Category Archives: Finding a Fit

What’s next for Jacoby Jones?

For National Football Authority, we break down the reasons that the Houston Texans released WR Jacoby Jones. We analyze what Jones is (and isn’t) at this point in his career, and what teams should be interested. Click here to read all about it.

Ex-Texans WR Jacoby Jones, via si.com

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Will Dallas Clark ride Peyton Manning’s coattails?

For National Football Authority, we break down whether tight end Dallas Clark will follow his former Colts teammate Peyton Manning to a new team. Will Clark fit with the Broncos, Cardinals, and Dolphins? Or will he need to look elsewhere? Click here to read all about it.

Ex-Colts TE Dallas Clark, via bostonherald.com

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Which teams should jump in for QB Matt Flynn?

For National Football Authority, we break away from the “Suck for Luck” sweepstakes to focus on another potential quarterback solution – Packers backup QB Matt Flynn, who will be a free agent after the season. Which teams should jump in for Flynn? Click here to find out who the best fits may be.

Packers QB Matt Flynn, via patriotsdaily.com

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Finding a Fit: Zach Miller

The lockout is on the verge of ending, and the proposed resolution will set four- and five-year veterans free. So in our next edition of Finding a Fit, we’re going to feature someone from that class – the best unfettered tight end, Zach Miller of the Raiders.

Previous Finding a Fit features focused on Matt Hasselbeck, Nnamdi Asomugha, Ray EdwardsAubrayo Franklin, Plaxico Burress, Tyson Clabo, and Matt Light. Click through to check those out. Since the lockout is likely ending, this will probably be the last Finding a Fit feature of the offseason, so that we can turn to signings analysis soon.

Zach Miller, courtesy of theredzonereport.com

Synopsis

Miller, a former second-round pick, has put together four solid NFL seasons. After a solid rookie season, Miller has averaged 60.7 catches for 756 yards over the past three seasons despite having some of the shakiest quarterback play in the league. He’s a big target at 6-foot-5, but he has the speed to get down the seam and make big plays. The Raiders looked as though they were going to use their franchise tag on Miller, but a strange cause in OLB Kamerion Wimbley’s contract forced the Raiders to spend their tag there. That means Miller will hit the free-agent market without restriction, and he should be a popular target in Oakland and elsewhere.

Potential Fits

Oakland – The Raiders want to keep Miller, because they know he can make big plays while also being a dependable receiver. That’s important, since the Raiders rely on young, unproven receivers like Louis Murphy, Jacoby Ford, and the disappointing Darrius Heyward-Bey. The Raiders don’t have another legit TE option, and they’ve been knowing to overpay to keep their guys, so Miller could get an offer he can’t refuse from the Godfather Al Davis.

Denver – If the Raiders don’t keep Miller, their AFC West rivals in Denver could provide a quality landing spot. The Broncos had some of the worst TE production in the league last year. Daniel Graham is good as a  blocker, but he makes next to no plays in the passing game. And the Broncos’ two draft picks at the position, Julius Thomas and Virgil Green, aren’t likely to be big-time threats. Denver needs help in a lot of areas, but Miller would be a major upgrade in one.

Arizona – Like the Broncos, the Cards had horrific TE play last year. Holdover Ben Patrick makes little difference, and third-round pick Robert Housler is a raw prospect. That means that Miller (an Arizona State product) could come home and make a big difference. At one point, the Cards had such WR depth that a tight end wasn’t vital, but Larry Fitzgerald needs help, and Miller could provide it. If the Cards are looking to add a veteran QB, adding Miller could be a nice inducement.

Miami – The Dolphins’ offense likes to use a tight end, but Anthony Fasano is no more than a decent option. So Miller could be the kind of seam threat that would add a lot to the passing game.

Cleveland – As the Browns move to a West Coast offense, a big-time receiving tight end becomes important. Benjamin Watson had a nice season last year, and fourth-rounder Jordan Cameron could develop into a successor, but at least calling to see what neighborhood Miller’s price tag is in would be wise for the Browns.

St. Louis – The Rams didn’t get great production at tight end last year with Daniel Fells and Michael Hoomanawanui, although Hoomanawanui has potential. But Miller doesn’t dovetail with new coordinator Josh McDaniels’ offense, and the Rams need to spend their attention on outside receivers more than at tight end.

