Washington. Now, they control his rights and have the opportunity to keep him, trade him, or cut him – instead of facing the uncertainty of the market. That kind of control is worth $3.75 million for the team.

For McNabb, meanwhile, the deal gives him money up front and keeps him on the list of elite quarterbacks, at least in financial terms. Getting that check now looks especially appealing with the specter of a 2011 lockout keeping money out of his pocket. If the lockout happens before free agency begins, McNabb will still have $3.75 million in his pocket. Plus, the contract assures him that the Redskins will have to cut or trade him early if they don’t want to keep him. That should give McNabb options if he must move on.

The raw numbers on the contract looked ridiculous, but the Redskins actually made a shrewd move through this deal.  Their $3.75 million up front investment is well worth the options it gives them, no matter how McNabb performs on the field over the rest of the season. Kudos to the Redskins front office for being willing to take a PR hit to do the smart thing – even though everyone accused them of being stupid.

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Who’s rebuilding, who’s reloading? NFC edition

As the NFL draft wound down, and I tried to get Mel Kiper’s voice out of my head, I had an idea – let’s evaluate which NFL teams are rebuilding and which are reloading, and whether each team is taking the right approach. Here’s the NFC edition; click here for the AFC edition.

NFC East

Dallas is reloading – After their first playoff win in nearly 15 years, the Cowboys kept the band together for the most part. They cut OT Flozell Adams and S Ken Hamlin, but both players had hit steep declines. The draft class starred Dez Bryant, who will add a receiving weapon for an offense that emerged last year, and ILB Sean Lee, who could plug in if Keith Brooking starts to struggle. The Cowboys believe their time is now, and last year’s results were good enough that such a strategy is sound. Verdict: Right approach

New York Giants are reloading – The Giants started to fall off the table last year, both on defense and on the offensive line. But instead of starting a major overhaul, the Giants are trying a patchwork approach. The biggest changes are at safety, where C.C. Brown is out, and Antrel Rolle and Deon Grant are in. First-round DE Jason Pierre-Paul is a developmental prospect who should spice up a pass rush that struggled last year, and second-round DT Linval Joseph shores up the interior. It seems like the Giants’ team that won the Super Bowl is getting old, though, and we have to wonder if more aggressive changes were in order. Verdict: Wrong approach

Philadelphia is rebuilding – The Eagles, despite making the playoffs again last year, went on a major rebuilding effort in the offseason in an effort to set themselves up not just for 2010 but for the first half of the new decade. So Kevin Kolb replaces Donovan McNabb, LeSean McCoy and Mike Bell replace Brian Westbrook, and LB Ernie Sims and DE Darryl Tapp add to a defense that gave up CB Sheldon Brown and LB Will Witherspoon. Then the draft added a ton of players like DE Brandon Graham and S Nate Allen who could develop into building blocks. This is rebuidling on the fly, and the Eagles seem to be doing it well. While it may lead to a slight step back this season, it sets them up to continue being a model franchise. Verdict: Right approach

Washington is rebuilding – Now that the Mike Shanahan era has begun, the Redskins are doing a full overhaul on the roster. QB Donovan McNabb is the marquee signing, but guys like DT Maake Kemeoatu and OG Artis Hicks are significant as well. Washington didn’t have a ton of draft picks, but OT Trent Williams should become a building block. The Redskins added a bunch of veterans to try to speed the rebuilding process, especially on offense, and time will tell if that’s the right approach, but Washington needed change on offense badly. Verdict: Right approach 

NFC North

Chicago is reloading – The Bears were hamstrung into their reloading strategy by a couple of factors. First, Lovie Smith is on the hot seat, and so he needs to win now. Also, last year’s Jay Cutler and Gaines Adams trades took Chicago’s first two draft picks and forced them into the free-agent market for most of their help. Drafted S Major Wright could help immediately, but the big help will come from imports DE Julius Peppers and RB Chester Taylor. Given the situation the Bears had entering the season, they took the only tack they could. Verdict: Right approach

Detroit is rebuilding – The Lions continued to tinker with the back end of the roster and strategically add key pieces. In free agency, they brought in Kyle Vanden Bosch and Nate Burleson to help Ndamukong Suh and Matthew Stafford thrive. That strategy is no coincidence. Jahvid Best and Tony Scheffler also become offensive weapons who should make life easier for Stafford. Detroit has really upgraded its roster over the past few years, and while they’re still behind, respectability is on the horizon. Verdict: Right approach

Green Bay is reloading – The Packers continued their build-through-the-draft strategy, which means that they’re always adding players around the edges and keeping the core intact. The Packers again this year don’t have any significant free-agent additions, so it’s up to draftees Bryan Bulaga, Mike Neal, and Morgan Burnett to provide a talent infusion. But because the Packers have built so well through the draft for so long, this strategy can now sustain itself. Verdict: Right approach