Atlanta – The Falcons will likely try to re-sign Tony Gonzalez, but if the free agent leaves, Miller could become their latest splashy, high-dollar addition.

N.Y. Giants – The Giants have gotten good production out of Kevin Boss in recent years, but Boss is fairly injury prone, and youngster Travis Beckum has yet to develop. So while adding Miller would be a major luxury, it does make a bit of sense.

Buffalo – The Bills are bereft of tight end talent aside from the injury-prone Shawn Nelson, so Miller is a fit. But it’s hard to see Miller going to play for a terrible team in terrible weather.

The Best Fits

1. Oakland – We smell an overpay coming from the Raiders when it comes to Miller. The question is whether Miller would want to leave enough to turn down more money.

2. Arizona – A homecoming for Miller makes a lot of sense, especially if the Cards find a veteran QB to add.

3. Denver – The Broncos outpace Miami as the stalking horse in this race.

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Finding a Fit: Matt Light

After a few weeks off to focus on other news, go to Wayfarer Camp, and go on vacation, we’re returning to our Finding a Fit series. Our last edition focused on a right tackle, and now we swap sides to focus on Patriots OLT Matt Light.  This is the seventh edition in a series that will continue as long as the lockout drags on. In this series, we’re going to look at free agents and try to match them to their perfect fits. We’ll consider opportunity, skill specificity, personality, and even money as we do this.

Previous Finding a Fit features focused on Matt Hasselbeck, Nnamdi Asomugha, Ray EdwardsAubrayo Franklin, Plaxico Burress, and Tyson Clabo. Click through to check those out, and if you’d like to suggest a player for finding a fit, leave a comment or let us know on Twitter.

Matt Light blocks for Wes Welker

Synopsis

Light, a second-round pick in 2001, emerged as a left tackle starter right from the start, and as a rookie helped the Patriots to their first Super Bowl win. For the rest of the decade, Light remained a fixture at left tackle, eventually growing into a Pro Bowl-level tackle. With three Super Bowl rings and three Pro Bowl berths, Light is one of the great Patriots of the Bill Belichick era. Light was never a dominant player like teammate OG Logan Mankins is, but he was incredibly dependable in keeping Tom Brady upright and in opening holes in the run game. But with a decade of play under his belt, Light’s best days are now behind him, and the Patriots have invested high draft picks in young tackles Sebastian Vollmer and 2011 first-rounder Nate Solder in recent years. So it appears Belichick has a succession plan in place at left tackle. Now Light, as a 10-year vet, has the chance at one more decent contract. The question is whether it will come in New England or land him elsewhere as a free agent.

Potential Fits

New England – The Patriots could keep Light, who would provide a level of security for a team that remains a top contender. But with Vollmer and Solder in place, it’s hard to imagine New England anteing up all that much money or more than a year or two in a contract. Light will find a better offer elsewhere, which means he’ll only be a Pat if he decides to take less money to do so.

Buffalo – The Bills have spent high draft picks on interior linemen Eric Wood and Andy Levitre in recent years, but their tackles are huge problems. OLT Demetrius Bell has physical ability, but his level of play has been less than stellar. Light would be a perfect addition because he brings a veteran presence that they don’t have right now as well as intimate knowledge of a division rival. It’s kind of hard to imagine Light moving into a mentor role for a lowly team after so many years of contending, but if the Bills make him a priority the money may be too much to pass up.

Kansas City – The Chiefs have former first rounder Branden Albert in place at left tackle, but Albert’s play there hasn’t been great. Albert can also play right tackle, where he would be a big upgrade over incumbent Barry Richardson, and so adding Light would allow the Chiefs to upgrade at two positions, at least for the short term. Chiefs GM Scott Pioli, who spent many years with New England, has shown that he likes to bring in ex-Pats, so Light makes sense on that level as well. Adding Light on a two- or three-year deal makes a lot of sense for the Chiefs.

Atlanta – Like the Chiefs, the Falcons are led by an ex-Pat at GM with Thomas Dimitroff. The Falcons also have three starters on the offensive line hitting free agency in ORT Tyson Clabo and OGs Harvey Dahl and Justin Blalock. If Clabo leaves for bigger money, adding Light and shifting former first-rounder Sam Baker to the right side might be a solid, less expensive alternative. Baker hasn’t been a great player at left tackle, but his size could allow him to develop more on the right side. You’d have to think that keeping their own would be Atlanta’s priority, but if Clabo leaves Light enters the realm of possibility.

Pittsburgh – The Steelers went through left tackles like crazy last year after Willie Colon and Max Starks got injured. Now both players are free agents, which leaves a left tackle hole. But Light doesn’t fit the Steelers’ profile of massive linemen, and Pittsburgh’s selection of Marcus Gilbert in the second round seems to be a fallback if Colon and Starks both leave. This is a case where need and player don’t match.

Minnesota – The Vikings struggled mightily up front last year, as OLT Bryant McKinnie was inconsistent and young ORT Phil Loadholt took a step back. But like the Steelers, the Vikings have tended toward massive tackles, and Light’s not one. If the Vikes want to restart their offensive line, Light could be a factor, but the fit doesn’t seem to make sense.

The Best Fits

1. Kansas City – The Chiefs have the combination of need, style, and contention that could be enough to attract Light away from New England.

2. Buffalo – The Bills aren’t contenders, but they’re the team we could see opening up the wallet to overpay Light.

3. New England – If Light doesn’t want to move, we could see the Patriots bringing him back on a one- or two-year deal. But Light will have to take less money to stay in New England.

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Finding a Fit: Tyson Clabo

It’s time to focus on an offensive lineman in our Finding a Fit series, and as we do we’re going to focus on one of the grittiest (or should we say nastiest?) right tackles around – Atlanta’s Tyson Clabo. This is the sixth edition in a series that will continue as long as the lockout drags on. In this series, we’re going to look at free agents and try to match them to their perfect fits. We’ll consider opportunity, skill specificity, personality, and even money as we do this.

Previous Finding a Fit features focused on Matt Hasselbeck, Nnamdi Asomugha, Ray EdwardsAubrayo Franklin, and Plaxico Burress. Click through to check those out, and if you’d like to suggest a player for finding a fit, leave a comment or let us know on Twitter.

Tyson Clabo of the Falcons, via bleacherreport.com

Synopsis

Clabo, a Wake Forest product (Go Deacs!) was undrafted in 2004, and he tried to hook on with the Broncos, Giants, and Chargers before landing in Atlanta in 2005. He broke into the starting lineup in 2006 at right guard, and since then has basically been a full-time starter at right tackle. He finally earned some national recognition this past season with his first Pro Bowl trip. Along with right guard Harvey Dahl, he’s one of the “Nasty Boys,” a pairing that is physical and sometimes plays in the gray area. Clabo has become known as a solid run blocker, but he’s not as strong in pass protection at times. Still, he’s a solid starter who can add some attitude to the run game of a team that wants to be more physical.

Potential Fits

Atlanta- Obviously, Clabo fits the Falcons’ run-first philosophy. The question that will determine whether he returns is price. Dahl and fellow starting OG Justin Blalock are both free agents, and it’s unlikely the Falcons will pay to keep all three. Will Clabo or Dahl be the priority? Clabo will be an unrestricted free agent no matter what system the lockout yields, so the price tag may simply get too rich for the Falcons’ blood. Plus, the Falcons may feel they can develop a replacement such as Garrett Reynolds, and holdover Will Stivek is an acceptable stopgap. Our sense is that price will keep Atlanta from keeping a player they like.

Tampa Bay – The Buccaneers could steal a player from a division rival and fill a need at right tackle. Neither Jeremy Trueblood or James Lee is a comfortable starter, and investing in the running game could help Josh Freeman, LeGarrette Blount and company as they continue their ascension. Plus, Clabo’s  style of play would continue to help the young Bucs develop an identity.

Kansas City – The Chiefs are developing right tackle Barry Richardson, a physical specimen whose play has been inconsistent to this point. If they are frustrated with his development or want more of a sure thing to support a run-first offense, Clabo would be a nice option. Both the Falcons and Chiefs use the same Patriots style of play, so Clabo would be a fit, and he’s the kind of veteran who would be a nice addition to a young locker room. Jamaal Charles and Thomas Jones have to be rooting for the addition of a vet like Clabo.