Minnesota is reloading – The Vikings haven’t gotten much help through free agency, aside from CB Lito Sheppard, but this final-four team was close enough that a few tweaks could be enough. The Vikes had better hope this is true, because a draft class headlined by Chris Cook isn’t exciting, although Toby Gerhart and Everson Griffen could find roles. Verdict: Right approach

NFC South

Atlanta is reloading – The Falcons made one of the big strikes of free agency by adding CB Dunta Robinson, who addresses a position of need for a team coming off back-to-back winning seasons for the first time. First-round LB Sean Witherspoon adds a jolt to the defense as well. Those additions, combined with the fact that Atlanta hasn’t lost any significant players, will keep the Falcons in the hunt. Verdict: Right approach

Carolina is rebuilding – While the Falcons haven’t lost that much, Carolina purged a ton of veterans – losing Julius Peppers in free agency, trading Chris Harris, and cutting longtime stalwarts Jake Delhomme, Maake Kemeoatu, Na’il Diggs, Damione Lewis, and Brad Hoover. Carolina is going young, which also means going cheap. So Matt Moore and Jimmy Clausen will battle at quarterback, and the defensive line will look completely different. The Panthers played well after a slow start, and so this step back hurts fans, but it’s better to rebuild a year early than a year late. Verdict: Right approach

New Orleans is reloading – The Super Bowl champs are trying to get back, and so they added Alex Brown to replace the disappointing Charles Grant and re-signed Darren Sharper to another one-year deal. They lose some important players like Mike Bell, Jamar Nesbit, and Scott Fujita, but none of those were core players, and that means the Saints should be in the mix yet again. Verdict: Right approach

Tampa Bay is rebuilding – The Buccaneers need a ton of help, and they’re aware of those needs. The draft brought DT help in Gerald McCoy and Bryan Price and WR help in Arrelious Benn and Mike Williams. That’s not all the help the Bucs needed, but those two positions are now in development, as is quarterback with ’09 first-rounder Josh Freeman. The Bucs still have several more trouble spots to address, but at least they’re checking a few spots off the to-do-list. Verdict: Right approach

NFC West

Arizona is rebuilding – The Cardinals are coming off back-to-back playoff appearances, but they’ve undergone a pretty significant roster change this offseason. Gone are stars Kurt Warner, Anquan Boldin, Karlos Dansby, and Antrel Rolle. In are QB Derek Anderson, who will compete with Matt Leinart, and OGs Alan Faneca and Rex Hadnot, who will help the Cards move toward more of a run-first approach. On defense, rookies Dan Williams and Daryl Washington provide reinforcements. Arizona is trying to remake its image further, and it’s necessary with Warner’s quick release now in retirement. Verdict: Right approach

St. Louis is rebuilding – The Rams are in the midst of serious roster overhaul, and first overall pick Sam Bradford is at the center of it. To help Bradford, fellow rookies Rodger Saffold and Mardy Gilyard come aboard as well. In free agency, the Rams mainly played around the margins with guys like Na’il Diggs, Hank Fraley, and Fred Robbins, hoping these vets can keep them competitive as they develop younger talent. As bad as the roster was in St. Louis, rebuilding wasn’t a choice – it was a necessity. Verdict: Right approach

San Francisco is reloading – Mike Singletary has kept the Niners on the fringe of contention lately, and now the Niners are going for the jugular. First-round OTs Anthony Davis and Mike Iupati add the kind of physical nastiness that Singletary wants from his line, while Taylor Mays and Navarro Bowman add speed to the defense. Free-agent signee Travis LaBoy and trade acquisition Ted Ginn Jr. are the kinds of role players a team on the verge likes to add to keep moving forward. Alex Smith will have to come through for this to be the right approach for San Francisco, but we can understand why the Niners are making their bets this way. Verdict: Right approach

Seattle is rebuilding - The Seahawks seemed to get old suddenly over the past two years, and new head coach Pete Carroll has been incredibly proactive in trying to reverse that trend. Rookies Golden Tate, Earl Thomas, and Russell Okung could all start immediately, as the Seahawks try to replace the departed Nate Burleson, Deon Grant, and the retired Walter Jones. Most of all, the Seahawks tried to set up their future at quarterback by paying handsomely for Chargers third-stringer Charlie Whitehurst. It remains to be seen whether the Seahawks have picked the right guys in their rebuilding project, but for now we can at least give them credit for having a clear picture of just how bad the roster was. Verdict: Right approach

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