Cleveland – The Browns have a terrific left tackle in Joe Thomas, but the right side of the line lacks talent or stability. Tony Pashos, Shawn Lauvao, and Billy Yates are all aging players with injury histories, and none provides the kind of stability that a young offense needs. And Peyton Hillis’ running style fits the kind of play Clabo has provided the Falcons in recent years. If you’re looking for a darkhorse in the Clabo race, Cleveland may be it.

Oakland- The Raiders played vets Langston Walker and Khalif Barnes at right tackle last year, but neither is a long-term answer. They hope rookie Joe Barksdale will become the right tackle of the future across from Jared Veldheer, but Clabo’s physical, nasty style could be so valuable to the Raiders that they jump into the market. Clabo plays like an old-time Raider, and owner Al Davis’ habits die hard.

Buffalo – The Bills have a massive hole at right tackle despite their serious offensive line investments in recent years, and they’ve paid top dollar for free-agent linemen in the past. But given where they are in the rebuilding process, it looks to us like they’re far more likely to develop rookie Chris Hairston than to pay big bucks for Clabo.

The Best Fits

1. Atlanta – The grass isn’t greener for Clabo on the other side of the fence. The main question is whether the money will be.

2. Kansas City – If Clabo wants to move, he should be looking for a contender that’s at least as close as the Falcons are. The Chiefs rank just above the Bucs by that criteria.

3. Cleveland – If the Browns are looking for a veteran to lead their line, Clabo fits. He’s exactly the kind of guy you want blocking in front of Peyton Hillis in bad weather.

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Finding a Fit: Aubrayo Franklin

We’re going a little under the radar for this week’s Finding a Fit feature by spotlighting 49ers NT Aubrayo Franklin. While he’s not a big name, he is one of the best pure nose tackles in the league. That’s why he stars in the fourth installment of our Finding a Fit series that will continue as long as the lockout drags on. In this series, we’re going to look at free agents and try to match them to their perfect fits. We’ll consider opportunity, skill specificity, personality, and even money as we do this.

Previous Finding a Fit features focused on Matt Hasselbeck, Nnamdi Asomugha, and Ray Edwards. Click through to check those out, and if you’d like to suggest a player for finding a fit, leave a comment or let us know on Twitter.

Aubrayo Franklin struts his stuff, via sfgate.com

Synopsis

Franklin is a rare bird in the NFL – a run-stuffing 3-4 nose tackle who can hold the point of attack on his own and free the players around him to make plays. After starting his career with the Ravens, he hit his stride with the 49ers, earning the franchise tag when his contract expired in 2009. The 49ers anted up to keep him for 2010, but they did not use the franchise tag again in 2011. Plus, with Paul Soliai staying in Miami via the franchise tag, no other nose tackle comes close to Franklin’s level of performance. Therefore, even at age 31, Franklin will be a key free agent who should hit the lottery with a team that needs help up front in the 3-4 defense that continues to gain prominence in the league.

Potential fits

San Francisco – The 49ers would certainly like to keep Franklin, but they are heavily invested in defense with LB Patrick Willis and must also resign OLB Manny Lawson. San Francisco has already come up with a succession plan of moving Isaac Sopoaga from end to nose tackle to fill Franklin’s large shoes. It seems like Franklin’s price tag will prove to be too much of a gold rush for the 49ers.

Washington – The Redskins are still smarting from the Albert Haynesworth fiasco, but that free-agency failure means that Washington still has a massive hole  at nose tackle. Daniel Snyder and crew have never been afraid to break the bank in free agency, and Franklin’s personality is different enough from Haynesworth to set aside any deja vu concerns. Washington is definitely in play in this scenario.

N.Y. Jets – After losing Kris Jenkins to injury two years in a row, the Jets are moving on from the former Pro Bowl nose tackle. They have competent players in Mike DeVito and Sione Pouha who have played well inside, but both of those players can contribute outside as well, which means nose tackle could still be on the need list. With Shaun Ellis entering free agency and first-round rookie Muhammad Wilkerson still raw, we expect the Jets to sign a veteran up front as a starter. The question is whether it will be a nose tackle like Franklin or an end like Green Bay’s Cullen Jenkins. Still, the Jets’ recent history shows that big-name, big-dollar free agents often land with Gang Green.

Houston – The Texans move to a 3-4 defense this year, and they don’t have a standout or a proven nose tackle on the roster. New defensive coordinator Wade Phillips is talking up holdovers Shaun Cody and Earl Mitchell, but Franklin would provide a massive upgrade as well as stability at the position. The Texans are under-the-radar big spenders, so they could be stalking horses in the Franklin negotiations.

The best fits

1. Washington – When the Redskins identify a player at a need position, the result is usually an above-market contract that players simply can’t turn down. We can see Franklin being the latest in a line of expensive expenditures.

2. N.Y. Jets – If Franklin longs to play for a contender, the Jets offer the best combination of opportunity and money. Plus, if raising his profile is a goal, Rex Ryan’s team is the best place to do so. But the emergence of young players up front for Gang Green keeps this move from being an absolute necessity for the Jets.

3. San Francisco – If for some reason the market doesn’t play out the way Franklin wants, or if the lockout lingers and cuts off the free agent market at the knees, the 49ers would certainly welcome Franklin back.

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Finding a Fit: Ray Edwards

Ray Edwards, the Vikings’ up-and-coming defensive end, earns the spotlight in the third installment of our Finding a Fit series that will continue as long as the lockout drags on. In this series, we’re going to look at free agents and try to match them to their perfect fits. We’ll consider opportunity, skill specificity, personality, and even money as we do this.

We’ve already addressed QB Matt Hasselbeck and CB Nnamdi Asomugha in this series. With each entry, we give a quick synoposis of who the player is at this point, and then seek to find a fit.

If you’d like to suggest a player for finding a fit, leave a comment or let us know on Twitter.

Ray Edwards on the attack, via midwestsportsfans.com

Synopsis
Playing across from Jared Allen, Edwards has developed into a reliable pass rusher with at least 8 sacks in each of the past two seasons. Now he’s ready to cash in and become a team’s focal pressure point, out of Allen’s shadow. The stats indicate that Edwards is ready to take that step after five NFL seasons, but he didn’t get the chance to hit the market last year because the uncapped year meant that unrestricted free agency wasn’t possible until players had accrued six seasons, instead of the previous four. Edwards would get stuck in limbo again if the NFL carried over 2010 rules to 2011, but a new labor deal (whenever it happens) should allow Edwards to hit the open market. In the absence of a Julius Peppers-level superstar, Edwards should be the top 4-3 defensive end on the market. That’s necessary, because his first pro boxing match, while a win, showed that hitting the ring isn’t a long-term career option.

Potential Fits

Minnesota – Edwards was unhappy when the system locked him into the Vikings last year, because it cost him millions of dollars in guarantees. The Vikings will keep Edwards for one more year if the system makes it easy again; otherwise, given the investments in Allen and LB Chad Greenway, the Vikings will probably let Edwards price himself out of town. Edwards seems to have the itch to prove himself as a No. 1 pass rusher. That’s not always wise, but once a player gets that inclination, it’s hard to be happy returning to the same place.

Atlanta – The Falcons have gotten as much as possible out of injury-prone John Abraham the last few years, but they could use another pass-rush threat. Edwards fits from a scheme perspective, and he would be the kind of player a contender can justify overpaying in an attempt to get over the hump. The question is whether the budget – and whatever the new salary-cap rules are – will allow the Falcons to make a big run at Edwards.

Tampa Bay – Had free agency happened before the draft, the Buccaneers could have been major players for Edwards. But after drafting DEs Adrian Clayborn and DaQuan Bowers, it’s unlikely the Bucs would invest in Edwards too. That’s too bad for Edwards, because it would have been a perfect fit scheme-wise on an up-and-coming squad.

Denver – The Broncos haven’t been linked all that often to Edwards, but as John Fox moves the team to a 4-3 defense, it needs a premium defensive end. (Rookie Von Miller is a pass rusher, but he is so small that he’ll probably need to do so from a linebacker position.) So Edwards could be an impactful veteran addition. The question is whether Denver will pay a premium price for a player like Edwards, or whether the Broncos will instead try to add multiple players at cheaper prices. We expect the latter, which would rule Edwards out of the Mile High equation.

Buffalo – Like the Broncos, the Bills are moving to a 4-3, which makes Edwards a good fit. But Buffalo isn’t traditionally a prime free-agent destination, and they aren’t usually the highest bidder either. And Edwards is unlikely to sign up for this big of a rebuilding project. So this marriage looks unlikely, even if it is a fit from a scheme perspective.

Carolina – The Panthers need a 4-3 defensive end, especially if potential free agent Charles Johnson departs. Edwards would be a viable replacement for Johnson, but if the Panthers are going to spring for a high-dollar player, they’re far more likely to keep their own guy instead of bringing Edwards to town.

The Best Fits

1. Atlanta – The need is there, and playing for a contender would certainly appeal to Edwards. This would be a win-now move for the Falcons, who showed with the Julio Jones trade in the draft that they’re willing to take this kind of big swing.

2. Denver – The system switch could entice the Broncos to overpay Edwards. That’s not the approach we would take, but Denver often opens up the purse strings in surprising ways.

3. Minnesota – Only a fit if the system allows them to underpay Edwards for the second year in a row.

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Finding a Fit: Nnadmi Asomugha

Oakland Raiders cornerback Nnamdi Asomugha (#2...

Nnamdi Asomugha in his Raider days. Image via Wikipedia

It’s week 2 of our Finding a Fit series that will continue as long as the lockout drags on. In this series, we’re going to look at free agents and try to match them to their perfect fits. We’ll consider opportunity, skill specificity, personality, and even money as we do this.

We started with Matt Hasselbeck last week, and now we turn to defense and coveted free-agent cornerback Nnamdi Asomugha. With each entry, we give a quick synoposis of who the player is at this point, and then seek to find a fit.

If you’d like to suggest a player for finding a fit, leave a comment or let us know on Twitter.

Synopsis

Before there was a Revis Island, Nnamdi Asomugha was a black hole for passing games. The former first-round pick has made four Pro Bowls and earned two All-Pro nods despite rarely being targeted by opposing quarterbacks because his coverage is so good. But being franchised two years ago led the Raiders to pay top dollar to keep Asomugha, and this year the price tag became too prohibitive. So Asomugha hits the free-agent market in his prime, and as he turns 30 this offseason he’s viewed as the best defensive player on the market and a potential game-changing signee in free agency.

Potential Fits

Philadelphia – The Eagles are considered a front-runner for Asomugha’s services, since they have a big-time CB hole across from Asante Samuel and they have traditionally been willing to spend in free agency. The Eagles had a very young defense last year, and it struggled, so adding Asomugha would be a huge step forward. Since there are several NFC East teams on this list, the Eagles could also view adding Asomugha as a preemptive strike. This doesn’t seem like a perfect fit, but we wouldn’t be surprised if the Eagles make a strong play to bring Asomugha to Philly.

San Diego – Rumors have circulated for a few months that the Chargers would seek to steal Asomugha from their AFC West rivals. That wouldn’t be a characteristic move, because GM A.J. Smith hasn’t chased mega free agents in the past. Still, he would step into an area that isn’t a strength, and the fact that the Chargers are seeking to extend a window of contention that seems to be closing could lead them to take a big swing in free agency.

Dallas – The Cowboys got terrible QB play last year, as Terrence Newman fell apart and former first-rounder Mike Jenkins really struggled. But would Jerry Jones be star-struck enough with Asomugha to throw one of those players away for Nnamdi? It seems like the Cowboys’ greater need is at safety, and so the Cowboys should end up passing on Asomugha, no matter how much of a safety blanket he would be.

Washington - In free agency, the Redskins are a high-dollar player’s dream, because owner Daniel Synder often pays above market value for high-profile players. And Asomugha would answer a need in Washington, because while DeAngelo Hall is in place, Carlos Rogers is a free agent. This isn’t a perfect fit, but you can never rule out an impetuous signing when Snyder is signing the checks.

Tampa Bay - The Buccaneers have a talented young (and cheap) team, and so adding Asomugha would be out of character but not necessarily out of budget. And while Ronde Barber just keeps on rolling along, the Bucs’ best corner, Aqib Talib, has legal problems that could end his Tampa tenure before long. Especially if there is a new system in place with a salary minimum, the Buccaneers could become an under-the-radar player for Asomugha.

Houston – The Texans’ secondary has been porous in recent years, and after losing Dunta Robinson in free agency last year it was even worse in 2010. Houston has spent high draft picks on corners Kareem Jackson (first round, 2010) and Brandon Harris (second round, 2011). But since Jackson and Harris aren’t established, corner remains a need. Adding Asomugha would be an expensive power move, but Houston may just be desperate enough to make the playoffs to pay the price.

Detroit – The Lions, like the Texans, are desperate to move into contention, and they appear primed to do so. One of the biggest things holding them back is poor secondary play. The additions of Chris Houston and Alphonso Smith at corner last year helped improve that area, but neither of those guys is the shut-down talent Asomugha is. Smith probably needs to play in the slot, which would make a spot outside for a new starting corner. And last year, Detroit showed it was willing to make a quick move to pay a player it really wants. It feels like a long shot, but the Lions may end up being surprise contenders for the star corner.

N.Y. Jets – The Jets are always players for big-name free agents, but with Darrelle Revis installed on one side and Antonio Cromartie likely to return as a free agent to the other, Asomugha would be an incredibly expensive luxury for Gang Green.

Oakland – The Raiders love Asomugha, and there doesn’t seem to be bad blood because the team has paid him so handsomely the past two years. But after ponying up to keep Stanford Routt before the lockout, it appears the Raiders are prepared to move on. Asomugha, meanwhile, has to see this as his best chance out of the asylum and into the playoff hunt.

The best fits

1. Philadelphia – Asomugha would be a luxury, but the Eagles could provide the money, opportunity to win, and big market that free agents like Asomugha crave.

2. Tampa Bay – The fit on the football field is almost perfect. The question is whether the Buccaneers would be willing to spend enough to bring in Nnadmi. But the fact that they were in the Albert Haynesworth sweepstakes two years ago indicates that, for the right player, the Bucs will spend big. And few teams have the young talent both offensively and defensively that Tampa does.

3. Houston – The Texans, if they see Asomugha as the last piece to the playoff puzzle, would spend big to get him. Houston has enough other pieces to be an attractive landing spot as well.

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Finding a Fit: Matt Hasselbeck

We’re going to start a new series today that will allow us to keep talking football while the lockout drags on. In this series, we’re going to look at free agents and try to match them to their perfect fits. We’ll consider opportunity, skill specificity, personality, and even money as we do this.

We start today with Matt Hasselbeck, the Seahawks quarterback who will hit free agency if it ever begins. With each of these entries, we’ll give a quick synoposis of who the player is at this point, and then seek to find a fit.

If you’d like to suggest a player for finding a fit, leave a comment or let us know on Twitter.

Matt Hasselbeck, via seahawksgab.com

Synopsis: Hasselbeck is the only quarterback on the free-agent market this offseason who has the talent to be a playoff-quality starter. He has led the Seahawks to six playoff appearances, including one last year, and one Super Bowl in his 10 seasons with the team. While Hasselbeck isn’t the most physically gifted guy, he’s a quintessential West Coast offense quarterback who can spread the ball around and make enough deep throws to keep defenses honest. He’s also a solid locker-room leader who has the kind of personality that a team rallies around. At age 35, Hasselbeck is in decline (his last great season was in 2007), but with a better supporting cast than the Seahawks provided last year, he still could be an above-average NFL starter.

Potential Fits

Seattle – The Seahawks reportedly called Hasselbeck during the one-day lockout lift around the draft to reiterate the fact that they want him back. It makes sense, because Hasselbeck has been a solid starter for the team for a decade. But Seattle has a lot invested in Charlie Whitehurst – both in terms of money and draft-pick equity – and Hasselbeck may have been turned off by the lack of an earlier offer or by Pete Carroll’s decision to trade for Whitehurst last year. Still, though, Seattle is one of the few places where Hasselbeck could still be a two- or three-year starter, which has to enter into his thinking.

Arizona – The Cardinals didn’t draft a quarterback of the future this year, which means they’re hitching their developmental QB wagon to John Skelton and Max Hall for another year. So the Cardinals need a veteran. They’re rumored to prefer Marc Bulger, but Hasselbeck will at least be on their call sheet. With Hasselbeck in place, the Cardinals should be able to stabilize their horrific offensive performance from 2010, which could be enough for them to contend in the mediocre NFC West. But it’s not a West Coast system, which means that Bulger’s probably a better fit for the offense than Hasselbeck would be. Throwing to Larry Fitzgerald would be tempting, as would the chance to be a starter beyond 2011, but this isn’t a perfect fit for Hasselbeck.

Miami – The Dolphins don’t seem to be in love with incumbent starter Chad Henne, but they didn’t draft a replacement for him, and 2010 competitor Chad Pennington has fallen apart physically to the point that he’s no longer an option. Hasselbeck is good enough to push Henne and potentially to keep a team with a solid if unspectacular roster in the playoff hunt. Throwing to Brandon Marshall, Davone Bess, and crew and playing behind a top-notch offensive line would be appealing to Hasselbeck as well. The system fit isn’t perfect, but Hasselbeck’s probably the best option for Miami if they want to add a vet who could potentially beat out Henne. That makes this fit an intriguing hypothetical.

Washington – Under coach Mike Shanahan, the Redskins are a prototypical West Coast offense team. That’s a fit for Hasselbeck; however, the rest of the situation isn’t. The Redskins don’t protect quarterbacks very well, which is a warning sign for a QB like Hasselbeck who has had some injury problems of late, and they also have a young and unproven receiving corps. Plus, the Redskins seem to think more highly of holdover John Beck and free agent Rex Grossman than others do, which would discourage them from adding Hasselbeck. So even if the Skins jettison Donovan McNabb, as expected, we don’t see Hasselbeck fitting in as the veteran du jour.

San Francisco – Per @sportsbarbanter’s suggestion, the 49ers could be a nice fit for Hasselbeck if 2011 is the prime option. Hasselbeck would be a better bridge quarterback to incoming rookie Colin Kaepernick than incumbent Alex Smith, which could put the 49ers in position to contend for a division title. But if the 49ers are indeed committed to bringing Smith back, Hasselbeck will look elsewhere. He won’t want to compete for a starting job in a place where the QB of the future could surpass the winner within a year.

Minnesota – If Hasselbeck wants to be a bridge candidate, Minnesota makes far more sense. The Vikings run a West Coast style system under offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell, and they have enough weapons – Percy Harvin, Visanthe Shiancoe, and of course Adrian Peterson – to be an attractive 2011 landing spot. The Vikings tend to be leaning toward throwing 2011 first-rounder Christian Ponder right into the fire, but if they call Hasselbeck, it’s worth his time to listen.

Tennessee – NFL.com’s Mike Lombardi made this suggestion, arguing that Hasselbeck would be a perfect stopgap while rookie Jake Locker develops. Hasselbeck could certainly do it, and new offensive coordinator Chris Palmer’s system relies on accuracy. But aside from Kenny Britt, the Titans don’t have elite receivers, and that makes us think moving to Nashville could yield nothing more than an average season for Hasselbeck. Thus, this isn’t Hasselbeck’s best stopgap landing spot.

Carolina – The Panthers are the other team with a rookie QB that could look for a placeholding veteran. But Carolina has even more motivation to start its rookie, first overall pick Cam Newton, from day one, which keeps this from being an attractive option for the veteran. Plus, Carolina’s receiving corps may be even worse than Tennessee’s, especially if Steve Smith raises a big stink and gets out of town. We put this fit in the no-chance category.

Oakland – The Raiders don’t seem like a perfect fit for Hasselbeck, but you never know what they’ll do. The deep-ball centric system doesn’t maximize Hasselbeck’s talents, but head coach Hue Jackson is a good enough play-caller that he could cater to the veteran. But with Jason Campbell already on board, and free agent Bruce Gradkowski a solid option to pair with him, the Raiders likely won’t find it worth it to pony up enough money to get Hasselbeck’s attention.

The best fits

1. Seattle – Hasselbeck’s best chance to start beyond 2011

2. Minnesota – Hasselbeck’s best chance for a great 2011 season

3. Miami – Hasselbeck’s best chance to be a multiyear starter if he wants a change of scenery

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